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1 EDIT

The EDIT commands perform the following functions: o Invoke the Access Control List Editor to create or modify an access control list for an object (see /ACL). o Invoke the EDT screen-oriented editor (see /EDT). o Invoke the FDL editor to create and modify File Definition Language files (see /FDL). o Invoke the SUMSLP batch-oriented editor to update a single input file with multiple files of edit commands (see /SUM). o Invoke the TECO editor (see /TECO). o Invoke the TPU editor (see /TPU). 2 /ACL The access control list editor (ACL editor) creates or modifies an access control list (ACL) for a specified object. Format EDIT/ACL object-spec 3 Parameter object-spec Specifies the object whose access control list is to be created or edited. If an access control list does not exist, it is created. You can specify an object from any of the following object classes: Capability Common event flag cluster Device File Group global section Logical name table Queue Resource domain Security class System global section Volume The default object class is a file. A file must be a disk file on a Files-11 On-Disk Structure Level 2 formatted volume. For any object other than a file, you must specify the object class with the /CLASS qualifier. Note that the ACL editor does not provide a default file type for files. To prevent the ACL editor from using a null file type, specify the file type on the command line. If the object is a directory, specify the .DIR file type. Do not include wildcard characters in the object specification. 4 Qualifiers Qualifier Description /CLASS Specifies the class of object whose ACL is being edited /JOURNAL Controls whether a journal file is created for the editing session /MODE Specifies the use of prompting during the editing session /OBJECT_TYPE Superseded by the /CLASS qualifier /RECOVER Restores an ACL from a journal file at the beginning of an editing session 3 /CLASS Specifies the class of the object whose ACL is being edited. Unless the object is a file, you must specify the object class. Format /CLASS =object-class 4 Description To edit the ACL for an object other than a file, specify the object class with the /CLASS qualifier. Specify one of the following classes: CAPABILITY A system capability, such as the ability to process vector instructions. Currently, the only defined object name for the CAPABILITY class is VECTOR, which governs the ability of a subject to access a vector processor on the system. Note that you must supply the capability name as the object name parameter. COMMON_EVENT_ A common event flag cluster. CLUSTER DEVICE A device, such as a disk or tape drive. FILE A file or a directory file. This is the default. GROUP_GLOBAL_ A group global section. SECTION LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE A logical name table. QUEUE A batch queue or a device (printer, server, or terminal) queue. RESOURCE_DOMAIN A resource domain. SECURITY_CLASS A security class. SYSTEM_GLOBAL_ A system global section. SECTION VOLUME A disk or tape volume. 4 Examples 1.$ EDIT/ACL/CLASS=DEVICE WORK1 The command in this example specifies that the object WORK1 is a device. 2.$ EDIT/ACL/CLASS=QUEUE FAST_BATCH The command in this example creates an ACL for the queue FAST_ BATCH. Note that if you create an ACL for a generic queue, you must create identical ACLs for all execution queues to which jobs can be directed. 3 /JOURNAL Controls whether a journal file is created for the editing session. Format /JOURNAL [=file-spec] /NOJOURNAL 4 Description By default, the ACL editor keeps a journal file containing a copy of modifications made during an editing session. The journal file is given the name of the object and a .TJL file type. If you specify a different name for the file, do not include any wildcard characters. To prevent the ACL editor from creating a journal file, specify /NOJOURNAL. If your editing session ends abnormally, you can recover the changes made during the aborted session by invoking the ACL editor with the /RECOVER qualifier. 4 Example $ EDIT/ACL/JOURNAL=COMMONACL.SAV MECH1117.DAT With this command, you create a journal file named COMMONACL.SAV. The file contains a copy of the ACL and the editing commands used to create the ACL for the file MECH1117.DAT. If the editing session is interrupted, you can recover your edits by specifying the name COMMONACL.SAV with the /RECOVER qualifier. $ EDIT/ACL/CLASS=RESOURCE/JOURNAL=ZERO_RESOURCE.TJL [0] If you edit an ACL for the resource domain [0], the ACL editor attempts to create the file [0].TJL on the default device and fails. To create an ACL for the resource [0], you must specify a different name for the journal file (as shown in this example) or suppress the creation of a journal file with the /NOJOURNAL qualifier. 3 /MODE Specifies the use of prompting during the editing session. Format /MODE =option 4 Description By default, the ACL editor prompts you for each ACE and provides values for some of the fields within an ACE (/MODE=PROMPT). To disable prompting, specify /MODE=NOPROMPT on the command line. 4 Example $ EDIT/ACL/MODE=NOPROMPT WEATHERTBL.DAT With this command, you initiate an ACL editing session to create an ACL for the file WEATHERTBL.DAT. The /MODE=NOPROMPT qualifier specifies that no assistance is required in entering the ACL entries. 3 /OBJECT_TYPE The /OBJECT_TYPE qualifier is superseded by the /CLASS qualifier. 3 /RECOVER Restores an ACL from a journal file at the beginning of an editing session. Format /RECOVER [=file-spec] /NORECOVER 4 Description The /RECOVER qualifier specifies that the ACL editor must restore the ACL from a journal file. The ACL editor restores the ACL to the state it was in when the last ACL editing session ended abnormally. By default the journal file is given the name of the object and a .TJL file type. If you specify a more meaningful name for the journal file when you invoke the ACL editor (by using /JOURNAL), specify that file name with the /RECOVER qualifier. 4 Example $ EDIT/ACL/JOURNAL=SAVEACL MYFILE.DAT . . . User creates ACL until system crashes . . . $ EDIT/ACL/JOURNAL=SAVEACL/RECOVER=SAVEACL MYFILE.DAT . . . ACL is restored and user proceeds with editing until done . . . ^Z $ The first command in this example starts the ACL editing session and specifies that the ACL editor must save the journal file SAVEACL.TJL if the session ends abnormally. The session proceeds until it is aborted by a system crash. The next command restores the lost session with the journal file SAVEACL.TJL. To end the session, press Ctrl/Z. The ACL editor saves the edits and deletes the journal file. 2 /EDT Invokes the Digital Standard Editor (EDT) interactive text editor. Format EDIT/EDT [file-name] 3 Parameter file-name Specifies the file to be created or edited using EDT. If the file does not exist, it is created by EDT. EDT does not provide a default file type when creating files; if you do not include a file type, it is null. The file must be a disk file on a Files-11 formatted volume. No wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. 3 Qualifiers /COMMAND /COMMAND[=file-name] /NOCOMMAND Determines whether or not EDT uses a startup command file. The /COMMAND file qualifier should be followed by an equal sign (=) and the specification of the command file. The default file type for command files is EDT. No wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. The following command line invokes EDT to edit a file named MEMO.DAT and specifies that EDT use a startup command file named XEDTINI.EDT: $ EDIT/COMMAND=XEDTINI.EDT MEMO.DAT If you do not include the /COMMAND=command file qualifier, EDT looks for the EDTSYS logical name assignment. If EDTSYS is not defined, EDT processes the systemwide startup command file SYS$LIBRARY:EDTSYS.EDT. If this file does not exist, EDT looks for the EDTINI logical name assignment. If EDTINI is not defined, EDT looks for the file named EDTINI.EDT in your default directory. If none of these files exists, EDT begins your editing session in the default state. To prevent EDT from processing either the systemwide startup command file or the EDTINI.EDT file in your default directory, use the /NOCOMMAND qualifier as follows: $ EDIT/NOCOMMAND MEMO.DAT /CREATE /CREATE (default) /NOCREATE Controls whether EDT creates a new file when the specified input file is not found. Normally, EDT creates a new file to match the input file specification if it cannot find the requested file name in the specified directory. When you use the /NOCREATE qualifier in the EDT command line and type a specification for a file that does not exist, EDT displays an error message and returns to the DCL command level as follows: $ EDIT/NOCREATE NEWFILE.DAT Input file does not exist $ /JOURNAL /JOURNAL[=journal-file] /NOJOURNAL Determines whether EDT keeps a journal during your editing session. A journal contains a record of the keystrokes you enter during an editing session. The default file name for the journal is the same as the input file name. The default file type is JOU. The /JOURNAL qualifier enables you to use a different file specification for the journal. The following command line invokes EDT to edit a file named MEMO.DAT and specifies the name SAVE.JOU for the journal: $ EDIT/JOURNAL=SAVE MEMO.DAT If you are editing a file from another directory and want the journal to be located in that directory, you must use the /JOURNAL qualifier with a file specification that includes the directory name. Otherwise, EDT creates the journal in the default directory. The directory that is to contain the journal should not be write- protected. To prevent EDT from keeping a record of your editing session, use the /NOJOURNAL qualifier in the EDT command line as follows: $ EDIT/NOJOURNAL MEMO.DAT Once you have created