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1 DSR

DIGITAL Standard Runoff (DSR) is a text-formatting facility consisting of DSR commands, DSR flags, the DCL command RUNOFF, the DSR Table of Contents utility, and the DSR Indexing utility. You can use any text editor to create the DSR input file that consists of text to be formatted and the commands and flags to do the formatting. The output file is a either a formatted document or an intermediate file that can be used in subsequent passes to produce final output. Neither the DSR commands nor the DSR flags appear in the final document. For help on the RUNOFF command, return to DCL level and type HELP RUNOFF. 2 Command_line Most DSR commands can be abbreviated. For example, the .AUTOPARAGRAPH command can be abbreviated .AP. To find the accepted abbreviations for DSR commands, refer to the format section for each command listed under HELP DSR DSR_Commands. All DSR commands begin with the Control flag (.) in column 1. Multiple commands may appear on one line. The control flag is followed by the command text, any arguments to the commands, and, if required, the command is terminated with a semicolon (;). For example: .LEFT MARGIN 10 .LIST ELEMENT; text 2 DSR_Commands DSR commands allow you to specify many formatting items, among them: the size of pages, uneven or justified right margins, the amount of spaces to appear between lines, and the arrangement of items in lists. Note that the underscore (_) character in command names shown below are not part of the command syntax but are a convenience for Help. 3 .APPENDIX The .APPENDIX command specifies the beginning of an appendix, assigns an identifying letter to it, and allows you to supply a title. Successive .APPENDIX commands assign identifying letters in alphabetical order. (See also .NUMBER APPENDIX and .DISPLAY APPENDIX.) Format .APPENDIX [text] Abreviated format .AX [text] 4 Parameter text The title you give the appendix 3 .AUTOJUSTIFY When you enter .AUTOJUSTIFY, the following commands automatically execute .JUSTIFY (as well as .FILL) commands: .APPENDIX .CHAPTER .HEADER LEVEL .NOTE If you disable automatic justification by entering .NO AUTOJUSTIFY, DSR does not disturb either the justify/no justify or the fill/no fill states that are in effect (whether by default or as a result of a previous .JUSTIFY or .NO JUSTIFY command) at the time you use one of these commands. Whichever state is in effect remains in effect when you enter .NO AUTOJUSTIFY. (See also .JUSTIFY, .NO JUSTIFY, .FILL, and .NO FILL.) Formats .AUTOJUSTIFY .NO AUTOJUSTIFY Abreviated formats .AJ .NAJ 4 Default .AUTOJUSTIFY 3 .AUTOPARAGRAPH The .AUTOPARAGRAPH and .NO AUTOPARAGRAPH commands turn the automatic paragraph capability on and off. If .AUTOPARAGRAPH is in effect, you do not have to insert .PARAGRAPH commands each time you want to format a paragraph. When you start a line with a space or tab or insert a blank line, DSR automatically formats a new paragraph, using the values of .PARAGRAPH or .SET PARAGRAPH. You can specify values for .PARAGRAPH or you can use the default values (see .PARAGRAPH). .AUTOPARAGRAPH cancels .AUTOTABLE. Formats .AUTOPARAGRAPH .NO AUTOPARAGRAPH Abreviated formats .AP .NAP 4 Default If you have not entered .PARAGRAPH or .SET PARAGRAPH, DSR executes the .TEST PAGE 2 command followed by the .SKIP 1 and .INDENT 5 commands. 3 .AUTOSUBTITLE The .AUTOSUBTITLE command causes DSR to use .HEADER LEVEL titles for running-head subtitles. Subtitles therefore can change according to the section title that applies to a given page. The .NO AUTOSUBTITLE command cancels the .AUTOSUBTITLE function. (See .HEADERS ON, .SUBTITLE, and .HEADER LEVEL.) Formats .AUTOSUBTITLE [[+/-]n] .NO AUTOSUBTITLE Abreviated formats .AST [[+/-]n] .NAST 4 Parameters n The highest numbered header level whose title will be used as a subtitle. For example, if you enter .AUTOSUBTITLE 2, the titles of header levels 1 and 2 appear as running-head subtitles. Header levels 3, 4, 5, and 6 do not appear as running-head subtitles. +n Increases the current highest numbered header level by n. -n Decreases the current highest numbered header level by n. 4 Defaults o If you do not enter .AUTOSUBTITLE or .NO AUTOSUBTITLE, the default is .AUTOSUBTITLE 1. o If you enter .AUTOSUBTITLE with no value, the default is the value you specified with a previous .AUTOSUBTITLE command. If no .AUTOSUBTITLE command was previously entered, the default value is 1. 3 .AUTOTABLE The .AUTOTABLE and .NO AUTOTABLE commands turn the automatic paragraph capability on and off. If .AUTOTABLE is in effect, DSR formats a new paragraph for each line that does not start with a space or tab. It is formatted according to .PARAGRAPH or .SET PARAGRAPH values, whether they are specified or supplied by default (see .PARAGRAPH). The .AUTOTABLE and .NOAUTOTABLE commands cancel .AUTOPARAGRAPH. The .AUTOTABLE command is formatted according to .PARAGRAPH or SET PARAGRAPH values, whether they are specified by the user or supplied by default (see .PARAGRAPH). Formats .AUTOTABLE .NO AUTOTABLE Abreviated formats .AT .NAT 4 Default If you have not entered .PARAGRAPH or .SET PARAGRAPH, DSR executes the .TEST PAGE 2 command followed by the .SKIP 1 and .INDENT 5 commands. 3 .BLANK The .BLANK command inserts exactly the number of blank lines that you specify. It is different from .SKIP, which inserts a multiple of the number of blank lines specified in the .SPACING command (see .SKIP and .SPACING). The .BLANK command does not work after a .PAGE command. Format .BLANK [[-]n] Abreviated format .B [[-]n] 4 Parameters n The number of blank lines you want to insert. -n Specifies that the next line will begin exactly n lines from the bottom of the current page. 4 Default If you enter .BLANK without a value, you get .BLANK 1. 3 .BREAK The .BREAK command ends the current line immediately, without filling or justifying. Enter .BREAK when .FILL is in effect and you want a few short lines of text with no blank lines in between. Format .BREAK Abreviated formats .BR .<Return> 3 .CENTER The .CENTER (.CENTRE) command centers a single line of text around a character position on a line (compare with .RIGHT). Formats .CENTER [[+/-]n]; text .CENTER [[+/-]n] text .CENTRE [[+/-]n]; text .CENTRE [[+/-]n] text Abreviated formats .C [[+/-]n]; text .C [[+/-]n] text 4 Parameters n Twice the value of the character position that you want to center the text around. (Absolute character positions on a line always start with 0 at the leftmost position on the page.) If you center the line of text between settings of the left and right margins, then n is equal to the value specified by the most recent .LEFT MARGIN command added to the value specified by the most recent .RIGHT MARGIN command. +n Moves the character position around which the text is centered to the right by n/2 character positions. This value normally is used to adapt .CENTER to a new setting specified by the .LEFT MARGIN command. -n Moves the character position around which the text is centered to the left by n/2 character positions. This value normally is used to adapt .CENTER to a new setting specified by the .RIGHT MARGIN command. text The text you want to center. You must enter this text on one line. 4 Default If you enter .CENTER without specifying n, the text is centered between the current left and right margins. 3 Change_bar_commands The bar commands control the insertion of vertical bars (|) at the beginning of lines of text. The bars (usually called change bars) are normally inserted to indicate where changes in text have occurred since the previous edition of a document. You can specify a character other than the default character (vertical bars) to indicate changes by using the /CHANGE_BAR qualifier to the RUNOFF command line. Formats .ENABLE BAR .DISABLE BAR .BEGIN BAR .END BAR Abreviated formats .EBB .DBB .BB .EB 4 Default .DISABLE BAR - Operation of the change bar function is not initially enabled. By default, there are no change bars and text is not indented. 4 .ENABLE_BAR The .ENABLE BAR command shifts all text following it three spaces to the right to make room for the bars on the left. The width of the lines of actual text is not altered. 4 .DISABLE_BAR The .DISABLE BAR command disables the bar commands but does not shift the lines of text back to their original position. 4 .BEGIN_BAR The .BEGIN BAR command causes DSR to start inserting vertical bars at the beginning of lines. 4 .END_BAR The .END BAR command causes DSR to stop putting vertical bars at the beginning of lines. 3 .CHAPTER The .CHAPTER command specifies the beginning of a chapter, numbers it, and allows you to supply a chapter title. Successive .CHAPTER commands number the chapters sequentially. (See also .NUMBER CHAPTER and .DISPLAY CHAPTER.) Format .CHAPTER [text] Abreviated format .CH [text] 4 Parameter text The title of the chapter. 