a journal, enter the EDT/RECOVER command to execute the commands in the journal. No wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. /OUTPUT /OUTPUT=output-file /NOOUTPUT Determines whether EDT creates an output file at the end of your editing session. The default file specification for both the input file and the output file is the same. Use the /OUTPUT qualifier to give the output file a different file specification from the input file. The following command line invokes EDT to edit a file named MEMO.DAT and gives the resulting output file the name OUTMEM.DAT: $ EDIT/OUTPUT=OUTMEM.DAT MEMO.DAT You can include directory information as part of your output file specification to send output to another directory as follows: $ EDIT/OUTPUT=[BARRETT.MAIL]MEMO.DAT MEMO.DAT The /NOOUTPUT qualifier suppresses the creation of an output file, but not the creation of a journal. If you decide that you do not want an output file, you can use the /NOOUTPUT qualifier as follows: $ EDIT/NOOUTPUT MEMO.DAT A system interruption does not prevent you from re-creating your editing session because a journal is still being maintained. To save your editing session, even when you specify /NOOUTPUT, use the line mode command WRITE to put the text in an external file before you end the session. No wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. /READ_ONLY /READ_ONLY /NOREAD_ONLY (default) Determines whether EDT keeps a journal and creates an output file. With the /NOREAD_ONLY qualifier, EDT maintains the journal and creates an output file when it processes the line mode command EXIT. Using the /READ_ONLY qualifier has the same effect as specifying both the /NOJOURNAL and /NOOUTPUT qualifiers. The following command line invokes EDT to edit a file named CALENDAR.DAT, but does not create a journal or an output file: $ EDIT/READ_ONLY CALENDAR.DAT Use the /READ_ONLY qualifier when you are searching a file and do not intend to make any changes to it. To modify the file, use the line mode command WRITE to save your changes. Remember, however, that you have no journal. /RECOVER /RECOVER /NORECOVER (default) Determines whether EDT reads a journal at the start of the editing session. When you use the /RECOVER qualifier, EDT reads the appropriate journal and processes whatever commands it contains. The appropriate syntax is as follows: $ EDIT/RECOVER MEMO.DAT If the journal file type is not JOU or the file name is not the same as the input file name, you must include both the /JOURNAL qualifier and the /RECOVER qualifier as follows: $ EDIT/RECOVER/JOURNAL=SAVE.XXX MEMO.DAT Because the /NORECOVER qualifier is the default for EDT, you do not need to specify it in a command line. 3 Examples 1.$ EDIT/OUTPUT=NEWFILE.TXT OLDFILE.TXT 1 This is the first line of the file OLDFILE.TXT. * This EDIT command invokes EDT to edit the file OLDFILE.TXT. EDT looks for the EDTSYS logical name assignment. If EDTSYS is not defined, EDT processes the systemwide startup command file SYS$LIBRARY:EDTSYS.EDT. If this file does not exist, EDT looks for the EDTINI logical name assignment. If EDTINI is not defined, EDT looks for the file named EDTINI.EDT in your default directory. If none of these files exists, EDT begins your editing session in the default state. When the session ends, the edited file has the name NEWFILE.TXT. 2.$ EDIT/RECOVER OLDFILE.TXT This EDIT command invokes EDT to recover from an abnormal exit during a previous editing session. EDT opens the file OLDFILE.TXT, and then processes the journal OLDFILE.JOU. Once the journal has been processed, the user can resume interactive editing. 2 /FDL Invokes the Edit/FDL utility (EDIT/FDL) to create and modify File Definition Language (FDL) files. The /FDL qualifier is required. For a complete description of the Edit/FDL utility, including more information about the EDIT/FDL command and its qualifiers, see the OpenVMS Record Management Utilities Reference Manual. Format EDIT/FDL file-name 3 Parameter fdl-file-name Use this parameter to specify the FDL file to be created, modified, or optimized during this session. If you specify an existing FDL file for modification or for optimization, the output file is the next higher version of the file being modified or optimized. In all cases, you have the option of using the /OUTPUT qualifier to specify the output FDL file. The default file type is .FDL. 3 Qualifiers /ANALYSIS /ANALYSIS=fdl-file-name This qualifier specifies an FDL file obtained from a file analysis. Example $ EDIT/FDL/ANALYSIS=Q1_SALES Q2_SALES This command begins an interactive session in which the analysis information in the file Q1_SALES.FDL is used, together with the input FDL file Q2_SALES.FDL, to obtain an optimized output file, which the system designates as the next higher version of Q2_ SALES.FDL. /CREATE This qualifier allows you to create an output file without an existing input file. Using the /CREATE qualifier, you can create an output file directly without the Edit/FDL utility notifying you that the file is to be created. Example $ EDIT/FDL/CREATE SALES_DATA This command begins a session in which SALES_DATA.FDL is created. The Edit/FDL utility does not issue the informational message stating that the new file SALES_DATA.FDL will be created. /DISPLAY /DISPLAY=graph-option This qualifier specifies the type of graph you want displayed. LINE Plots bucket size against index depth. FILL Plots bucket size by the percentage of load fill by index depth. KEY Plots bucket size by key length by index depth. RECORD Plots bucket size by record size by index depth. INIT Plots bucket size by initial load record count by index depth. ADD Plots bucket size by additional record count by index depth. The default is LINE. Example $ EDIT/FDL/DISPLAY=KEY TEMP_DATA This command begins an interactive session in which the default value for the type of graph to be displayed has been changed from LINE to KEY. TEMP_DATA is the name of the FDL file to be created. /EMPHASIS /EMPHASIS=tuning-bias This qualifier provides you with a choice between smaller buffers and flatter files. You can use /EMPHASIS with the /NOINTERACTIVE qualifier if you want EDIT/FDL to be executed without an interactive terminal dialogue. FLATTER_FILES Generally increases bucket size. The bucket size, in turn, controls the number of levels in the index structure. If a larger bucket size eliminates one level, then you should use this option. At some point, however, the benefit of having fewer levels will be offset by the cost of scanning through the larger buckets. SMALLER_BUFFERS Generally decreases the amount of memory you have to use. Example $ EDIT/FDL/EMPHASIS=SMALLER_BUFFERS TEMP_DATA This command begins an interactive session in which the default value for the bucket size emphasis has been changed from FLATTER_ FILES to SMALLER_BUFFERS. TEMP_DATA is the name of the FDL file to be created. /GRANULARITY /GRANULARITY=n This qualifier specifies the number of key-associated areas in an indexed file. A file can contain from 1 to 255 key-associated areas and each area can contain one or more index levels from one or more keys. Each key definition contains the following area designations: o DATA_AREA o LEVEL1_INDEX_AREA o INDEX_AREA During input processing, the optimization and redesign functions assign two areas per key, one for data and one for both indexes. During output processing, the area designators are adjusted according to the granularity specified. Checks are made to exclude areas that have no key indexes and to create new key indexed areas where none previously existed. To assign more than two areas per key (DOUBLE) or to assign nonstandard key and area associations, you must invoke an interactive session. With the granularity qualifier configured as GRANULARITY=DOUBLE, create new areas and set the corresponding area designators to reference the new areas on a per-key basis. Example $ EDIT/FDL/GRANULARITY=2 TEMP_DATA.FDL This command begins an interactive session in which the output granularity will be two (2). TEMP_DATA.FDL is the name of the FDL file being processed. /NOINTERACTIVE This qualifier causes the Edit/FDL utility to execute the Optimize script without a terminal dialogue. The /NOINTERACTIVE qualifier allows you to optimize an existing FDL file with the Edit/FDL utility but without an interactive terminal dialogue. You must have previously entered the ANALYZE /RMS_FILE/FDL command, specifying your existing RMS data file as the target file. The Edit/FDL utility then uses the data from the analysis FDL file while the Optimize script proceeds noninteractively. If data is missing, the Edit/FDL utility uses the defaults. However, if critical data items are not found in the analysis file, the Edit/FDL utility exits without producing an output file. Example $ EDIT/FDL/ANALYSIS=TEMP_DATA/NOINTERACTIVE TEMP_DATA This command begins a noninteractive session in which the FDL file TEMP_DATA;2 is created from the analysis FDL file TEMP.DATA;1. /NUMBER_KEYS /NUMBER_KEYS=n This qualifier allows you to specify the number of keys in your indexed file. Example $ EDIT/FDL/NUMBER_KEYS=3 TEMP_DATA This command begins an interactive session in which the default value for the number of keys in an indexed file is changed from 1 key to 3 keys. TEMP_DATA is the name of the FDL file to be created. /OUTPUT /OUTPUT=file-spec This qualifier specifies the FDL file in which to place the definition from the current session. If you omit the /OUTPUT qualifier, the output FDL file will have the same name and file type as the input file, with a version number that is one higher than the highest existing version of the file. The default file type is .FDL. Example $ EDIT/FDL/OUTPUT=NEWINDEX INDEX Begins a session in which the contents of INDEX.FDL are read into the FDL editor and can then be modified. NEWINDEX.FDL is created; INDEX.FDL is not changed. /PROMPTING /PROMPTING=prompt-option Specifies the level of prompting to be used during the terminal session. By default, the Edit/FDL utility chooses either BRIEF or FULL, depending on the terminal type and the line speed. High-speed CRT terminals are set to FULL; nonscope terminals and terminals operating at less than 2400 baud are set to BRIEF. Example $ EDIT/FDL/PROMPTING=BRIEF TEMP_DATA This command begins an interactive session in which the value of the prompting level for the the Edit/FDL utility menus is set to BRIEF. /RESPONSES /RESPONSES=response-option This qualifier allows you to select how you want to respond to script questions. AUTOMATIC Indicates that you want all script default responses to be used automatically. This option speeds the progress of the question and answer session. Once you have entered the design phase, you can modify most of the answers you took by default. MANUAL Indicates that you want to provide all script responses. Example $ EDIT/FDL/RESPONSES=MANUAL TEMP_DATA This command begins an interactive session in which the type of script response is MANUAL. /SCRIPT /SCRIPT=script-title This qualifier controls whether the Edit/FDL utility begins the session by asking a logically grouped sequence of questions to aid you in creating the FDL file. ADD_KEY Allows you to model or add to the attributes of a new index. DELETE_KEY Allows you to remove attributes from the highest index of your file. INDEXED Begins a dialogue in which you are prompted for information about the indexed data file to be created from the FDL file. the Edit/FDL utility supplies values for certain attributes. OPTIMIZE Requires that you use the analysis information from an FDL file that was created with the Analyze/RMS_ File utility (ANALYZE/RMS_FILE). The FDL file itself is one of the inputs to the Edit/FDL utility (EDIT /FDL). In other words, you can tune the parameters of all your indexes using the file statistics gathered from a file analysis. RELATIVE Begins a dialogue in which you are prompted for information about the relative data file to be created from the FDL file. the Edit/FDL utility supplies values for certain attributes. SEQUENTIAL Begins a dialogue in which you are prompted for information about the sequential data file to be created from the FDL file. the Edit/FDL utility supplies values for certain attributes. TOUCHUP Begins a dialogue in which you are prompted for information about the changes you want to make to an existing index. Example $ EDIT/FDL/SCRIPT=INDEXED TEMP_DATA This command begins an interactive session in which both the main menu and the script menu are bypassed. Instead, the Indexed script is generated immediately. 2 /SUM Invokes the SUMSLP batch-oriented editor to update source files. You enter text changes and editing commands in update files. SUMSLP merges the update files containing the changes with the source file that you specify, and gives you a record of the changes in the form of an audit trail. For more information, see the VMS SUMSLP Utility Manual. Format: EDIT/SUM file-spec 3 Parameter file-spec Specifies the source file to be edited. 3 Qualifiers /LISTING /LISTING[=file-spec] Determines whether a sequence-numbered listing file, showing the original and inserted lines and an audit trail, is produced during the editing process. If you do not include a file specification, the listing file takes the same name as the input file, with a file type of LIS. By default, no listing file is produced. /OUTPUT /OUTPUT[=file-spec] Specifies the output file to be used in the editing session. If you do not include a file specification, the output file has the same name and type as the input file, with a version number one higher than the highest existing version. /HEADER /HEADER/OUTPUT=file-spec Determines whether the output file is created as a VFC format sequential file with the line insert number and audit trail information in the record header block (RHB) for the records. /UPDATE /UPDATE[=(update-file-spec[,...])] Indicates the file or files containing the editing commands and changes to be applied to the input source file. The default file type of these files is UPD. 3 Example EDIT/SUM FILE1.MAR/UPDATE=(UPD1A,UPD1B.ENH) The input source file FILE1.MAR is updated with the merged contents of SUMSLP update files UPD1A.UPD and UPD1B.ENH. 2 /TECO Invokes the TECO interactive text editor. The /TECO qualifier is required. Format EDIT/TECO [file-name] EDIT/TECO/EXECUTE=command-file [argument] 3 Parameter file-name Specifies the file to be created or edited using the TECO editor. If the file does not exist, it is created by TECO, unless you specify the /NOCREATE qualifier. No wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. If you specify the /MEMORY qualifier (default) without a file specification, TECO edits the file identified by the logical name TEC$MEMORY. If TEC$MEMORY has no equivalence string, or if the /NOMEMORY qualifier is specified, TECO starts in command mode and does not edit an existing file. If you specify the /MEMORY qualifier and a file specification, the file specification is equated to the logical name TEC$MEMORY. 3 Qualifiers /COMMAND /COMMAND[=file-name] /NOCOMMAND Controls whether a startup command file is used. The /COMMAND file qualifier may be followed by an equal sign (=) and the specification of the command file. The default file type for command files is TEC. The following command line invokes TECO to edit a file named MEMO.DAT and specifies that TECO use a startup command file named XTECOINI.TEC: $ EDIT/TECO/COMMAND=XTECOINI.TEC MEMO.DAT If you do not include the /COMMAND qualifier, or if you enter /COMMAND without specifying a command file, TECO looks for the TEC$INIT logical name assignment. If TEC$INIT is not defined, no startup commands are executed. The logical name TEC$INIT can equate either to a string of TECO commands or to a dollar sign followed by a file specification. If TEC$INIT translates to a string of TECO commands, the string is executed; if it translates to a dollar sign ($) followed by a file specification, the contents of the file are executed as a TECO command string. For further information, see the PDP-11 TECO Editor Reference Manual. To prevent TECO from using any startup command file, use the /NOCOMMAND qualifier as follows: $ EDIT/TECO/NOCOMMAND MEMO.DAT No wildcards are allowed in the file specification. /CREATE /CREATE (default) /NOCREATE Creates a new file when the specified input file cannot be found. If the /MEMORY qualifier is specified and no input file is specified, the file created is the one specified by the logical name TEC$MEMORY. Normally, TECO creates a new file to match the input file specification if it cannot find the requested file name in the specified directory. When you use the /NOCREATE qualifier in the TECO command line and type a specification for a file that does not exist, TECO displays an error message and returns you to the DCL command level. The /CREATE and /NOCREATE qualifiers are incompatible with the /EXECUTE qualifier. /EXECUTE /EXECUTE=command-file [argument] Invokes TECO and executes the TECO macro found in the command file. The argument, if specified, appears in the text buffer when macro execution starts. Blanks or special characters must be enclosed in quotation marks (" "). For detailed information on the use of TECO macros, see the PDP-11 TECO Editor Reference Manual. The /EXECUTE qualifier is incompatible with the /CREATE and /MEMORY qualifiers. /MEMORY /MEMORY (default) /NOMEMORY Specifies that the last file you edited with TECO, identified by the logical name TEC$MEMORY, will be the file edited if you omit the file specification to the EDIT/TECO command. /OUTPUT /OUTPUT=output-file /NOOUTPUT (default) Controls how the output file is named at the end of your editing session. By default, the output file has the same name as the input file but is given the next higher available version number. Use the /OUTPUT qualifier to give the output file a file specification different from the input file. The following command line invokes TECO to edit a file named MEMO.DAT and gives the resulting output file the name OUTMEM.DAT: $ EDIT/TECO/OUTPUT=OUTMEM.DAT MEMO.DAT You can include directory information as part of your output file specification to send output to another directory as follows: $ EDIT/TECO/OUTPUT=[BARRET.MAIL]MEMO.DAT MEMO.DAT No wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. /READ_ONLY /READ_ONLY /NOREAD_ONLY (default) Controls whether an output file is created. By default, an output file is created; the /READ_ONLY qualifier suppresses the creation of the output file. 3 Examples 1. $ EDIT/TECO/OUTPUT=NEWFILE.TXT OLDFILE.TXT This EDIT command invokes the TECO editor to edit the file OLDFILE.TXT. TECO looks for the TEC$INIT logical name assignment. If TEC$INIT is not defined, TECO begins the editing session without using a command file. When the session ends, the edited file has the name NEWFILE.TXT. 2. $ EDIT/TECO/EXECUTE=FIND_DUPS "TEMP, ARGS, BLANK" In this example, the /EXECUTE qualifier causes the TECO macro contained in the file FIND_DUPS.TEC to be executed, with the argument string "TEMP, ARGS, BLANK" located in the text buffer. 