3 Conditional_Commands The .IF, .IF NOT, .ELSE, and .ENDIF commands (also known as the conditional commands) cause portions of a DSR file to be processed or not processed, according to conditions that you specify. The commands refer to the /VARIANT qualifier that you specify on the DSR command line. (See also /DEBUG=CONDITIONALS and .VARIABLE.) Formats .IF name .ELSE name .IFNOT name (or .IN name) .ENDIF name (or .EI name) 4 Parameter name A word that is common to the conditional commands that make up a single .IF or .IFNOT block of text. 3 .CONTROL_CHARACTERS The .CONTROL CHARACTERS command causes DSR to accept control characters as normal text in your input file. The characters that are affected by this command are the characters in the DEC Multinational character set with the following decimal values; 1 to 31, 128 to 159, and 255. The control characters 0 (NULL) and 127 (DEL) can only be inserted into a document by using the accept flag (_). A form feed (Ctrl/L or ASCII 12) must be preceded by the accept flag if used in column 1. The .NO CONTROL CHARACTERS command does not accept control characters as normal text. Formats .CONTROL CHARACTERS .NO CONTROL CHARACTERS Abreviated formats .CC .NCC 4 Default .NO CONTROL CHARACTERS 3 .DATE The .DATE and .NO DATE commands control whether the current date appears in running heads. The date appears in the following format: 22 August 1992. The .SUBTITLE command and .LAYOUT commands must be included for .DATE to be effective. (See also .HEADERS ON and .SET DATE.) Formats .DATE .NO DATE Abreviated formats .D .ND 4 Default .NO DATE 3 .DISPLAY_APPENDIX The .DISPLAY APPENDIX command allows you to specify the form that the lettering (or numbering) of appendixes will take. The form you specify appears in the title, the page numbers, and the first character of header level numbers throughout the appendix. This command does not change any values; it affects only the way the values are displayed. (See also .APPENDIX and .NUMBER APPENDIX.) Format .DISPLAY APPENDIX y Abreviated format .DAX y 4 Parameter y One of the following one- or two-letter codes: Code Form of Sequence and Case D Decimal numbers O Octal numbers H Hexadecimal numbers RU Roman uppercase numerals RL Roman lowercase numerals RM Roman mixed case numerals - only first numeral is uppercase LU Letters, uppercase LL Letters, lowercase LM Letters, mixed case - only first letter is uppercase 4 Default Letters, uppercase (LU) 3 .DISPLAY_CHAPTER The .DISPLAY CHAPTER command allows you to specify the form that the numbering (or lettering) of chapters will take. The form you specify appears in the title, the page numbers, and the first character of header level numbers throughout the chapter. This command does not change any values; it affects only the way the values are displayed. (See also .CHAPTER and .NUMBER CHAPTER.) Format .DISPLAY CHAPTER y Abreviated format .DCH y 4 Parameter y One of the following one- or two-letter codes: Code Form of Sequence and Case D Decimal numbers O Octal numbers H Hexadecimal numbers RU Roman uppercase numerals RL Roman lowercase numerals RM Roman mixed case numerals - only first numeral is uppercase LU Letters, uppercase LL Letters, lowercase LM Letters, mixed case - only first letter is uppercase 4 Default Decimal numbers (D) 3 .DISPLAY_ELEMENTS The .DISPLAY ELEMENTS command allows you to specify the form that sequential numbering or lettering of items in a list will take. This command does not change any values; it affects only the way the values are displayed. (See also .LIST, .END LIST, and .NUMBER LIST.) Format .DISPLAY ELEMENTS ["x",] y [,"z"] (or ['x',] y [,'z']) Abreviated format .DLE ["x",] y [,"z"] (or ['x',] y [,'z']) 4 Parameters x A character, such as a left parenthesis or bracket, that you can specify to precede the number or letter. You must enclose the character in quotation marks (" ") or apostrophes (' '). y One of the following one- or two-letter codes: Code Form of Sequence and Case D Decimal numbers O Octal numbers H Hexadecimal numbers RU Roman uppercase numerals RL Roman lowercase numerals RM Roman mixed case numerals - only first numeral is uppercase LU Letters, uppercase LL Letters, lowercase LM Letters, mixed case - only first letter is uppercase z A character, such as a right parenthesis or bracket, that you can specify to follow the number or letter. You must enclose the character in quotation marks (" ") or apostrophes (' '). 4 Default A space for x, decimal numbers for y, and a period (.) for z 3 .DISPLAY_LEVELS The .DISPLAY LEVELS command allows you to specify the form that sequential numbering (or lettering) of section headers will take. You can control the form of individual numbers within a section number for a header (that is, those numbers preceding or following a dot). This command does not change any values; it affects only the way the values are displayed.(See also .HEADER LEVEL, .NUMBER LEVEL, and .STYLE HEADERS.) Default Header Level Numbering Command Nonchapter Chapter n Appendix A .HEADER LEVEL 1 1 n.1 A.1 .HEADER LEVEL 2 1.1 n.1.1 A.1.1 .HEADER LEVEL 3 1.1.1 n.1.1.1 A.1.1.1 Format .DISPLAY LEVELS [y1] [,y2]...[,y6] Abreviated format .DHL [y1][,y2]...[,y6] 4 Parameter y One of the following one- or two-letter codes; 1,2, ... 6 indicate positions of numbers (or letters) for a section header. The commas correspond to the dots in a printed section number. (See also .NUMBER LEVEL.) Code Form of Sequence and Case D Decimal numbers O Octal numbers H Hexadecimal numbers RU Roman uppercase numerals RL Roman lowercase numerals RM Roman mixed case numerals - only first numeral is uppercase LU Letters, uppercase LL Letters, lowercase LM Letters, mixed case - only first letter is uppercase 4 Default Decimal numbers (D) 4 Example Entering the command .DISPLAY LEVELS RU, LU, LL (roman numeral upper, letters uppercase, letters lowercase) would cause your headers to be displayed as follows: Command Nonchapter Chapter n Appendix A .HEADER LEVEL 1 I n.I A.I .HEADER LEVEL 2 I.A n.I.A A.I.A .HEADER LEVEL 3 I.A.a n.I.A.a A.I.A.a 3 .DISPLAY_NUMBER The .DISPLAY NUMBER command allows you to specify the form that sequential numbering (or lettering) of pages will take. This command does not change any values; it affects only the way the values are displayed. (See also .HEADERS ON, .NUMBER PAGE, .NO NUMBER, .LAYOUT, .NUMBER RUNNING, and .NO PAGING.) Format .DISPLAY NUMBER y Abreviated format .DNM y 4 Parameter y One of the following one- or two-letter codes: Code Form of Sequence and Case D Decimal numbers O Octal numbers H Hexadecimal numbers RU Roman uppercase numerals RL Roman lowercase numerals RM Roman mixed case numerals - only first numeral is uppercase LU Letters, uppercase LL Letters, lowercase LM Letters, mixed case - only first letter is uppercase 4 Default Decimal numbers (D) 3 .DISPLAY_SUBPAGE The .DISPLAY SUBPAGE command allows you to specify the form that sequential lettering (or numbering) of subpage characters will take. Subpage characters are the characters that are appended to the page numbers of subpages. This command does not change any values; it affects only the way the values are displayed. (See also .SUBPAGE and .NUMBER SUBPAGE.) Format .DISPLAY SUBPAGE y Abreviated format .DSP y 4 Parameter y One of the following one- or two-letter codes: Code Form of Sequence and Case D Decimal numbers O Octal numbers H Hexadecimal numbers RU Roman uppercase numerals RL Roman lowercase numerals RM Roman mixed case numerals - only first numeral is uppercase LU Letters, uppercase LL Letters, lowercase LM Letters, mixed case - only first letter is uppercase 4 Default Uppercase letters (LU) appended to the page number preceding the subpage 3 .ENABLE_BOLDING The .ENABLE BOLDING and .DISABLE BOLDING commands enable and disable the bolding function. You can perform bolding only if recognition of the Bold flag (*) is turned on and the bold function is enabled. Formats .ENABLE BOLDING .DISABLE BOLDING Abreviated formats .EBO .DBO 4 Default Operation of the bold function is initially enabled (.ENABLE BOLDING), but recognition of the Bold flag (*) is not turned on (.NO FLAGS BOLD). 3 .ENABLE_HYPHENATION The .ENABLE HYPHENATION and .DISABLE HYPHENATION commands enable and disable the hyphenation function. You can use hyphenation to close up excessive spacing between words. Extra spaces often are placed between words when margins are narrow and a line contains several long words. Formats .ENABLE HYPHENATION .DISABLE HYPHENATION Abreviated formats .EHY .DHY 4 Default Operation of the hyphenation function is initially enabled (.ENABLE HYPHENATION), but recognition of the Hyphenate flag (=) is not turned on (.NO FLAGS HYPHENATE). 3 .ENABLE_INDEXING The .ENABLE INDEXING and .DISABLE INDEXING commands enable and disable the operation of the indexing commands (.INDEX and .ENTRY), and the Index flag (>). Formats .ENABLE INDEXING .DISABLE INDEXING Abreviated formats .EIX .DIX 4 Default Operation of the index function is initially enabled (.ENABLE INDEXING), but recognition of the Index flag (>) is not turned on (.NO FLAGS INDEX). 3 .ENABLE_OVERSTRIKING The .ENABLE OVERSTRIKING and .DISABLE OVERSTRIKING commands enable and disable the overstrike function. You use the Overstrike flag (%) to create special characters that are not available on the terminal by overstriking any printing character with another. For example, you can overstrike a 7 with a hyphen to create a European 7. Formats .ENABLE OVERSTRIKING .DISABLE OVERSTRIKING Abreviated formats .EOV .DOV 4 Default Operation of the overstrike function is initially enabled (.ENABLE OVERSTRIKING), but recognition of the Overstrike flag (%) is not turned on (.NO FLAGS OVERSTRIKE). 3 .ENABLE_TOC These commands enable and disable DSR's collection of information for the table of contents. Formats .ENABLE TOC .DISABLE TOC Abreviated formats .ETC .DTC 4 Default Operation of the table of contents function is initially enabled (.ENABLE TOC). 3 .ENABLE_UNDERLINING The .ENABLE UNDERLINING and .DISABLE UNDERLINING commands enable and disable the underline function. You can perform underlining only if recognition of the Underline flag (&) is turned on and the underline function is enabled. Formats .ENABLE UNDERLINING .DISABLE UNDERLINING Abreviated formats .EUN .DUL 4 Default Operation of the underline function is initially enabled (.ENABLE UNDERLINING) and recognition of the Underline flag (&) is turned on (.FLAGS UNDERLINE). 3 .ENTRY The .ENTRY command creates an index entry without a page number reference. It is usually used for "See..." or "See also..." index entries. Format .ENTRY topic [>subtopic1... >subtopicn] Abreviated format .Y topic [>subtopic1... >subtopicn] 3 .FIGURE The .FIGURE command leaves room on a page for you to insert a figure later. You specify the number of blank lines you need, and DSR leaves that amount of space on the current page if there is enough room. If there is not enough room on the current page, DSR ends the page immediately and then puts the blank lines at the top of the next page. Format .FIGURE [n] Abreviated format .FG [n] 4 Parameter n The number of blank lines needed. Values of 0 or less are not valid and n cannot exceed the number of lines of text allowed on a page (this would be the page-length value associated with the .PAGE SIZE command minus any header lines, any forced blank spaces after the header information, and any bottom of the page information specified by .LAYOUT 1, .LAYOUT 2, or .LAYOUT 3). 