2 /TPU Invokes the DEC Text Processing Utility (DECTPU). By default, this runs an editor called EVE (for Extensible Versatile Editor). Format: EDIT/TPU[/qualifier...] [input-file,...] For example, the following command invokes DECTPU (running EVE) to create or edit a file named JABBER.TXT in your current, default directory: $ EDIT/TPU jabber.txt For information about DECTPU programming, see the DEC Text Processing Utility Reference Manual. For information about EVE, see the Extensible Versatile Editor Reference Manual or use the online help in EVE. 3 EVE_Editor The Extensible Versatile Editor (EVE) is a general-purpose text editor created with DECTPU---in effect, the default DECTPU application. You can use EVE on DECwindows or character-cell terminals (VT400, VT300, VT200, or VT100 series). EVE reads and writes standard ASCII text files. Using EVE, you can do the following: o Perform basic text editing and formatting operations o Create or edit one or more files in an editing session o Use multiple buffers and windows, and resize the windows o Set EDT or WPS keypad, define keys, and create learn sequences o Select boxes or linear ranges for cut-and-paste or other edits o Use either OpenVMS- or ULTRIX-style wildcards to search text o Execute DCL commands, such as DIRECTORY, from within the editor o Run DECspell to check selected text or an entire buffer o Spawn subprocesses or attach to other processes o Compile and execute DECTPU procedures to extend EVE o Add or delete menu items for the DECwindows interface o Save your customizations for future sessions o Use initialization files at startup or during an editing session o Recover your work in case of a system failure during a session o Get online help on commands, keys, menu items, and other topics To invoke EVE, use the EDIT/TPU command. By default, this runs the standard EVE section file---EVE$SECTION.TPU$SECTION (see help on /SECTION). You may want to create a symbol for invoking EVE, by putting the following line in your LOGIN.COM file: $ eve :== EDIT/TPU ! My symbol to invoke EVE If you specify an input file on the EDIT/TPU command line, EVE creates a buffer using the file name and file type for the buffer name, copies the file into that buffer, and displays it in the main window. If the file does not exist---for example, if you are creating a new file---the buffer is empty. If you do not specify an input file, EVE creates an empty buffer named MAIN. See help on Parameters. By default, EVE tries to execute an initialization file named EVE$INIT.EVE in your current directory or in SYS$LOGIN (your top- level, login directory). See help on /INITIALIZATION. Also, by default, EVE creates a buffer-change journal file for each buffer you create, so that if a system failure occurs during your editing session, you can recover your text. See help on /JOURNAL and /RECOVER. To enter EVE commands, press DO or PF4, type a command, and press RETURN. For a keypad diagram and help on defined keys, press HELP (on VT100-series terminals, press PF2). To exit from EVE, press F10 or CTRL/Z. For more information, see the Extensible Versatile Editor Reference Manual or use the online help in EVE, which provides informational topics on various features in addition to help on EVE commands and keys. In particular, you may want to read the following informational topics: New Features New User EDT Conversion EDT Differences WPS Differences For information about using EVE on DECwindows, use the online help in EVE and read the topic called DECwindows Differences. DECTPU and EVE run on both OpenVMS and ULTRIX operating systems. Thus, you can use the same editor on both systems, allowing for differences in the way files and directories are specified. 3 Examples 1. $ EDIT/TPU Invokes DECTPU. By default, this runs EVE, creating an empty buffer named MAIN. You can then simply start typing and editing, or you can specify the file you want to edit by using the GET FILE, OPEN, or OPEN SELECTED command. 2. $ EDIT/TPU /INTERFACE=DECWINDOWS Invokes DECTPU, running EVE, with the DECwindows Motif interface. For more information, see help on /DISPLAY or /INTERFACE. 3. $ EDIT/TPU jabber.txt Edits a file named JABBER.TXT in your current, default directory. If the file exists, EVE displays the text in the main window; if you are creating a new file, the main window and buffer empty. 4. $ EDIT/TPU *.txt EVE lets you use logical names and wildcards (such as *) to specify the input file. If more than one file matches your request, EVE shows a list of the matching files to choose from--- in this case, a list of files with the type .TXT. If no file matches, EVE creates an empty buffer named MAIN. 5. $ EDIT/TPU jabber.txt,*.mail,*.lis,memo.txt Edits files named JABBER.TXT and MEMO.TXT, and displays a list of files matching *.MAIL. If more than one file matches *.LIS, EVE issues a warning message that only one ambiguous file name is allowed on the EDIT/TPU command line. If only a single file matches *.LIS, EVE opens that file. If only a single file matches *.MAIL, EVE opens that file and displays the list of any files matching *.LIS. EVE displays the first file in the main window. If JABBER.TXT exists, EVE displays the text in the main window; if you are creating a new file, the main window is empty. 6. $ EDIT/TPU memo.txt /RECOVER Recovers the text of MEMO.TXT by using a buffer-change journal file named MEMO_TXT.TPU$JOURNAL. See help on /RECOVER. 7. $ DEFINE TPU$SECTION sys$login:mysection $ EDIT/TPU Defines the DECTPU default section file as MYSECTION.TPU$SECTION in your top-level, login directory and then invokes DECTPU using that section file instead of the standard EVE section file. See help on /SECTION. 3 Logical_Names You can define the following logical names for DECTPU and EVE startup files and other features instead of having to use command-line qualifiers: Logical names Definitions and usage --------------------------------------------------------------------- EVE$INIT EVE initialization file, typically to set margins, tab stops, and other attributes, or to define keys. See help on /INITIALIZATION. EVE$KEYPAD EVE keypad. This logical lets you choose between the various keypads. Valid equivalence names are EDT, EVE, NUMERIC, VT100, and WPS. If the logical name is not defined, the keypad defaults to EVE which gives the VT100 keypad on VT100 terminals or the NUMERIC keypad on VT200 and later terminals. This logical name overrides any keypad setting saved in a section file. Users can override the effect of this logical name by setting the keypad in their initialization file or command file. This logical name has no equivalent qualifier. If you extend EVE with your own keypad, you can also define the logical name to be the name of your keypad. For example, assume you have created a keypad named SIMPLE, and have a procedure named EVE_SET_KEYPAD_SIMPLE that sets the keypad. If you define the logical name to be SIMPLE, EVE will invoke your keypad during startup. TPU$CHARACTER_SET Character set to use to display characters having the 8th bit set. This affects how DECTPU converts text to lowercase or uppercase, and how it removes diacritical marks from text. See help on /CHARACTER_SET. TPU$COMMAND DECTPU command file to extend EVE, set up a special text-processing environment for batch editing, or create your own application. See help on /COMMAND. TPU$DEBUG DECTPU debug file to be compiled and executed when you use /DEBUG. Defining TPU$DEBUG does not automatically run the debug file when you invoke DECTPU. TPU$DISPLAY_MANAGER Screen display or interface. See help on /DISPLAY or /INTERFACE. TPU$JOURNAL Directory for buffer-change journal files. Does not apply to keystroke journal files. Default is SYS$SCRATCH. See help on /JOURNAL. TPU$SECTION Section file---either a customized version of EVE or an application you created. Default is EVE$SECTION.TPU$SECTION, the standard EVE section file. See help on /SECTION. TPU$WORK Work file which DECTPU uses to swap memory for editing very large files. See help on /WORK. Defining TPU$COMMAND or EVE$INIT makes startup faster than having the editor search for the respective default file. For example, if there is an EVE initialization file you want to use for all or most editing sessions, you should define EVE$INIT to specify that file, rather than have EVE search for the EVE$INIT.EVE file. You can put the definitions in your LOGIN.COM file. To override a definition, use the relevant command-line qualifier. For example, if you defined TPU$COMMAND but want to use a different command file for a particular editing session, use /COMMAND= and specify the command file; or if you do not want a command file used for a particular editing session, use /NOCOMMAND. 3 Parameters [input-file,...] The names of one or more text files you want to edit or create. The files must be disk files on a Files-11 formatted volume. There is no default file type---if you do not specify a file type, the file type is null. Processing the input file depends on the DECTPU application you are using. EVE handles the input file as follows: o EVE uses the input file name and file type for the buffer name. If the input file exists, EVE copies it into the buffer and displays the text in the main window. A message tells you the number of lines in the file. For example, the following command edits a file named JABBER.TXT: $ EDIT/TPU jabber.txt 24 lines read from DISK$1:[USER]JABBER.TXT;4 If the file does not exist---if you are creating a new file---the buffer is empty. o If you do not specify an input file, EVE creates an empty buffer named MAIN. You can then simply start typing and editing, or you can specify the file you want to edit or create by using the GET FILE, OPEN, or OPEN SELECTED command. o EVE lets you specify more than one file name on the EDIT/TPU command line. EVE reads each file, and applies the file related qualifiers to each file. o EVE lets you use logical names and wildcards, to specify the file ---for example, *.TXT. You can create and edit more than one file in an editing session. o If more than one file matches your wildcard input file---for example, if there are two or more files matching *.TXT or other wildcard abbreviation---EVE displays a list of the matching files so you can choose the one you want. For more information, use the online help in EVE and read the topic called Choices Buffer. o If you specify more than one wildcard input file, EVE displays the list of matching files only for the first wildcard input file. For other wildcard input files having more than one matching file, EVE issues a warning message that only one ambiguous file name is allowed on the EDIT/TPU command line. o If more than one file matches your wildcard file name, EVE delays applying the following qualifiers (or their defaults) until after you resolve the file name: /[NO]MODIFY /[NO]OUTPUT /[NO]READ_ONLY /START_POSITION /[NO]WRITE If you specify multiple input files on the EDIT/TPU command line, these qualifiers apply to each buffer. They do not affect buffers you create during the editing session. o If you use a search list to specify the input file or use wildcards for the device (disk) or directory (such as [...]), EVE gets the first matching file in the search list or directory tree. If none of the files in the search list exists, EVE creates an empty buffer using the first file name in the search list (unless you used /NOCREATE). 3 Programming The DEC Text Processing Utility (DECTPU) provides a structured progamming language with an interpreter, compiler, and other software components, for creating text editors and other applications. DECTPU has a callable interface so you can call editing functions from a program written in BLISS, C, FORTRAN, or other language. EVE (Extensible Versatile Editor) is the default DECTPU application. You can use DECTPU to customize EVE or to create your own applications. The EVE source files are available online as examples of DECTPU programming and as a kind of run-time library of DECTPU procedures. For a list of the EVE source files, use the following DCL command: $ DIRECTORY SYS$EXAMPLES:EVE$*.TPU 3 Qualifiers Qualifier formats Defaults --------------------------------------------------------------------- /CHARACTER_SET[=character_set] /CHARACTER_SET=DEC_MCS /[NO]COMMAND[=command-file] /COMMAND=TPU$COMMAND.TPU /[NO]CREATE /CREATE /[NO]DEBUG[=debug-file] /NODEBUG /[NO]DISPLAY[=interface] /DISPLAY=CHARACTER_CELL /[NO]INITIALIZATION[=init-file] /INITIALIZATION=EVE$INIT.EVE /INTERFACE[=interface] /INTERFACE=CHARACTER_CELL /[NO]JOURNAL[=journal-file] /JOURNAL /[NO]MODIFY /MODIFY /[NO]OUTPUT[=output-file] /OUTPUT /[NO]READ_ONLY /NOREAD_ONLY /[NO]RECOVER /NORECOVER /[NO]SECTION[=section-file] /SECTION=TPU$SECTION /START_POSITION=(row[,column]) /START_POSITION=(1,1) /[NO]WORK[=work-file] /WORK=SYS$SCRATCH:TPU$WORK.TPU$WORK /[NO]WRITE /WRITE NOTE: Some qualifiers and their defaults are EVE-specific. Other DECTPU applications may handle some qualifiers differently. For more information, see the DEC Text Processing Utility Reference Manual. 3 /CHARACTER_SET /CHARACTER_SET[={DEC_MCS (default) | ISO_LATIN1 | GENERAL}] Determines the character set you want DECTPU to use to display 8-bit characters. The choice of character set affects how DECTPU performs the following operations on characters: o Converting to lowercase o Converting to uppercase o Inverting case o Removing diacritical marks o Converting to uppercase and removing diacritical marks The choice of character set also affects how your text appears when printed. For the text displayed in DECTPU to look the same when printed, you must choose the same character set for both DECTPU and the printer. There are two ways to specify the character set you want to use: o Define the TPU$CHARACTER_SET logical name to specify the character set. This lets you use that character set for all editing sessions--- including when you invoke DECTPU within MAIL or other utilities. You can put the definition in your LOGIN.COM file. For example, the following commands define TPU$CHARACTER_SET as ISO_LATIN1, and then invoke DECTPU using that character set: $ DEFINE TPU$CHARACTER_SET iso_latin1 $ EDIT/TPU o Use /CHARACTER_SET= and specify the character set on the command line. This overrides any definition of the TPU$CHARACTER_SET logical name. By default, DECTPU uses the DEC_MCS character set. For example, the following command invokes DECTPU, using the GENERAL character set: $ EDIT/TPU /CHARACTER_SET=general If the character set you specify either with /CHARACTER_SET or by defining TPU$CHARACTER_SET is invalid, the editing session is aborted, returning you to the DCL level. 3 /COMMAND /COMMAND[=command-file] (default) /NOCOMMAND Determines the DECTPU command file you want to use, if any. A command file contains DECTPU procedures and executable statements to extend the editor. For example, you can use a command file to create additional EVE commands, define keys, or set attributes. You can also use a command file to set up a special text-processing environment for creating your own DECTPU application or for batch editing. You cannot use wildcards to specify the command file. You can specify only one command file at a time. Default file type is .TPU. There are three ways to specify the command file you want to use: o Name the command file TPU$COMMAND.TPU. By default, DECTPU looks for this command file in your current directory. Thus, you can have a different command file for each directory or subdirectory without having to specify the command file each time. o Define the TPU$COMMAND logical name to specify the command file. This lets you use that command file for all editing sessions--- including when you invoke DECTPU within MAIL or other utilities--- and lets you keep that file in any convenient directory or subdirectory. The logical name overrides the search for the TPU$COMMAND.TPU file. You can put the definition in your LOGIN.COM file. For example, the following commands define TPU$COMMAND as MYPROCS.TPU in your top-level, login directory and then invoke DECTPU using that command file: $ DEFINE TPU$COMMAND sys$login:myprocs $ EDIT/TPU o Use /COMMAND= and specify the command file on the command line. This overrides any definition of the TPU$COMMAND logical name and overrides the default search for the TPU$COMMAND.TPU file. For example, the following command invokes DECTPU, using a command file named MYPROCS.TPU in your current, default directory: $ EDIT/TPU /COMMAND=myprocs If the command file you specify either with /COMMAND or by defining TPU$COMMAND is not found, the editing session is aborted, returning you to the DCL level. If you do not want a command file executed, use /NOCOMMAND--- typically if you defined the TPU$COMMAND logical name or created a TPU$COMMAND.TPU file but do not want it used for a particular editing session. Also, /NOCOMMAND makes startup faster because DECTPU then does not search for a command file and does not have to compile and execute code at startup. At startup, DECTPU compiles and executes the command file, if one is being used, after loading a section file (if any) and before EVE executes an initialization file (if any). Thus, you can use a command file in conjunction with a section file and an initialization file. Procedures, settings, and key definitions in a command file override those in the section file. For more information about command files, see the DEC Text Processing Utility Reference Manual or use the online help in EVE and read the topic called Command Files. In EVE, you can create or update a command file by using the SAVE ATTRIBUTES command to save menu definitions for the DECwindows interface and most global settings ("attributes"). For more information, see the Extensible Versatile Editor Reference Manual or use the online help in EVE and read the topic called Attributes. 3 /CREATE /CREATE (default) /NOCREATE Determines whether a buffer is created when the input file is not found. Processing this qualifier depends on the DECTPU application you are using. For EVE, the default is /CREATE. If any input file specified on the command line does not exist, EVE creates a buffer using the file name and file type as the buffer name; or if you do not specify an input file, EVE creates an empty buffer named MAIN. Use /NOCREATE to edit only existing files. Thus, if none of the input files are found, the editing session is aborted returning you to the DCL level, as in the following example: $ EDIT/TPU old.dat,new.dat /NOCREATE Input file or files do not exist: OLD.DAT,NEW.DAT $ 3 /DEBUG /DEBUG[=debug-file] /NODEBUG (default) Determines whether you run a DECTPU debug file to test procedures for an application you are creating. DECTPU compiles, and executes the debug file---before executing TPU$INIT_PROCEDURE. Using /DEBUG without specifying a debug file runs the default DECTPU debugger---TPU$DEBUG.TPU, which provides commands to manipulate variables and to control program execution. To start editing the code in the file you are debugging, use the GO command. For more information about the debugger, read the comments in the TPU$DEBUG.TPU source file in SYSSHARE, or see the DEC Text Processing Utility Reference Manual or use the online help in EVE as follows: Command: HELP TPU Debugger There are two ways to specify a debug file of your own: o Define the TPU$DEBUG logical name to specify the debug file, and then use EDIT/TPU/DEBUG. Defining the logical name does NOT by itself run the debugger when you invoke DECTPU. It only specifies which debug file is run when you use /DEBUG. You can put the definition in your LOGIN.COM file. o Use /DEBUG= and specify the debug file on the command line. For example, the following command edits a file named MYPROCS.TPU, using a debug file named MYDEBUG.TPU: $ EDIT/TPU myprocs.tpu /DEBUG=mydebug DECTPU assumes the debug file is in SYSSHARE. If your debug file is stored elsewhere, specify the device (disk) and directory of that file. You cannot use wildcards to specify the debug file. You can use only one debug file at a time. Default file type is .TPU. 3 /DISPLAY /DISPLAY[={CHARACTER_CELL (default) | DECWINDOWS | MOTIF}] /NODISPLAY Determines the type of screen display, if any. /DISPLAY is the same as /INTERFACE. For example, the following command invokes DECTPU with the Motif DECwindows interface: $ EDIT/TPU /DISPLAY=DECWINDOWS Then, if DECwindows Motif is available, DECTPU displays the editing session in a separate window on your workstation screen and enables DECwindows features---for example, the EVE screen layout then includes a menu bar and scroll bars, and you can use M1 to move the cursor and select text. If DECwindows is not available, DECTPU works as if on a character-cell terminal. For information about using EVE on DECwindows, use the online help in EVE and read the topic called DECwindows Differences. To specify your preferred display, you can define the logical name TPU$DISPLAY_MANAGER as CHARACTER_CELL, DECWINDOWS, or MOTIF. Use /NODISPLAY for batch jobs or when you are using an unsupported terminal. For batch jobs, you typically use a DECTPU command file or EVE initialization file, as in the following example, which uses a command file named BATCH.TPU: EDIT/TPU /NODISPLAY /COMMAND=batch This batch file should comprise a complete editing session, including EXIT or QUIT. Note that some EVE commands cannot be used in batch because they prompt for a key press or other interactive response. 