4 Default .FIGURE 1 3 .FIGURE_DEFERRED The .FIGURE DEFERRED command leaves room on a page for you to insert a figure later. You specify the number of blank lines you need, and DSR leaves that amount of space on the current page if there is enough room. If there is not enough room on the current page, .FIGURE DEFERRED first adds enough text to complete the page and then puts the required number of blank lines at the top of the next page. Format .FIGURE DEFERRED [n] Abreviated format .FGD [n] 4 Parameter n The number of blank lines needed. Values of 0 or less are not valid and n cannot exceed the number of lines of text allowed on a page (this would be the page-length value associated with the .PAGE SIZE command minus any header lines, any forced blank spaces after the header information, and any bottom of the page information specified by .LAYOUT 1, .LAYOUT 2, or .LAYOUT 3). 4 Default .FIGURE DEFERRED 1 3 .FILL The .FILL command causes DSR to treat line endings exactly like spaces (see also .NO SPACE). Line-filling is the accumulation of words on a line until the addition of one more word would exceed the right margin. If .NO FILL is in effect, line endings in the input file are duplicated in the output file (see also .KEEP). Formats .FILL .NO FILL Abreviated formats .F .NF 4 Default .FILL 3 .FIRST_TITLE The .FIRST TITLE command allows running-head information to appear on the first page of a document with no chapters. (See also .HEADERS ON, .LAYOUT, .TITLE, .SUBTITLE, and .AUTOSUBTITLE.) Format .FIRST TITLE Abreviated format .FT 4 Default No running-head information on the first page 3 .FLAGS_ACCEPT The .FLAGS ACCEPT and .NO FLAGS ACCEPT commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Accept flag character (_). Formats .FLAGS ACCEPT [k] .NO FLAGS ACCEPT Abreviated formats .FL ACCEPT [k] .NFL ACCEPT 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .FLAGS ACCEPT - Recognition of the Accept flag character (_) is turned on. 3 .FLAGS_ALL The .FLAGS ALL and .NO FLAGS ALL commands function as master switches for all other .FLAGS/.NO FLAGS flag-name command settings, except the .FLAGS/.NO FLAGS COMMENT and .FLAGS/.NO FLAGS CONTROL commands. The .FLAGS ALL and .NO FLAGS ALL commands turn on and turn off recognition of all flags without disturbing other flag command settings. (An analogy for flag recognition is turning on a master switch [entering .FLAGS ALL] - those lights whose switches are in the ON position will go on and those whose switches are in the OFF position will not go on.) See also .ENABLE/.DISABLE BOLDING, HYPHENATION, INDEXING, OVERSTRIKING, and UNDERLINING commands. Formats .FLAGS ALL .NO FLAGS ALL .FLAGS .NO FLAGS Abreviated formats .FL .NFL 4 Default .FLAGS ALL 3 .FLAGS_BOLD The .FLAGS BOLD and .NO FLAGS BOLD commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Bold flag character (*). Formats .FLAGS BOLD [k] .NO FLAGS BOLD Abreviated formats .FL BOLD [k] .NFL BOLD 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .NO FLAGS BOLD - Recognition of the Bold flag character (*) is turned off. 3 .FLAGS_BREAK The .FLAGS BREAK and .NO FLAGS BREAK commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Break flag character (|). Formats .FLAGS BREAK [k] .NO FLAGS BREAK Abreviated formats .FL BREAK [k] .NFL BREAK 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .NO FLAGS BREAK - Recognition of the Break flag character (|) is turned off. 3 .FLAGS_CAPITALIZE The .FLAGS CAPITALIZE and .NO FLAGS CAPITALIZE commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Capitalize flag character (<). Formats .FLAGS CAPITALIZE [k] .NO FLAGS CAPITALIZE Abreviated formats .FL CAPITALIZE [k] .NFL CAPITALIZE 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .NO FLAGS CAPITALIZE - Recognition of the Capitalize flag character (<) is turned off. 3 .FLAGS_COMMENT The .FLAGS COMMENT and .NO FLAGS COMMENT commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Comment flag character (!). Formats .FLAGS COMMENT [k] .NO FLAGS COMMENT Abreviated formats .FL COMMENT [k] .NFL COMMENT 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .FLAGS COMMENT - Recognition of the Comment flag character (!) is turned on. 3 .FLAGS_CONTROL The .FLAGS CONTROL and .NO FLAGS CONTROL commands control recognition of the Control flag character (the period (.) that begins a DSR command). You can enter .FLAGS CONTROL to change the character that precedes the commands from a period (.) to a character of your choice. You can enter .NO FLAGS CONTROL to turn off recognition of the Control flag character. NOTE There is no way to reenable recognition of the Control flag once you enter the .NO FLAGS CONTROL command. Formats .FLAGS CONTROL [k] .NO FLAGS CONTROL Abreviated formats .FL CONTROL [k] .NFL CONTROL 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current Control flag character. 4 Default .FLAGS CONTROL - Recognition of the Control flag character (.) is turned on. 3 .FLAGS_HYPHENATE The .FLAGS HYPHENATE and .NO FLAGS HYPHENATE commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Hyphenate flag character (=). Formats .FLAGS HYPHENATE [k] .NO FLAGS HYPHENATE Abreviated formats .FL HYPHENATE [k] .NFL HYPHENATE 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .NO FLAGS HYPHENATE - Recognition of the Hyphenate flag character (=) is turned off. 3 .FLAGS_INDEX The .FLAGS INDEX and .NO FLAGS INDEX commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Index flag character (>). Formats .FLAGS INDEX [k] .NO FLAGS INDEX Abreviated formats .FL INDEX [k] .NFL INDEX 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .NO FLAGS INDEX - Recognition of the Index flag character (>) is turned off. 3 .FLAGS_LOWERCASE The .FLAGS LOWERCASE and .NO FLAGS LOWERCASE commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Lowercase flag character (\). Formats .FLAGS LOWERCASE [k] .NO FLAGS LOWERCASE Abreviated formats .FL LOWERCASE [k] .NFL LOWERCASE 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .FLAGS LOWERCASE - Recognition of the Lowercase flag character (\) is turned on. 3 .FLAGS_OVERSTRIKE The .FLAGS OVERSTRIKE and .NO FLAGS OVERSTRIKE commands enable and disable recognition of the Overstrike flag character (%). Formats .FLAGS OVERSTRIKE [k] .NO FLAGS OVERSTRIKE Abreviated formats .FL OVERSTRIKE [k] .NFL OVERSTRIKE 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .NO FLAGS OVERSTRIKE - Recognition of the Overstrike flag character (%) is turned off. 3 .FLAGS_PERIOD The .FLAGS PERIOD and .NO FLAGS PERIOD commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Period flag character (+). When the period flag is in effect, an extra space is inserted after the following punctuation marks: period (.), colon (:), question mark (?) and exclamation point (!). Formats .FLAGS PERIOD [k] .NO FLAGS PERIOD Abreviated formats .FL PERIOD [k] .NFL PERIOD 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .PERIOD FLAG - Recognition of the Period flag character (+) is turned on. 3 .FLAGS_SPACE The .FLAGS SPACE and .NO FLAGS SPACE commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Space flag character (#). Formats .FLAGS SPACE [k] .NO FLAGS SPACE Abreviated formats .FL SPACE [k] .NFL SPACE 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .FLAGS SPACE - Recognition of the Space flag character (#) is turned on. 3 .FLAGS_SUBINDEX The .FLAGS SUBINDEX and .NO FLAGS SUBINDEX commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Subindex flag (>). You can also use the .FLAGS SUBINDEX command to change the Subindex flag to another character. If you enter .NO FLAGS SUBINDEX, the command will cause a right angle bracket (>) to be printed as part of your indexed text, instead of causing subindexing. Formats .FLAGS SUBINDEX [k] .NO FLAGS SUBINDEX Abreviated formats .FL SUBINDEX [k] .NFL SUBINDEX 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .FLAGS SUBINDEX - Recognition of the Subindex flag character (>) within .INDEX or .ENTRY commands is turned on. The Subindex flag character is always taken as normal text outside an .INDEX or .ENTRY command. 3 .FLAGS_SUBSTITUTE The .FLAGS SUBSTITUTE and .NO FLAGS SUBSTITUTE commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Substitute flag character ($). The default Substitute flag character ($) or any replacement character you specify must be used in pairs. Formats .FLAGS SUBSTITUTE [k] .NO FLAGS SUBSTITUTE Abreviated formats .FL SUBSTITUTE [k] .NFL SUBSTITUTE 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .NO FLAGS SUBSTITUTE - Recognition of the Substitute flag character ($) is turned off. 3 .FLAGS_UNDERLINE The .FLAGS UNDERLINE and .NO FLAGS UNDERLINE commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Underline flag character (&). Formats .FLAGS UNDERLINE [k] .NO FLAGS UNDERLINE Abreviated formats .FL UNDERLINE [k] .NFL UNDERLINE 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .FLAGS UNDERLINE - Recognition of the Underline flag character (&) is turned on. 3 .FLAGS_UPPERCASE The .FLAGS UPPERCASE and .NO FLAGS UPPERCASE commands turn on and turn off recognition of the Uppercase flag (^). Formats .FLAGS UPPERCASE [k] .NO FLAGS UPPERCASE Abreviated formats .FL UPPERCASE [k] .NFL UPPERCASE 4 Parameter k Specifies a character to replace the current flag character. 4 Default .FLAGS UPPERCASE - Recognition of the Uppercase flag character (^) is turned on. 3 .FOOTNOTE The .FOOTNOTE command places the text following it at the bottom of the current page if there is room. If there is not enough room on the current page for the entire footnote, DSR places the entire note at the bottom of the next page. The .END FOOTNOTE command ends the footnote and restores any case, fill, justify, spacing, or margin settings that you might have changed within the footnote. The right margin of the footnote will be the same as the right margin in effect for the document at the time the footnote is created. If you change the right margin of the document but want the right margin of all footnotes to be the same, enter the .RIGHT MARGIN command immediately after each .FOOTNOTE command to set the same right margin for each footnote. The left margin setting of the footnote is defaulted to 0. Formats .FOOTNOTE [n] .END FOOTNOTE Abreviated formats .FN [n] .EFN 4 Parameter n The number of lines the footnote will occupy. This argument is included only for compatibility with older versions of RUNOFF and is not necessary or recommended. 