3 /INITIALIZATION /INITIALIZATION[=init-file] (default) /NOINITIALIZATION Determines the initialization file you want to use, if any. Processing this qualifier depends on the DECTPU application you are using. An EVE initialization file contains a list of EVE commands you want executed, typically to set margins, tab stops, and other attributes, or to define keys that you do not otherwise save in a section file. You cannot use wildcards to specify the initialization file. You can specify only one initialization file at a time. Default file type is .EVE. There are three ways to specify the EVE initialization file you want to use: o Name the initialization file EVE$INIT.EVE. By default, EVE first looks for this initialization file in your current directory. If the file is not found there, EVE then looks for it in SYS$LOGIN (your top-level, login directory). Thus, you can have different initialization files for different directories or subdirectories, and you can have a "standard" initialization file in SYS$LOGIN for editing in directories that do not have an EVE$INIT.EVE file. o Define the EVE$INIT logical name to specify the initialization file. This lets you use that initialization file for all editing sessions---including when you invoke DECTPU within MAIL or other utilities---and lets you keep that file in any convenient directory or subdirectory. Defining the logical name overrides the search for the EVE$INIT.EVE file. If you omit parts of the file specification from the logical name definition---for example, if you do not specify a device (disk)---EVE supplies them from SYS$DISK:EVE$INIT.EVE or SYS$LOGINEVE$INIT.EVE. You can put the definition in your LOGIN.COM file. For example, the following commands define EVE$INIT as MYINIT.EVE in your top-level, login directory and then invoke EVE using that initialization file: $ DEFINE EVE$INIT sys$login:myinit $ EDIT/TPU o Use /INITIALIZATION= and specify the initialization file on the command line. This overrides any definition of the EVE$INIT logical name and overrides the default search for the EVE$INIT.EVE file. If you omit parts of the file specification---for example, if you do not specify a device (disk)---EVE supplies them first from the logical name (if defined), and then from SYS$DISK:EVE$INIT.EVE or SYS$LOGINEVE$INIT.EVE. For example, the following command invokes EVE, using an initialization file named MYINIT.EVE in your current, default directory: $ EDIT/TPU /INITIALIZATION=myinit If you do not want an initialization file executed, use /NOINITIALIZATION---typically if you defined the EVE$INIT logical name or created an EVE$INIT.EVE file but do not want it executed for a particular editing session. Also, /NOINITIALIZATION makes startup faster because EVE then does not search for an initialization file and does not have to parse commands at startup. At startup, EVE executes an initialization file (if any) after DECTPU loads the section file and executes a command file (if any). Thus, you can use an initialization file in conjunction with a DECTPU command file. Settings and key definitions in an initialization file override those in a section file or command file. When you invoke EVE, commands in an initialization file for margins, tab stops, and other buffer settings apply to the MAIN buffer (or buffers initially created from your input files) and to an EVE system buffer named $DEFAULTS$. Buffers created during the session will have the same settings as $DEFAULTS$. For more information, use the online help in EVE and read the topic called Defaults. If a command in an initialization file is incomplete---for example, if a command requires a file name, search string, or other parameter ---EVE prompts you for the required information before going on. You can also execute an initialization file during an EVE session by using the @ command (at sign). This is useful to execute a series of related commands or to set attributes or define keys for particular kinds of editing. An initialization file is somewhat slower than a section file or DECTPU command file, depending on the number of commands to be executed. If you want to define several keys, you should save them in a section file. For more information, see the Extensible Versatile Editor Reference Manual or use the online help in EVE and read the topic called Initialization Files. 3 /INTERFACE /INTERFACE[={CHARACTER_CELL (default) | DECWINDOWS |MOTIF}] Same as /DISPLAY---determines the interface or screen display you want. For example, the following command invokes DECTPU with the DECwindows Motif interface: $ EDIT/TPU /INTERFACE=DECWINDOWS Then, if DECwindows Motif is available, DECTPU displays the editing session in a separate window on your workstation screen and enables DECwindows features---for example, the EVE screen layout includes a menu bar and scroll bars, and you can use M1 to move the cursor and select text. If DECwindows Motif is not available, DECTPU works as if on a character-cell terminal. For information about using EVE on DECwindows, use the online help in EVE and read the topic called DECwindows Differences. 3 /JOURNAL /JOURNAL[=journal-file] (default) /NOJOURNAL Determines the type of journaling, if any. Journaling records your edits so that if a system failure interrupts your editing session, you can recover your work. Processing this qualifier depends on the DECTPU application you are using. Normally, journal files are deleted when you exit or quit. If a system failure occurs during your editing session, such as a break in communications between your terminal and computer, the journal files are saved. For information about recovering your work, see help on /RECOVER. +-------------------------- NOTE --------------------------+ | Journal files record information about the text you edit. | | Therefore, if you are editing confidential data, make sure | | the journal files, as well as the text files, are secure. | +------------------------------------------------------------+ There are two types of journaling, as follows: o Buffer-change journaling creates a journal file for each text buffer. This is the EVE default. Buffer-change journaling works on DECwindows or character-cell terminals. The journal file name derives from the name of the file or buffer being edited and the file type .TPU$JOURNAL---for example: Text buffers Buffer-change journal files ------------------------------------------------- MAIN MAIN.TPU$JOURNAL JABBER.TXT JABBER_TXT.TPU$JOURNAL GUMBO_RECIPE.RNO GUMBO_RECIPE_RNO.TPU$JOURNAL NEW TEST DATA NEW_TEST_DATA.TPU$JOURNAL * TEMP * __TEMP__.TPU$JOURNAL Buffer-change journal files are created in the directory defined by the TPU$JOURNAL logical name. Default is SYS$SCRATCH, which is usually your top-level, login directory. Because buffer-change journal files may be quite large---even larger than the files you edit---you may want to define TPU$JOURNAL as a different disk and directory. Some editing operations may be slower because of buffer-change journaling, depending on the type or extent of changes, such as cutting a large box, or pasting a large amount of text from the DECwindows clipboard. o Keystroke journaling creates a single journal file for the editing session, regardless of the number of buffers you create. The journal file records every keystroke in the editing session, whether text or commands. To enable keystroke journaling, use /JOURNAL= and specify the journal file you want created. You cannot use wildcards to specify the keystroke journal file. Default file type is .TJL. For example, the following command invokes DECTPU creating a keystroke journal file named MYJOURNAL.TJL in your current, default directory: $ EDIT/TPU /JOURNAL=myjournal Keystroke journaling does NOT work on DECwindows and has other restrictions affecting recovery (see help on /RECOVER). Keystroke journaling is useful to reproduce a problem (for example, if you want to submit an SPR) or to journal an editing session in which you create LEARN sequences and define keys interactively. If you use keystroke journaling, EVE also creates a buffer-change journal file for each text buffer. This double journaling may slow performance, depending on the kind of edits you make. To disable buffer-change journaling for a particular buffer or for all your buffers, use SET NOJOURNALING commands during your editing session. If you do not want any journaling, use /NOJOURNAL, which disables both keystroke journaling and buffer-change journaling. This may make startup and some editing operations faster but risks losing your work if a system failure occurs