3 .HEADER_LEVEL The .HEADER LEVEL command allows you to specify both a section number and a section title. Successive .HEADER LEVEL commands of the same value (all .HEADER LEVEL 1's for example) cause the section numbers to increase sequentially. This happens at all six levels of headers. If your current section is in Chapter 2 and is numbered 2.5.2.4 (a header level 3), then the following numbering would result depending upon the .HEADER LEVEL command you used: o .HL4 would number the next section 2.5.2.4.1 o .HL3 (or .HL without a value, since .HL defaults to the current level) would number the next section 2.5.2.5 o .HL2 would number the next section 2.5.3 o .HL1 would number the next section 2.6 (See also .DISPLAY LEVELS, .NUMBER LEVEL, .SET LEVEL, and .STYLE HEADERS.) Following is a summary of default header level numbering for three levels of three different types of documents: Default Header Level Numbering Nonchapter Chapter n Appendix A .HEADER LEVEL 1 1 n.1 A.1 .HEADER LEVEL 2 1.1 n.1.1 A.1.1 .HEADER LEVEL 3 1.1.1 n.1.1.1 A.1.1.1 Format .HEADER LEVEL [[+/-]n] [title] Abreviated format .HL [[+/-]n] [title] 4 Parameters n A number from 1 to 6 that specifies the level of the header. Do not confuse the level numbers with the header numbers that are printed in your document just to the left of the header title. +n Adds n to the current header level number. -n Subtracts n from the current header level number. title The name of the section you are now starting. Do not precede the title with a semicolon (;). 4 Default If you enter .HEADER LEVEL without specifying a level number, you get the current header level. All header levels, .HEADER LEVEL 1 to .HEADER LEVEL 6, begin their numbering with 1 unless you specify another value with .NUMBER LEVEL. 3 .HEADERS_ON The .HEADERS ON and .NO HEADERS commands restore and cancel, respectively, the capability of having one or two lines of information at the top of a page. These lines indicate the content of the page and the page number. They are called running heads, which you should not confuse with section heads (specified with .HEADER LEVEL commands). Formats .HEADERS [ON] .NO HEADERS Abreviated formats .HD [ON] .NHD .HD 4 Default .HEADERS ON 3 .HEADERS_case The .HEADERS case commands specify the case of the word "page" that precedes the page number. The commands .HEADERS UPPER, .HEADERS LOWER and .HEADERS MIXED produce, respectively, PAGE, page, and Page. In an index, these commands also affect the word "index" that is part of the page number, for example, Page Index- 3. The command normally takes effect on the next page. Formats .HEADERS UPPER .HEADERS LOWER .HEADERS MIXED Abreviated formats .HD UPPER .HD LOWER .HD MIXED 4 Default .HEADERS MIXED 3 .INDENT The .INDENT command causes the first line of text following it to begin at a position relative to the left margin. Format .INDENT [[-]n] Abreviated format .I [[-]n] 4 Parameters n Specifies how many character positions to the right of the left margin setting the first line of text will begin. -n Specifies how many character positions to the left of the left margin setting the first line of text will begin. .INDENT cannot begin to the left of character position 0. 4 Default If you enter .INDENT without a number, you get the indent value that you specified with .PARAGRAPH or .SET PARAGRAPH. If you did not enter either of these paragraph commands, you get an indentation of 5. 3 .INDEX The .INDEX command creates an index entry with a page number reference. Format .INDEX topic [>subtopic1... >subtopicn] Abreviated format .X topic [>subtopic1... >subtopicn] 3 .JUSTIFY The .JUSTIFY command causes DSR to insert exactly enough space between words so that the last character reaches the right margin. The .NO JUSTIFY command disables justification. Formats .JUSTIFY .NO JUSTIFY Abreviated formats .J .NJ 4 Default .JUSTIFY 3 .KEEP The .KEEP command allows you to keep blank lines that are present in the input file, in the output file when .NO FILL is in effect. Normally, multiple blank lines in the input file are discarded in the output file while .NO FILL is in effect. .NO KEEP also discards blank lines when .NO FILL is in effect. (See also .LITERAL.) Formats .KEEP .NO KEEP Abreviated formats .K .NK 4 Default .NO KEEP 3 .LAYOUT The .LAYOUT command rearranges running-head and running-foot information on pages. (See the .HEADERS ON command.) When the default .LAYOUT operates, page numbering is not displayed on the first page, it starts on page 2. Format .LAYOUT n1 [,n2] Abreviated format .LO n1 [,n2] 4 Parameters n1 A number from 0 to 3 that specifies one of the following arrangements of running head information: .LAYOUT 0 Restores the standard arrangement of title and subtitle in the upper left of a page, and page number and date in the upper right. .LAYOUT 1 Titles and subtitles are centered at the tops of pages. Page numbers are centered at the bottom. No date is output. .LAYOUT 2 Titles and subtitles appear at the top right of right-hand (odd-numbered) pages and at the top left of left-hand (even-numbered) pages. Page numbers are centered at the bottom. No date is output. .LAYOUT 3 Gives the standard page arrangement for title and subtitle (as in .LAYOUT 0), but with the addition of running-page numbers centered at the bottom of pages between two hyphens (for example, - 23 -). Running-page numbers are consecutive through the entire document rather than within chapters; they are not affected by the .NO NUMBER or .NUMBER PAGE commands. (See also .NUMBER RUNNING.) n2 Specifies how many lines below the last line of text on a page the number will appear. You must specify n2 if n1 is 1, 2, or 3. If n1 is 0, you cannot specify a value for n2. 4 Default .LAYOUT 0 3 .LEFT_MARGIN The .LEFT MARGIN command sets the left margin to the specified position. Format .LEFT MARGIN [[+/-]n] Abreviated format .LM [[+/-]n] 4 Parameters n Specifies the number of the character position of the left margin. For example, .LEFT MARGIN 0 sets the left margin just to the left of the first character position. +n Sets the left margin n character positions to the right of the current left margin. -n Sets the left margin n character positions to the left of the current left margin. 4 Default .LEFT MARGIN 0 3 .LIST The .LIST command specifies the beginning of a list by resetting the left margin farther to the right, by setting a .SKIP command value to take effect before each item in the list, and by executing .TEST PAGE. Use the .LIST ELEMENT command to specify each item in the list. .LIST ELEMENT commands also give you numbers or letters in sequence in the left margin or let you substitute a single character of your choice for each of the numbers or letters (for example, the lowercase letter o, which is known as a "bullet"). (See also .DISPLAY ELEMENTS and .NUMBER LIST.) The .END LIST command ends a list, restoring any fill, justify, case, margin, or spacing settings that were in effect before you entered the most recent .LIST command. You can also specify a value with .END LIST that puts blank lines after the last item in the list (as with .SKIP). Formats .LIST [[-]n] ["x"] .END LIST [[-]n] .LIST [[-]n] ['x'] .END LIST [[-]n] Abreviated formats .LS [[-]n] ["x"] .ELS [[-]n] .LS [[-]n] ['x'] .ELS [[-]n] 4 Parameters n With .LIST, specifies the number of blank lines to appear before each item. Each blank line can result in additional blank lines if the .SPACING setting is greater than 1. (See .SKIP n.) With .END LIST, behaves the same as n with .LIST, however, the blank lines appear after the final item in the current list. -n With .LIST, pushes the next line of list text to within n lines of the bottom of the current page by inserting blank lines. (See .SKIP -n and .BLANK -n.) With .END LIST, pushes the next line of current list text to within n lines of the bottom of the current page by inserting blank lines. (See .SKIP -n and .BLANK -n.) "x" A character enclosed in quotation marks ("x") or apostrophes ('x') that you can specify to appear at the beginning of each list item. 4 Defaults o If you omit n from either .LIST or .END LIST, you get the .SKIP value associated with .PARAGRAPH or .SET PARAGRAPH or 1 (if you have not specified such a value). o If you omit "x," you get a sequence of decimal numbers beginning with 1, or you get another kind of sequence if you enter the .DISPLAY ELEMENTS command after the .LIST. 3 .LIST_ELEMENT The .LIST ELEMENT command specifies the beginning of each item in a list. If you specify a character in a .LIST command, it appears, followed by two spaces, before each item. Otherwise, a sequence of numbers or letters, as defined in the .DISPLAY ELEMENTS command, appears when you enter successive .LIST ELEMENT commands. If you have not entered the .DISPLAY ELEMENTS command, you will get a sequence of decimal numbers, each followed by a period and two spaces. (See .LIST, .END LIST, .DISPLAY ELEMENTS, and .NUMBER LIST.) Format .LIST ELEMENT; text Abreviated format .LE; text 4 Parameter text The text that will appear after the list element delimiter. 4 Defaults o If you have not entered the .LIST command with a specified character to appear in the left margin, you will get the kind of sequence that you specified in .DISPLAY ELEMENTS. o If you have not entered the .DISPLAY ELEMENTS command, you will get decimal numbers, each followed by a period and two spaces. 3 .LITERAL The .LITERAL command allows you to have your text formatted exactly as you have typed it. This means that you will get a blank line in the output file wherever a blank line occurs in the input file. (If the value specified by the .SPACING command is anything other than one, you will get the spacing value that you specified.) Commands are not recognized when .LITERAL is in effect and are treated as ordinary text if you enter them. DSR flags are also treated as normal text. Tab stops set prior to the .LITERAL command, however, are still in effect within the block of .LITERAL text (see .TAB STOPS). You must enter .END LITERAL when you want DSR to resume normal formatting. If you want to have flags in effect, use the .KEEP and .NO FILL commands instead of the .LITERAL command. Formats .LITERAL [n] .END LITERAL Abreviated formats .LT [n] .EL 4 Parameter n The number of lines to be produced. This argument is included only for compatibility with older versions of RUNOFF and is not necessary or recommended. 