during the editing session. Typically you use /NOJOURNAL if you are also using /NOMODIFY, /NOOUTPUT, /READ_ONLY, or /NOWRITE to view a file without making any changes. If you invoke EVE with /NOJOURNAL, you can enable buffer- change journaling during your editing session by using SET JOURNALING commands. For more information about journaling and recovery, see the Extensible Versatile Editor Reference Manual or use the online help in EVE and read the topic called Journal Files. +----------------------------- NOTE ------------------------------+ | Although journaling and recovery are quite reliable, the last few | | edits before a system failure may be lost. The safest way to | | protect your work against a system failure is to write out your | | edits frequently---particularly during all-day editing sessions. | +-------------------------------------------------------------------+ 3 /MODIFY /MODIFY (default) /NOMODIFY Determines whether you can modify the main (or first) buffer. If you specify multiple input files on the EDIT/TPU command line, this qualifier applies to each buffer. Does not affect other buffers you create during the editing session. By default, DECTPU lets the buffer be modified---you can edit text in the buffer, and exiting writes out the buffer to a file, if the buffer has been modified (unless you used /NOWRITE or /READ_ONLY). Use /NOMODIFY to view a file without making any changes. You can then use cursor-movement commands but cannot change the text. If you do not specify /MODIFY or /NOMODIFY, the application is expected to determine the default behavior. For EVE, the main buffer is made modifiable (as well as buffers initially created from your input files). For EVE, using /READ_ONLY or /NOWRITE makes the buffer unmodifiable unless you also use /MODIFY. For example, the following command edits a file named PRACTICE.TXT, making the buffer read-only and making it modifiable, so you can practice editing or test procedures without writing a file: $ EDIT/TPU practice.txt /READ_ONLY /MODIFY In EVE, the status line shows whether the buffer is unmodifiable. If the buffer is modifiable, the status line shows the mode (insert or overstrike). You can change the modification attribute of the buffer during your editing session by using the SET BUFFER command. 3 /OUTPUT /OUTPUT[=output-file] (default) /NOOUTPUT Determines the output file, if any, for the main (or first) buffer. If you specify multiple input files on the EDIT/TPU command line, this qualifier applies to each buffer. Does not affect other buffers you create during the editing session. By default, the output file has the same specifications as the input file with a version number one higher than the highest version of the input file, or version 1 if you are creating a new file. Use /OUTPUT= and specify a file if you want the output file written in a different directory or to have a different name or file type. For example, the following command edits a file named ROUGH.LIS in your current directory and, on exiting, writes the output file to FINAL.TXT in your top-level, login directory: $ EDIT/TPU rough.lis /OUTPUT=sys$login:final.txt You cannot use wildcards to specify the output file---you specify one output file at a time. There is no default file type. If you omit the file type or other parts of the output file specification, such as the device (disk) or directory, EVE uses the corresponding parts of the input file specification, if there is one. In EVE, using /OUTPUT= and specifying an output file modifies the buffer, so that even if you make no changes to the text, exiting writes the buffer to the specified output file. In EVE, using /NOOUTPUT sets the MAIN (or first) buffer to read-only (sometimes called write-locked), so that exiting does not write out that buffer to a file. This is useful to view a file without making any changes. If you change your mind and want to write out the buffer before exiting, use the WRITE FILE, SAVE FILE, or SAVE FILE AS command. Also, you can change the read/write attribute of the buffer during your editing session by using the SET BUFFER command. Be careful using the /OUTPUT qualifier when you specify multiple input files because the qualifier applies to all input files on the EDIT/TPU command line. If you specify an output file name and type, each buffer created from an input file would have the same output file name and type. You can use the /OUTPUT qualifier with multiple input files to write the output files to a different disk or directory. For example, the following command invokes EVE such that each output file has the same name as the original input file but is written to the [.NEW] directory: $ EDIT/TPU /OUT=[.NEW] a.txt,b.txt,c.rno,d.tmp 3 /READ_ONLY /READ_ONLY /NOREAD_ONLY (default) Determines whether exiting writes the main (or first) buffer to a file. If you specify multiple input files on the EDIT/TPU command line, this qualifier applies to each buffer. Does not affect other buffers you create during the editing session. /READ_ONLY is the same as /NOWRITE. For EVE, this makes the MAIN (or first) buffer write-locked and also makes it unmodifiable, unless you used /MODIFY. Use /READ_ONLY to view a file without making any changes. For example, the following command lets you view a file named MEMO.TXT, so you can use cursor-movement commands but cannot change the text: $ EDIT/TPU memo.txt /READ_ONLY /NOREAD_ONLY is the same as /WRITE---on exiting, EVE writes out the MAIN (or first) buffer to a file if the buffer has been modified, and if necessary, EVE prompts you for the output file name. In EVE, the status line shows whether the buffer is read-only or write. Also, you can change the read/write and modification attributes of the buffer during your editing session by using the SET BUFFER command. 3 /RECOVER /RECOVER /NORECOVER (default) Determines whether DECTPU recovers your edits by reading the journal file from the interrupted editing session. (See help on /JOURNAL.) There are two ways to recover your edits, depending on the type of journaling you used: o If you used buffer-change journaling, which is the EVE default, you can recover one or more buffers at a time and you can recover buffers from different editing sessions. For example, the following command invokes EVE to recover the text of a file named JABBER.TXT: $ EDIT/TPU jabber.txt /RECOVER This is the same as invoking EVE and using the following command: Command: RECOVER BUFFER jabber.txt If there is more than one buffer-change journal file with the same name---for example, you may have two or more MAIN.TPU$JOURNAL files from different editing sessions---the recovery uses the highest version number available. To recover several text buffers, one after another, use the RECOVER BUFFER ALL command. Recovery with a buffer-change journal file restores only your text ---it does not restore settings, key definitions, and other customizations and it does not restore the contents of the Insert Here buffer or other system buffers. The recovery is usually quite fast. New text or other changes are then journaled. The recovery does not re-create deleted files. If you deleted or renamed the source file associated with a buffer-change journal, the recovery fails. The source file is either the file initially read into the buffer (if any), or the last version of the file written from the buffer before the system failure. If you specify multiple input files on the EDIT/TPU command line, EVE tries to recover each file. o If you used keystroke journaling, you recover your editing session by reissuing the same command for the original, aborted editing session---including all qualifiers---and adding /RECOVER. EVE then recovers your editing session in a "player piano" fashion. For example, the following commands invoke DECTPU creating a keystroke journal file, and then, after a system failure, recover the editing session: $ EDIT/TPU /JOURNAL=myjournal.tjl . . *** system failure *** . . $ EDIT/TPU /JOURNAL=myjournal.tjl /RECOVER Typically, after the recovery, you exit to save your edits. Keystroke journaling does not work on DECwindows and has other restrictions, as follows. These restrictions do NOT apply to buffer- change journaling. o To recover your edits with a keystroke journal file, all relevant files must be in the same state as at the start of the session being recovered---including any files you wrote out (saved) before the system failure. Therefore, before doing the recovery, you should rename the saved versions or move them to a different directory, to ensure that the recovery uses the original versions of the files. You must specify multiple input files in the same order as in the original command line. o Check that any logical names for your section file, command file, and initialization file are defined as for the original editing session, and that the recovery will use the correct version of these files. o Check that the following terminal settings are the same as when you began the original editing session, because they may affect how your keystrokes are replayed: Device_Type Edit_mode Eightbit Page Width o Recovery with a keystroke journal file may fail or may not work properly if you used CTRL/C during the original editing session. CTRL/C is not recorded in the keystroke journal file. Therefore, during recovery, an operation that was canceled with CTRL/C is replayed without interruption; this is likely to affect how the remaining keystrokes are replayed. o If you used EVE in a subprocess (as a "kept" editor), the keystroke journal file records ATTACH, DCL, and SPAWN commands in EVE, but does not record operations done in the other process or subprocess. If these other operations affected any files used in the original editing session---for example, if you spawned a subprocess from EVE and then purged, renamed, deleted, or modified any relevant files---the recovery may fail or may not work properly. o If you used the EVE command DCL, the recovery with a keystroke journal file may fail or may not work properly, particularly if you cut a file name from a directory list in the DCL buffer, and pasted it into an EVE command line. The keystroke recovery replays the operations, but the directory list or the file name may not be the same as in the original session. For more information about journaling and recovery, see the Extensible Versatile Editor Reference Manual or use the online help in EVE and read the topic called Journal Files. +----------------------------- NOTE ------------------------------+ | Although journaling and recovery are quite reliable, the last few | | edits before a system failure may be lost. The safest way to | | protect your work against a system failure is to write out your | | edits frequently---particularly during all-day editing sessions. | +-------------------------------------------------------------------+ 3 /SECTION /SECTION[=section-file] (default) /NOSECTION Determines the section file you want to use, if any. A section file contains, in binary form, key definitions, compiled procedures, and other extensions. Effectively, the section file is the DECTPU application you run---whether a customized version of EVE or an application you have created. DECTPU assumes the section file is in SYS$SHARE. If your section file is stored elsewhere, specify the device (disk) and directory of that file. You cannot use wildcards to specify the section file. You use only one section file at a time. Default file type is .TPU$SECTION. The default section file is defined system-wide by the logical name TPU$SECTION, which specifies the standard EVE section file--- EVE$SECTION.TPU$SECTION. There are two ways to specify the section file you want to use: o Define the TPU$SECTION logical name to specify the section file. This lets you use that section file for all editing sessions--- including when you invoke DECTPU within MAIL or other utilities. Your definition overrides the system-wide default. You can put the definition in your LOGIN.COM file. For example, the following commands define the default section file as MYSECTION.TPU$SECTION in your top-level, login directory and invoke DECTPU using that section file instead of the standard EVE section file: $ DEFINE TPU$SECTION sys$login:mysection $ EDIT/TPU o Use /SECTION= and specify the section file on the command line. This overrides any definition of the TPU$SECTION logical name, whether a definition of your own or the system-wide default. For example, the following command invokes DECTPU, using a section file named MYSECTION.TPU$SECTION in your top-level, login directory: $ EDIT/TPU /SECTION=sys$login:mysection If you do not want DECTPU to use any section file, use /NOSECTION. This prevents even the default EVE interface from being used. DECTPU will be unusable unless you specify a command file with DECTPU procedures and executable statements that set up a text-processing environment. Use /NOSECTION when you are creating your own application without using EVE as a base or if you are using /NODISPLAY for batch editing. For example, the following command invokes DECTPU without a section file, using a command file named USER_APPL.TPU: $ EDIT/TPU /NOSECTION /COMMAND=user_appl /NODISPLAY At startup, DECTPU first loads a section file, if one is being used, before compiling and executing a command file (if any) and before EVE executes an initialization file (if any). Thus, procedures, settings, and key definitions in a command file (.TPU) or initialization file (.EVE) override those in a section file. To create a section file, do either of the following: o In EVE, use the SAVE EXTENDED EVE command. For example, the following command creates a section file named MYSECTION.TPU$SECTION in your current, default directory: Command: SAVE EXTENDED EVE mysection DISK$1:[USER]MYSECTION.TPU$SECTION;1 created 903 procedures, 1168 variables, 621 keys saved o In a DECTPU command file, use the SAVE built-in, usually at the end of the command file. For example, the following statements create a section file named MYSECTION.TPU$SECTION in your top- level, login directory: SAVE ("sys$login:mysection"); ! Create the section file EXIT; ! Done---end of command file A section file is cumulative; it saves the current key definitions and other customizations---and those already in the section file you are using. In EVE, the section file saves the following: * Compiled procedures (your own and EVE's) * Global settings ("attributes") * Key definitions and LEARN sequences * Menu definitions for the DECwindows interface A section file usually does NOT save the following: * Margins, tab stops, and other buffer settings * Width or number of windows * Contents of EVE system buffers, such as the Insert Here buffer A section file created with the DECwindows interface will work on character-cell terminals and conversely. However, some DECwindows features are not available on character-cell terminals (such as shifted function keys and the clipboard). +----------------------------- NOTE -----------------------------+ | A section file created on OpenVMS will work on ULTRIX and | | conversely so long as the procedures and statements saved do not | | involve system-specific features and differences, such as file | | names, directories, and so on. | +------------------------------------------------------------------+ For more information, see the DEC Text Processing Utility Reference Manual or Extensible Versatile Editor Reference Manual, or use the online help in EVE and read the topic called Section Files. 3 /START_POSITION /START_POSITION=(row[,column]) Determines the row and column where the cursor first appears in the main (or first) buffer. If you specify multiple input files on the EDIT/TPU command line, this qualifier applies to each buffer. Does not affect other buffers you create during the editing session. For EVE, the default start position is 1,1, which is the upper left corner of the MAIN (or first) buffer---row 1, column 1. Does not affect the initial cursor position when you create other buffers during the editing session and does not limit the buffer size. Use /START_POSITION to begin editing at a particular line (or row) or at a particular character position (or column), such as when you want to skip over a standard heading in a file, or if a batch log file or error message tells you there is an error on a given line of a program, you can specify that line number as the starting row, so that when you edit the program source file, the cursor moves directly to that line. For example, the following command edits a file named TEST.COM, putting the cursor on line 10, column 5: $ EDIT/TPU test.com /START_POSITION=(10,5) If you simply want to begin editing at the start of a particular line in the buffer or input file, you can omit the second parameter (the column) and you need not use parentheses. For example, the following command edits a file named MEMO.TXT putting the cursor at the start of line 10: $ EDIT/TPU memo.txt /START_POSITION=10 3 /WORK /WORK[=work-file] (default) /NOWORK Determines the work file, if any, that DECTPU uses to swap memory for editing very large files. The work file is automatically deleted when you exit. If you invoke DECTPU and disable the /WORK qualifier, DECTPU does not have a work file. In this case, the amount of memory available to DECTPU limits the size of the files you can edit. You cannot use wildcards to specify the work file. There is one work file per editing session. Default file type is .TPU$WORK. By default, DECTPU creates a work file named TPU$WORK.TPU$WORK in SYS$SCRATCH, which is usually your top-level, login directory. There are two ways to specify a different work file: o Define the TPU$WORK logical name to specify the work file. This is useful if you want the work file created in an area other than SYS$SCRATCH, such as on a larger disk. You can put the definition in your LOGIN.COM file. o Use /WORK= and specify the work file you want created. This overrides any definition of the TPU$WORK logical name. For example, the following command invokes DECTPU, specifying the work file to be MYWORK.TPU$WORK: $ EDIT/TPU /WORK=mywork To create the work file in an area other than SYS$SCRATCH, specify the device (disk) and directory of the work file. If you not want DECTPU to create a workfile, use /NOWORK. This reduces consumption of system resources and makes startup faster. Generally, you can use /NOWORK unless your system has limited memory or unless you edit very large files or large numbers of files. 3 /WRITE /WRITE (default) /NOWRITE Determines whether exiting writes the main (or first) buffer to a file. If you specify multiple input files on the EDIT/TPU command line, this qualifier applies to each buffer. Does not affect other buffers you create during the editing session. /WRITE is the same as /NOREAD_ONLY---on exiting, EVE writes out the MAIN (or first) buffer to a file if the buffer has been modified, and if necessary, EVE prompts you for the output file name. /NOWRITE is the same as /READ_ONLY. For EVE, this makes the MAIN (or first) buffer write-locked and also makes it unmodifiable, unless you used /MODIFY. Use /NOWRITE to view a file without making any changes. For example, the following command lets you view a file named STAFFMEMO.TXT, so you can use cursor-movement commands but cannot change the text: $ EDIT/TPU staffmemo.txt /NOWRITE In EVE, the status line shows whether the buffer is read-only or write. Also, you can change the read/write and modification attributes of the buffer during your editing session by using the SET BUFFER command.

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