3 .NO_SPACE The .NO SPACE command prevents the insertion of the end-of-line space for one line of text only, causing the characters at the end of one line and the beginning of the next to be adjacent. Without the .NO SPACE command, when .FILL is in effect, DSR treats the end of an input line exactly like a space. That is, it inserts a space in the output file at the place where each input line ended (this is the meaning of "fill\nospace"). If you ever have occasion to use this command, you should enter it immediately after the end-of-line space that you want to affect. Format .NO SPACE Abreviated format .NSP 4 Default You get the normal space when you press the Return key unless you execute .NO SPACE. 3 .NOTE The .NOTE command highlights a portion of text by narrowing the margin settings, centering the text on the page, and printing a title centered over the text. The .END NOTE command restores the fill, justify, case, margin, and spacing settings that were in effect just before you entered the .NOTE. Formats .NOTE [text] .END NOTE [[-]n] Abreviated formats .NT [text] .EN [[-]n] 4 Parameters n Specifies the number of blank lines to follow the note. If .SPACING has a value greater than 1, you will get more lines than you specified. (See also .SKIP n.) -n Specifies that the next line of text be pushed to within n lines of the bottom of the current page by the insertion of blank lines. (See also .SKIP -n and .BLANK -n.) text A title for the note. If omitted, the word NOTE appears in uppercase letters over the text. 4 Default The word NOTE appears in uppercase letters over the text if you do not specify a title. The .END NOTE command leaves 1 blank line after the note. 3 .NUMBER_APPENDIX The .NUMBER APPENDIX command allows you to specify an identifying letter with which a sequence of appendixes will begin. The next .APPENDIX command starts the sequence. Subsequent .APPENDIX commands cause appendixes to be lettered in alphabetic order. See also .DISPLAY APPENDIX. Format .NUMBER APPENDIX [[+/-]n] Abreviated format .NMAX [[+/-]n] 4 Parameters n The character that specifies what the next appendix letter will be. You can specify the letter itself (A) or you can specify a number corresponding (in order) to the letter that will identify the appendix. For example, 1=A, 26=Z, 27=AA, 28=AB. +n Specifies how many alphabetically ordered letters past the current appendix letter the next .APPENDIX character will be. For example, if the current appendix is APPENDIX B, then .NUMBER APPENDIX +2 will cause the next .APPENDIX to produce APPENDIX D. -n Specifies how many alphabetically ordered letters before the current appendix letter the next .APPENDIX letter will be. 4 Default Sequential uppercase lettering, beginning with A. 3 .NUMBER_CHAPTER The .NUMBER CHAPTER command allows you to specify the number with which a sequence of chapters will begin. The next .CHAPTER command starts the sequence. Subsequent .CHAPTER commands will cause each chapter to be numbered one higher than the previous chapter. (See also .DISPLAY CHAPTER.) Format .NUMBER CHAPTER [[+/-]n] Abreviated format .NMCH [[+/-]n] 4 Parameters n The number that the next .CHAPTER will have. Entering the .NUMBER CHAPTER command without an argument gives Chapter 1. +n Adds n to the number of the most recently issued .CHAPTER. The result is the number that the next .CHAPTER will have. -n Subtracts n from the number of the most recently entered .CHAPTER. The result is the number that the next .CHAPTER will have. 4 Default Sequential decimal numbering, beginning with 1. 3 .NUMBER_LEVEL The .NUMBER LEVEL command allows you to specify the beginning number of a sequence of headers. Enter this command immediately before the first .HEADER LEVEL command that you want to affect. Subsequent .HEADER LEVEL commands will each be one higher than the preceding one according to its level (see .HEADER LEVEL). (See also .STYLE HEADERS and .DISPLAY LEVELS.) Format .NUMBER LEVEL [[+/-]n1] [,[+/-]n2]...[,[+/-]n6] Abreviated format .NMLV [[+/-]n1] [,[+/-]n2]...[,[+/-]n6] 4 Parameters n1,n2,...n6 Indicate positioned numbers in a section header. The commas correspond to the dots in the printed section number. For example, to set the next .HEADER LEVEL to 3.5.2.4, you would enter the following commands: .NUMBER LEVEL 3,5,2,4 .HEADER LEVEL +nN Adds n to the current value of the parameter N. -nN Subtracts n from the current value of the parameter N. 4 Default Sequential decimal numbering, beginning with 1. 3 .NUMBER_LIST The .NUMBER LIST command allows you to specify, anywhere in a list, the number with which a sequence of items in a list will begin. Enter this command just before the .LIST ELEMENT command that you want to affect. Subsequent list elements will each have a number that is one greater than the number for the preceding .LIST ELEMENT command. (See also .DISPLAY ELEMENTS, with which you can specify the form the number will take.) Format .NUMBER LIST n Abreviated format .NMLS n 4 Parameter n Specifies a string of characters or the number with which a following sequence of items in a list will begin. You must enter .LIST ELEMENT following the .NUMBER LIST command. 4 Default Sequential decimal numbering, beginning with 1. 3 .NUMBER_PAGE The .NO NUMBER command suspends normal page numbering. The .NUMBER PAGE command resumes normal page numbering, having kept track of the numbering while .NO NUMBER was in effect; or it allows you to specify the beginning of a new number sequence by specifying a number for the next page. (See also .NUMBER RUNNING, .DISPLAY NUMBER, .NO PAGING, and .HEADERS ON.) Formats .NUMBER PAGE [[+/-]n] .NO NUMBER Abreviated formats .NMPG [[+/-]n] .NNM 4 Parameters n The number that the next page will have. +n Sets the number of the next page to n more than the number of the current page. -n Sets the number of the next page to n less than the number of the current page. 4 Default Sequential decimal numbering, beginning with 1 or chapter number-1 or appendix letter-1. 3 .NUMBER_RUNNING The .NUMBER RUNNING command allows you to specify the beginning of a new sequence of running page numbers. This command affects page numbers only if you have entered a .LAYOUT command with an n1 value of 3. (See .LAYOUT, .HEADERS ON, and .NO NUMBER.) Format .NUMBER RUNNING [[+/-]n] Abreviated format .NMR [[+/-]n] 4 Parameters n The running number that the next page will have. +n Sets the running number of the next page to n more than the running number of the current page. -n Sets the running number of the next page to n less than the running number of the current page. 4 Default No running page numbers. 3 .NUMBER_SUBPAGE The .NUMBER SUBPAGE command allows you to specify the beginning of a new sequence of subpage numbers, for example, 1-16A, 1-16B, 1-16C, and so on. This command affects only the letters that the .SUBPAGE command appends to the normally numeric page number. .NUMBER SUBPAGE takes effect on the next page. (See also .SUBPAGE and .DISPLAY SUBPAGE.) Format .NUMBER SUBPAGE [[+/-]n] Abreviated format .NMSPG [[+/-]n] 4 Parameters n The subpage letter that will be appended to the number of the next page. You can specify the letter itself (A) or you can specify a number corresponding (in order) to the letter that the subpage will have. For example, 1=A, 26=Z, 27=AA, 28=AB. +n Specifies how many alphabetically ordered letters past the current subpage letter the next subpage letter will be. For example, if the current subpage is page 3-12E, then .NUMBER SUBPAGE +2 will cause the next subpage to be numbered 3-12G. -n Specifies how many alphabetically ordered letters before the current subpage letter the next subpage letter will be. 4 Default Sequential uppercase lettering, beginning with A. 3 .PAGE The .PAGE command starts a new page. A page must have either text or a .FIGURE DEFERRED command on it for the.PAGE command to create a new page. Consecutive .PAGE commands do not create blank pages. Format .PAGE Abreviated format .PG 3 .PAGE_SIZE The .PAGE SIZE command sets the page "frame" by specifying the page length (the maximum number of lines of text on a page) and the page width for the running heads. (Compare with .RIGHT MARGIN, which sets the text width.) The width component of .PAGE SIZE and the value established by .RIGHT MARGIN are separate values. Format .PAGE SIZE [[+/-]n1] [,[+/-]n2] Abreviated format .PS [[+/-]n1] [,[+/-]n2] 4 Parameters n1 (Length) is the maximum number of lines on a page; n1 cannot be smaller than 13. +n1 Increases the current page length by n1 lines. -n1 Decreases the current page length by n1 lines. n2 (Width) is the maximum number of characters on a line for running heads; n2 cannot be larger than 150. +n2 Increases the current page width by n2 characters. -n2 Decreases the current page width by n2 characters. 4 Default .PAGE SIZE 58,70 3 .PAGING The .PAGING command enables paging. The .NO PAGING command disables it. Formats .PAGING .NO PAGING Abreviated formats .PA .NPA 4 Default .PAGING 3 .PARAGRAPH The .PARAGRAPH command controls spacing and page placement associated with the creation of paragraphs. The .PARAGRAPH command executes .TEST PAGE, followed by .SKIP and .INDENT. (See also .SET PARAGRAPH.) Format .PARAGRAPH [[-]n1 [,[-]n2 [,n3]]] Abreviated format .P [[-]n1 [,[-]n2 [,n3]]] The parameters n1, n2, and n3 are identical to the values of the .SET PARAGRAPH command. If you choose not to use one of these optional parameters, you must use a comma as a placeholder for the missing parameter in the parameter list. 4 Parameters n1 = spaces indented (The default is 5.) Specifies (like .INDENT) how many character positions to the right of the left margin setting the first line of text will begin. -n1 Specifies how many character positions to the left of the left margin setting the first line of text will begin; -n1 cannot, however, cause the text to begin to the left of character position 0. n2 = vertical spacing (The default is 1.) Specifies (like .SKIP) the number of blank lines you want inserted before the paragraph. You get additional blank lines if the .SPACING value is greater than 1 (see .SKIP, .SPACING). -n2 Specifies that the next line of text be pushed to within n2 lines of the bottom of the current page by the insertion of blank lines. Every line but the last one retains the line spacing (.SPACING value) that follows it. n3 = test page lines (The default is 2.) Specifies (like .TEST PAGE) the number of lines of text required to be on one page. This parameter, unlike the .TEST PAGE command, takes into account any blank lines that the .SPACING command is routinely inserting after each line of text. If there is not enough room on the current page to accommodate that many lines, DSR puts the text on the next page. You can cancel this function by specifying 0 for n3. 4 Defaults o .PARAGRAPH 5,1,2 o If you enter .PARAGRAPH without one or more of the n values, you get the corresponding setting from the previous .PARAGRAPH or .SET PARAGRAPH that you entered. o If you enter .PARAGRAPH without one or more of the n values and if you have not set values in any previous .PARAGRAPH or .SET PARAGRAPH that you might have entered, you get one or more of the following: n1=5 n2=1 n3=2 The following table shows how to change the default values from 5 for spaces indented, 1 for vertical spaces, and 2 for test page lines: Format Actual Arguments .PARAGRAPH 5,1,2 .PARAGRAPH ,,4 5,1,4 .PARAGRAPH 3 3,1,2 .PARAGRAPH ,2 5,2,2 3 .PERIOD DSR normally adds an extra space after any of the following punctuation marks in your text: period (.), colon (:), question mark (?), and exclamation point (!). The .NO PERIOD command cancels the extra space that DSR inserts after any of the punctuation marks listed in the previous paragraph. The .NO PERIOD command is used to differentiate between punctuation used as part of a sentence, and punctuation used as part of a DSR command. The .PERIOD command restores the routine insertion of an extra space following any of the punctuation marks listed in the previous paragraph. Formats .PERIOD .NO PERIOD Abreviated formats .PR .NPR 4 Default .PERIOD 3 .REPEAT The .REPEAT command allows you to specify up to 150 characters to be printed a specified number of times, either horizontally or vertically. The text will be repeated horizontally when .FILL is in effect, and vertically when .NO FILL is in effect. Format .REPEAT n "x" (or n 'x') Abreviated format .RPT n "x" (or n 'x') 4 Parameters n The number of times you want the characters printed. x A string of up to 150 characters. You must enclose the characters within quotation marks (" ") or apostrophes (' '). 3 .REQUIRE The .REQUIRE command allows you to process several DSR files at the same time and merge them in an output file. Format .REQUIRE "filespec" (or 'filespec') Abreviated format .REQ "filespec" (or 'filespec') 4 Parameter filespec A file specification enclosed in quotation marks or apostrophes. If you just specify a file name, the default file type is .RNO. If you do not supply a full file specification, DSR uses your default device and directory. If you want to include (.REQUIRE) files from other devices or directories, you must specify the full file specification. 3 .RESTORE This command, when used with the .SAVE command, maintains the formatting context of a document for the user. The files produced by the DSR utilities make changes to the formatting context. In order not to disturb the user's context, the .RNT and .RNX files execute .SAVE and .RESTORE commands. The .RESTORE command restores the formatting information saved by the last-issued .SAVE command. .SAVE/ .RESTORE pairs may be nested up to 10 pairs deep. Format .RESTORE Abreviated format .RE 3 .RIGHT The .RIGHT command positions a single line of text relative to the right margin. (See also .CENTER.) Formats .RIGHT [[-]n]; text .RIGHT [[-]n] Abreviated formats .R [[-]n]; text .R [[-]n] 4 Parameters n Specifies how many character positions to the left of the right margin setting the line will be indented. -n Specifies the number of character positions to the right of the right margin setting that the line will extend to. text The text to be positioned relative to the right margin. No other DSR commands can follow this text on a line. 4 Default If you enter .RIGHT without a value, you get a 0, which will push the line of text to the right margin. 3 .RIGHT_MARGIN The .RIGHT MARGIN command sets the right margin to the position that you specify. This is the position to which a line of text normally extends. If .JUSTIFY is in effect, the .RIGHT MARGIN value is the position against which text is justified. If .NO JUSTIFY is in effect, the .RIGHT MARGIN value specifies the maximum number of characters on any text line. (Compare with .PAGE SIZE, which sets the page width for running heads.) Format .RIGHT MARGIN [[+/-]n] Abreviated format .RM [[+/-]n] 4 Parameters n Specifies the character position of the new right margin; n must be greater than the value for the left margin. (For example, .RIGHT MARGIN 60 sets the right margin just to the right of the 60th character position.) The maximum value of n is 150. +n Sets the right margin n character positions to the right of the current right margin. -n Sets the right margin n character positions to the left of the current right margin. 4 Defaults o If you do not enter the .RIGHT MARGIN command, you get .RIGHT MARGIN 70. o If you enter .RIGHT MARGIN without a value, you get the default value 70. 3 .SAVE This command, when used with the .RESTORE command, maintains the formatting context of a document for the user. The files produced by the DSR utilities make changes to the formatting context. In order not to disturb the user's context, the .RNT and .RNX files execute .SAVE and .RESTORE commands. The .SAVE command stores information about the current RUNOFF formatting context; this includes DSR defaults and DSR commands and flags issued by the user. The .RESTORE command restores the formatting information saved by the last-issued .SAVE command. .SAVE/ .RESTORE pairs may be nested up to 10 pairs deep. Format .SAVE Abreviated format .SA 3 .SEND_TOC The .SEND TOC command allows you to insert DSR commands, DSR flags, and text into the table of contents (.RNT) file. The items that you insert affect the appearance of the table of contents. For example, you can send emphasis flag characters to cause bolding and underlining in the table of contents. Format .SEND TOC text Abreviated format .STC text 4 Parameter text Specifies the DSR command, DSR flag, or text that you are sending to the table of contents. 3 .SET_DATE The .SET DATE and .SET TIME commands let you specify a date and time to be inserted in your file when you issue the Substitute flag pair, $$, with any of the appropriate date or time parameters. .SET DATE also sets the date for the .DATE command, which causes the date to appear in running heads. Formats .SET DATE d1 ,d2 ,d3 .SET TIME t1 ,t2 ,t3 Abreviated formats .SDT d1 ,d2 ,d3 .STM t1 ,t2 ,t3 4 Parameters d1 A number specifying the day of the month d2 A number specifying the month of the year d3 A number specifying the year (either four digits or the last two digits of the year) t1 A number specifying the hour of the day t2 A number specifying minutes past the hour t3 A number specifying seconds past the minute If you precede any of these values with a plus sign (+) or a minus sign (-), you will change the corresponding current value by adding to or subtracting from it the value following the + or -. 4 Defaults o If you do not enter .SET DATE or .SET TIME, entering a $$time, $$date, or any of the appropriate date or time parameters with the substitute flag pair ($$) will give you the date or time that DSR began processing the file. o If you enter either of these .SET commands, you can retain a previous value by omitting its value from the command. You must, however, type any comma that would have followed it. o If you enter either command without specifying any values for it, you will get the current date or the time as of the second the command is executed. 3 .SET_LEVEL The .SET LEVEL command allows you to preset the level of the next section head without entering a .HEADER LEVEL command (see .HEADER LEVEL). Format .SET LEVEL [+/-]n Abreviated format .SL [+/-]n 4 Parameters n Specifies the level for the next .HEADER LEVEL command. +n Makes the level for the next .HEADER LEVEL command n more than the current level. -n Makes the level for the next .HEADER LEVEL command n less than the current level. 3 .SET_PARAGRAPH The .SET PARAGRAPH command allows you to set values for .PARAGRAPH without entering .PARAGRAPH. The .SET PARAGRAPH command can be especially useful if you plan to execute .AUTOPARAGRAPH or .AUTOTABLE. (See .PARAGRAPH.) Format .SET PARAGRAPH [[-]n1 [,[-]n2 [,n3]]] Abreviated format .SPR [[-]n1 [,[-]n2 [,n3]]] The parameters n1, n2, and n3 are identical to the values of the .PARAGRAPH command. If you choose not to use one of these optional parameters, you must use a comma as a placeholder for the missing parameter in the parameter list. 4 Parameters n1 = spaces indented (The default is 5.) Specifies (like .INDENT) how many character positions to the right of the .LEFT MARGIN setting the first line of text will begin. -n1 Specifies how many character positions to the left of the .LEFT MARGIN setting the first line of text will begin; -n1 cannot, however, cause the text to begin to the left of character position 0. n2 = vertical spacing (The default is 1.) Specifies (like .SKIP) the number of blank lines you want inserted before the paragraph. You get additional blank lines if the .SPACING value is greater than 1. -n2 Specifies that the next line of text be pushed to within n2 lines of the bottom of the current page by the insertion of blank lines. Every line but the last one retains the line spacing (.SPACING value) that follows it. n3 = test page lines (The default is 2.) Specifies (like .TEST PAGE) the number of lines of text required to be on one page. Unlike the .TEST PAGE command itself, n3 takes into account any blank lines that .SPACING routinely inserts after each line of text. If there is not enough room on the current page to accommodate that many lines, DSR puts the text on the next page. You can cancel this function by specifying 0 for n3. 3 .SKIP The .SKIP command inserts a multiple of the number of blank lines that has been specified by the .SPACING command. Contrast this with .BLANK, which inserts only the number of blank lines specified with the .BLANK command itself. (See .BLANK.) Format .SKIP [[-]n] Abreviated format .S [[-]n] 4 Parameters n The number of .SPACING lines you want inserted. For example, if you have specified a .SPACING value of two lines and you enter .SKIP without an n value, DSR will insert two blank lines (the .SPACING value). If you enter .SKIP 2, DSR will insert four blank lines (2 times the .SPACING value), and so on. -n Specifies that the next line of text be pushed to within n lines of the bottom of the current page by the insertion of blank lines. Every line but the last one retains the line spacing (.SPACING value) that follows it. 4 Default If you enter no value for .SKIP, and you have entered no .SPACING command, you get .SKIP 1. 3 .SPACING The .SPACING command changes the amount of spacing between lines of text. Format .SPACING n Abreviated format .SP n 4 Parameter n The amount of spacing that you want between lines of text. For example, 1 denotes single spacing (no blank lines between lines of text). You must specify n, which must be within the range of 1 to 5, inclusively. 4 Default If you do not enter a .SPACING command, you get single spacing (.SPACING 1). 3 .STYLE_HEADERS The .STYLE HEADERS command changes the format and placement of the text portion of section heads (that is, the .HEADER LEVEL n text). Format .STYLE HEADERS [n1] [,n2]...[,n9] Abreviated format .STHL [n1] [,n2]...[,n9] 4 Parameters n1 (The default is 3.) Specifies the lowest-numbered header level to have the section title run-in to the paragraph that it heads. The text immediately follows the header title on the same line instead of beginning a new paragraph. All higher-numbered levels also have run-in formats. If n1=4, then .HEADER LEVEL 4, 5, and 6 titles are run into the main text. All lower levels will have the title separated from the text by blank lines (see parameter n7 for number of blank lines). n2 (The default is 1.) Specifies the highest-numbered header level to have its title printed entirely in uppercase. All lower-numbered levels will also have titles entirely in uppercase. If n2=4, then .HEADER LEVEL 1, 2, 3, and 4 will have titles in uppercase. n3 (The default is 6.) Specifies the highest-numbered header level to have only the first letter of each word capitalized in the title. All lower- numbered levels will also have titles in mixed format. If n3=6, all levels will have this case format. All uppercase takes precedence over initial capital letters, if there is a conflict. n4 (The default is 7.) Specifies the lowest-numbered header level not to have a section number to the left of its title. All higher-numbered levels will also not have section numbers to the left of their titles. Because there are only 6 header levels, the default of 7 indicates that all headers numbered. n5 (The default is 7.) Specifies the lowest numbered non-run-in header level to have its title centered. All higher-numbered non-run-in levels will also have their titles centered. Because there are only 6 header levels, the default value of 7 indicates that no header titles are centered. n6 (The default is 3.) Specifies the number of blank lines you want before section heads. n7 (The default is 1.) Specifies the number of blank lines you want after non-run-in section heads before the text is printed. n8 (The default is 9.) Specifies the number of lines you want to have available on the current page for the test page issued by .HEADER LEVEL. Note that n8 takes into account any blank lines that .SPACING routinely inserts after each line of text (unlike .TEST PAGE). (See also .SKIP.) n9 (The default is 2.) Specifies the number of spaces you want between the section number and the section title. The maximum value is 75. 4 Defaults If you do not specify a value for any given n, DSR supplies the following default values: n1=3 Run-in titles for header levels 3 to 6. n2=1 Titles in all uppercase for header level 1 only. n3=6 Titles with only the first letter of every word in uppercase for header level 2 to header level 6. n4=7 A sequence of numbers (or letters) preceding the section title. (See .DISPLAY LEVELS.) n5=7 Titles printed starting at the left margin (flush left), not centered. n6=3 Three blank lines before each header. n7=1 One blank line after each header. n8=9 Seven more than the test-page value of the most recent .PARAGRAPH or .SET PARAGRAPH command you have entered. If you have not specified such a value, you get 7 plus the .PARAGRAPH default of 2. (See the description of n8 for note on .SPACING adjustment.) n9=2 Two spaces between the section number of the header and the header itself (section title). 3 .SUBPAGE The .SUBPAGE command begins a new page and a new format for page numbering. It numbers the new page by keeping the previous page number and appending the letter A to it. For example, if the previous page is 10, the first subpage is 10A and the next page becomes 10B unless you enter an .END SUBPAGE command. (See also .NUMBER SUBPAGE, .DISPLAY SUBPAGE, .HEADERS ON, .LAYOUT, and .PAGE.) The .END SUBPAGE command begins a new page and goes back to normal page numbering. If you enter the .END SUBPAGE command on page 2-8D, for example, the next page would be numbered 2-9. Formats .SUBPAGE .END SUBPAGE Abreviated formats .SPG .ES 4 Default .SUBPAGE is not in effect. 3 .SUBTITLE The .SUBTITLE command allows you to specify a subtitle for a running head (see .HEADERS ON). When using the default .LAYOUT command, the subtitle appears on the second line of every page (except page 1) at the leftmost position on a line (character position 0), regardless of the left margin setting. The .NO SUBTITLE command cancels the .SUBTITLE command. (See also .AUTOSUBTITLE, .TITLE, .FIRST TITLE, and .LAYOUT.) Formats .SUBTITLE [text] .NO SUBTITLE Abreviated formats .ST [text] .NST 4 Parameter text The title of the running head you want to appear on the second line of the page. 4 Defaults o If you do not enter either .SUBTITLE or .NO SUBTITLE, you get .NO SUBTITLE. o If you enter the .SUBTITLE command without specifying subtitle text for it, you will get the effects of .AUTOSUBTITLE (provided you have not entered .NO AUTOSUBTITLE). o If .AUTOSUBTITLE is in effect and if the text picked up from an applicable .HEADER LEVEL command is wider than the margins in effect when the subtitle is displayed, the subtitle is truncated and an ellipsis (...) is appended to the end of it. 3 .TAB_STOPS The .TAB STOPS command changes the current positions of tab stops. Each tab character in the input file advances the print carriage to the right to the next tab stop. Format .TAB STOPS [[+/-]n1] [,[+/-]n2]...[,[+/-]n32] Abreviated format .TS [[+/-]n1] [,[+/-]n2]...[,[+/-]n32] 4 Defaults o If you enter the .TAB STOPS command without number or comma specifications, the use of all tab stops is suspended and the tab character is equivalent to a space. o If you do not enter the .TAB STOPS command, successive tab characters work as if you had set a tab stop every eight positions; that is, as if you had entered .TAB STOPS 8,16,24, and so on. Note that because .PAGE SIZE has a width limit of 150, 149 is the practical limit for .TAB STOPS. 3 .TEST_PAGE The .TEST PAGE command allows you to keep a specified amount of text entirely on a single page. If there is not enough room on the current page to accommodate that amount, DSR ends the current page and puts the entire text on the next page. Format .TEST PAGE n Abreviated format .TP n 4 Parameter n The number of lines required to be on one page. This number cannot be omitted and must be positive. 3 .TITLE The .TITLE command allows you to specify a title for a running head (see .HEADERS ON). This title normally appears at the top of every page but the first, at the leftmost position on the line (character position 0), regardless of the .LEFT MARGIN setting. (See also .FIRST TITLE, .SUBTITLE, and .LAYOUT.) Format .TITLE [text] Abreviated format .T [text] 4 Parameter text The title of the main running head you want to appear. 4 Default If you do not enter the .TITLE command, you get the title you specified in any .CHAPTER command that is in effect (unless you have entered .NO HEADERS). 3 .VARIABLE The .VARIABLE command allows you to specify a character that corresponds to the name you have given the commands and text in an .IF (or .IFNOT) block. This identifying character is placed in the left margin when you process your file with the /DEBUG or /DEBUG=CONDITIONALS command line qualifier. Format .VARIABLE name [t ,f] Abreviated format .VR name [t ,f] 4 Parameters name The name you have given to the commands and text in an .IF (or .IFNOT) block. t (True) is a single character of your choice that appears in front of lines of text to indicate that they will be processed (.IF block) if you specify /VARIANT, instead of /DEBUG, in the command line. f (False) is a single character of your choice that appears in front of lines of text to indicate that they will not be processed (.IFNOT block) if you specify /VARIANT, instead of /DEBUG, in the command line. 3 .XLOWER The .XLOWER command allows you to control the case of index entries specified by the .INDEX and the .ENTRY commands, or by the Index flag (>). The case of the index entries will match exactly the case that you enter when you make the index entry. See also the .XUPPER command. Format .XLOWER Abreviated format .XL 4 Default If you do not specify the .XLOWER command, .XUPPER is the default. 3 .XUPPER The .XUPPER command lets DSR control the case of index entries. If .XUPPER is in effect (as it is by default), DSR capitalizes the first character of every index entry and drops everything else in the entry to lowercase. See also the .XLOWER command. Formats .XUPPER Abreviated formats .XU 4 Default .XUPPER 2 DSR_Flags DSR flags are special characters that you enter to specify emphasis of text, case of characters, spacing of text, and other formatting details. 3 Accept The Accept flag (_) causes any character that directly follows it to be accepted as text. If the character is a punctuation mark after which DSR normally inserts an extra space (for example, a period), you can precede it with the Accept flag to cancel the extra space. If you want to insert a flag character into your text, the easiest way is to precede it with the Accept flag. For example, to insert an ampersand (&), which is also the Underline flag, type _&. For underlining purposes, you can use the Accept flag to cause the acceptance of an expandable space (one you produce by pressing the SPACE bar) because DSR normally does not underline spaces between words. 4 Default Recognition is turned on. 3 Bold The single character occurrence of the Bold flag (*) causes the next character to be printed in boldface; that is, to be overstruck once. You can cause characters to be overstruck more than once by using the /BOLD=number qualifier when processing the file with the RUNOFF command. Pairing the bold flag with the uppercase flag (^*) turns on the bolding until the lowercase/bold pair (\*) is encountered. 4 Default Recognition is turned off. To turn on recognition, you must use the .FLAGS BOLD command. 3 Break The Break flag (|) tells DSR where it may break a word that occurs at the end of a line. You might want DSR to be able to break a word after a slash (/) or a hyphen (-) that is part of the word (for example, "a yes/no response"). The Break flag allows a line to end where the flag occurs; no hyphen is ever inserted because of it. If the flag is turned on and inserted at break points, DSR is able to break the word at any of the specified points. If more than one Break flag is present in a word that DSR is breaking at the end of a line, DSR leaves as much of the word as possible on the line; that is, it breaks the word at the last possible Break flag. The Break flag works the same whether .JUSTIFY or .NO JUSTIFY is in effect. 4 Default Recognition is turned off. To turn on recognition, you must use the .FLAGS BREAK command. 3 Capitalize The Capitalize flag (<) causes all the letters in the word directly following it to be capitalized, except for letters that may be preceded by an Accept (_) or Lowercase (\) flag. Capitalization continues until one of the following is encountered: An expandable space A Break flag (|) A Hyphenate flag (=) Another Capitalize flag A pair of Uppercase flags (^^) A pair of Lowercase flags (\\) The end of the line You can pair the Capitalize flag with the Uppercase flag (^<) to capitalize all following text up to the next case flag. 4 Default Recognition is turned off. To turn on recognition, you must use the .FLAGS CAPITALIZE command. 3 Comment The Comment flag (!) is used to insert comments in .RNO files. You type the comment text immediately after the Comment flag. Comments do not appear in the output file. 4 Default Recognition is turned on. 3 Control The Control flag (.) is placed at the left margin to begin a string of DSR commands. When you want a period to be accepted as a text character, you do not need to precede it with an Accept flag (_) as long as the period is not placed at the left margin. If you do need to have a period in the 0 character position (and it is not part of a DSR command), you must precede it with an Accept flag. Alternatively, you can use two periods at the beginning of a line; the effect is the same as if you had used an Accept flag. 4 Default Recognition is turned on. 3 Hyphenate When the Hyphenate flag (=) is turned on and inserted between syllables of a word, DSR knows where the word can be broken at the end of a line. DSR inserts a hyphen where the break occurs. If DSR does not find it necessary to break the word, however, the hyphen does not appear. By default, the Hyphenate flag is disabled. The action of this flag (as opposed to the recognition of the flag) can be disabled or reenabled by the .DISABLE HYPHENATION and .ENABLE HYPHENATION commands. 4 Default Recognition is turned off. To turn on recognition, you must use the .FLAGS HYPHENATE command. 3 Index With the Index flag (>), you can mark words in the text of your document as index entries. Using the .INDEX command instead of the Index flag is a more common way of marking index entries. 4 Default Recognition is turned off. To turn on recognition, you must use the .FLAGS INDEX command. 3 Lowercase The Lowercase flag (\) causes the letter that directly follows it to appear in lowercase. The flag has no effect if the character following it is not a letter. The Lowercase flag can be paired as follows: o With the Underline flag (\&) to stop underlining text. o With the Bold flag (\*) to stop bolding characters. o With itself (\\) to cause the characters following it to be printed in lowercase by default. If you have a file that is in all uppercase, you can put a paired lowercase flag (\\) at the beginning of the file and then, as needed, override the temporary lowercase default by using a circumflex (^) to capitalize the letter following it. 4 Default Recognition is turned on. 3 Overstrike When the Overstrike flag (%) is turned on and inserted between two characters, it causes the first of the two characters to be overstruck by the following one. By default, the Overstrike flag is disabled. This capability allows the printing of characters not normally available, for example, a European 7, which is a 7 overstruck with a hyphen. Three or more characters can be overstruck, but only if you specify the /BACKSPACE qualifier in the DSR command line. Otherwise, only the first and last characters in an overstrike sequence will appear. The action performed by this flag (as opposed to the flag's recognition) can be disabled and reenabled by the .DISABLE OVERSTRIKING and .ENABLE OVERSTRIKING commands. 4 Default Recognition is turned off. To turn on recognition, you must use the .FLAGS OVERSTRIKE command. 3 Period DSR routinely inserts an extra expandable space after a period (.), colon (:), question mark (?), or exclamation point (!) that is followed by the usual end-of-word space. The Period flag (+) lets you specify the extra space following other characters. If the flag is turned on and .FILL is in effect, an extra space occurs when the flag (+) is inserted directly after the character. You must, however, insert the end-of-word space after the flag if it is to be effective. For example, if you have a complete sentence enclosed in quotation marks or parentheses, you may want an extra space after the closing quotation mark or parenthesis. 4 Default Recognition is turned off. To turn on recognition, you must use the .FLAGS PERIOD command. 3 Space The Space flag (#) produces one unexpandable space (not affected by justification) in the output file for every flag character inserted in the input file. If you insert the flag between two words, DSR treats them as one word (although they will appear as separate words in the output file). Therefore, you should not type any spaces before or after typing the Space flag. The flag can directly follow an Underline flag (&#) to cause the underlining of an unexpandable space. 4 Default Recognition is turned on. 3 Subindex The Subindex flag (>) works as a subindex entry flag only if you have issued an .INDEX or .ENTRY command. Subindex entries marked with this flag are collected and alphabetized below the primary entry to which they refer. The Subindex flag indicates that the next word or phrase will be placed on the following line of the index, indented two characters to the right of the preceding entry. 4 Default Recognition is turned on only within .INDEX and .ENTRY commands. 3 Substitute The Subsitute flag ($$) is the only flag that must be used in pairs. When the flag is turned on, it causes either a date or a time to be output. The output is determined by the word you associate with the flag pair; for example, $$Date. See the output in the following example. When the Substitute flag is turned on, any dollar sign character ($), even if it is not paired, must be preceded by an Accept flag if it is to be taken as normal text by DSR. 4 Default Recognition is turned off. To turn on recognition, you must use the .FLAGS SUBSTITUTE command. 4 Examples The following table shows the use of the substitute flag. The output file will contain the date and time that DSR processing of the file began. Input Output .FLAGS SUBSTITUTE $$Date 10 November 1993 $$Time 10:55:00 $$Year 1993 $$Month November $$Day 10 $$Hours 10 $$Minutes 55 $$Seconds 00 $$Month#$$Day,#$$Year November 10, 1993 3 Underline The Underline flag (&) causes the next character to be underlined. The operation performed by this flag (as opposed to the flag's recognition) can be disabled and reenabled by the .DISABLE UNDERLINING and .ENABLE UNDERLINING commands. The Underline flag can be paired as follows: o With the Uppercase flag (^&) to turn underlining on and with the Lowercase flag (\&) to turn underlining off. o With the Space flag (&#) to cause the underlining of unexpandable spaces. 4 Default Recognition is turned on. 3 Uppercase The Uppercase flag (^) serves the same purpose as a typewriter Shift key when you use it just before typing a letter. The flag capitalizes any single letter that directly follows it. It has no effect if the character following it is not a letter. The Uppercase flag can be paired as follows: o With a Capitalize flag (^<) to turn on the capitalization of the text that follows (the same as using Shift-Lock on a typewriter). o With an Underline flag (^&) to turn on underlining of the text that follows. o With a Bold flag (^*) to turn on bolding for the text that follows. o With itself (^^) if you want to ensure that the case of letters in your input file is maintained in your output file. You can use this flag pair with those commands that control uppercasing and lowercasing (such as .HEADER LEVEL or .CHAPTER). When you specify a title, precede it with two circumflexes (^^). 4 Default Recognition is turned on.

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