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1 SET

Defines or changes, for the current terminal session or batch job, characteristics associated with files and devices owned by the process. Format SET option 2 Description The following table lists all the SET command options, including those generally reserved for use by system operators and managers. Option Function ACCOUNTING Controls the current accounting file. AUDIT Provides the management interface to the security auditing system. BROADCAST Determines which messages will be broadcast to SYS$OUTPUT. CARD_READER Defines the default ASCII translation mode for a card reader. CLUSTER/EXPECTED_ Sets the total expected votes in the OpenVMS VOTES Cluster to a value that you specify or, if no value is specified, sets the total votes to a value determined by the system COMMAND Adds commands that are defined in a command description file to your process command set or a command tables file. CONTROL Enables or disables interrupts caused by Ctrl /T or Ctrl/Y. CPU Changes the user capabilities associated with the specified CPUs. DAY Overrides the default day type specified in the user authorization file (UAF). DEFAULT Establishes a device and directory as the current default for file specifications. DEVICE Defines device characteristics. DEVICE/SERVED Lets you make a disk on a local node available to all the nodes on an OpenVMS Cluster. DIRECTORY Modifies the characteristics of one or more directories. DISPLAY Redirects the output of a DECwindows application. ENTRY Changes the current status or attributes of a job not currently executing in a queue. FILE Modifies the characteristics of one or more files. HOST Connects your terminal to a remote VAX processor by way of the current host processor. HOST/DTE Connects your system to a remote system by way of an outgoing terminal line. HOST/DUP Connects your terminal to a storage controller through the appropriate bus for that controller. HOST/HSC Connects your terminal to a remote HSC50 disk and tape controller through the computer interconnect (CI) bus. HOST/LAT Connects your terminal to a specified service available in the local area network (LAN), establishing one session for communication between your terminal and that service. HOST/RLOGIN Allows you to log in to a remote host over a TCP/IP connection and start an interactive terminal session by accessing the RLOGIN application. HOST/TELNET Connects you to a remote host over a TCP/IP connection by invoking the TELNET application. HOST/TN3270 Connects you to a remote IBM host over a TCP/IP connection, causing the local keyboard to emulate an IBM 3279-class terminal keyboard by invoking the TN3270 terminal emulator. KEY Changes the current keypad state setting. LOGINS Allows or disallows users to log in to the system. MAGTAPE Defines characteristics of a magnetic tape device. MESSAGE Overrides or supplements system messages. NETWORK Registers the attributes of a network service. ON Controls whether the command interpreter checks for an error condition following the execution of commands in a command procedure. OUTPUT_RATE Sets the rate at which output is written to a batch job log file. PASSWORD Lets users change their own passwords; lets system managers change the system password. PREFIX Allows you to set a prefix control string for verified command lines. PRINTER Defines printer characteristics. PROCESS Defines execution characteristics of the current process. PROMPT Defines the DCL prompt. PROTECTION Establishes the default protection to be /DEFAULT applied to all files subsequently created. QUEUE Changes the current status or attributes of the specified queue. RESTART_VALUE Establishes a test value for restarting portions of batch jobs. RIGHTS_LIST Lets users modify the process rights list; lets privileged users modify the system rights list. RMS_DEFAULT Provides default multiblock and multibuffer count values to be used by RMS for file operations. SECURITY Modifies the security profile of an object. SERVER Controls starting, stopping, and restarting of the security server. The security server maintains information stored in the system intrusion and proxy databases. SYMBOL Controls access to local and global symbols in command procedures. TERMINAL Defines terminal characteristics. TIME Resets the system clock to the specified value. VERIFY Controls whether the command interpreter displays lines in command procedures as it executes them. VOLUME Modifies the characteristics of one or more Files-11 volumes. WORKING_SET Changes the current working set limit or quota. 2 ACCOUNTING Controls the current accounting file. Requires OPER (operator) privilege. Format SET ACCOUNTING 3 Qualifiers /DISABLE /DISABLE[=(keyword[,...])] Prevents the tracking of the resources specified by the keywords. The following table lists the keywords you can use to specify the type of resource. Keyword Type of Resource IMAGE Resources used by an image LOGIN_FAILURE Resources used by an unsuccessful attempt to log in MESSAGE (Unformatted record written to the accounting file by a call to the $SNDJBC system service) PRINT Resources used by a print job PROCESS Resources used by a process You do not need to stop the tracking of all processes and images. You can prevent resources being tracked for specific types of process and for images running in these types of process. The following table lists the keywords you can use to specify the type of process. Keyword Type of Process BATCH Batch process DETACHED Detached process INTERACTIVE Interactive process NETWORK Network process SUBPROCESS Subprocess (the parent process can be a batch, detached, network, or interactive process) If the system is no longer tracking any resources, /DISABLE closes the current accounting file. If you use the /DISABLE qualifier and omit the keywords, the current accounting file does not track any resources, and the system closes the file. /ENABLE /ENABLE[=(keyword[,...])] Enables the tracking of the specified resources, and opens the current accounting file if it is not already open. The following table lists the keywords you can use to specify the type of resource. Keyword Type of Resource IMAGE Resources used by an image LOGIN_FAILURE Resources used by an unsuccessful attempt to log in MESSAGE (Unformatted record written to the accounting file by a call to the $SNDJBC system service) PRINT Resources used by a print job PROCESS Resources used by a process You do not need to track all processes and images. You can track resources for specific types of process and for images running in those types of process. The following table lists the keywords you can use to specify the type of process. Keyword Type of Process BATCH Batch process DETACHED Detached process INTERACTIVE Interactive process NETWORK Network process SUBPROCESS Subprocess (the parent process can be a batch, detached, network, or interactive process) If you use the /ENABLE qualifier and omit the keywords, the current accounting file tracks all resources. /LOG Writes information to the current SYS$OUTPUT device as the command executes. /NEW_FILE Closes the current accounting file, and starts up a new version of it. The name of the new file depends on whether the logical name ACCOUNTNG is defined in your system logical name table. If this logical name is not defined, the SET ACCOUNTING command opens the file SYS$MANAGER:ACCOUNTNG.DAT. If this logical name is defined, the command opens the file that this logical name points to. If you omit the directory, SYS$MANAGER is the default, and if you omit the file type, .DAT is the default. The /NEW_FILE qualifier writes a file forward link record to the old file, and a file backward link record to the new file. These records contain the names of the old and new files respectively. 3 Examples 1.$ SET ACCOUNTING /DISABLE /ENABLE=(PROCESS,BATCH,INTERACTIVE) $ SET ACCOUNTING /ENABLE=IMAGE This example tells the system to track the resources used only by batch and interactive processes, and by images running in batch and interactive processes. It illustrates the cumulative effect of /ENABLE and /DISABLE qualifiers, and of SET ACCOUNTING commands. The /DISABLE qualifier prevents the tracking of all resources. The /ENABLE qualifier then tells the system to track the resources used by batch and interactive processes. The second SET ACCOUNTING command tells the system to track the resources used by images. 2.$ SET ACCOUNTING /NEW_FILE $ RENAME SYS$MANAGER:ACCOUNTNG.DAT;-1 WEEK_24_RESOURCES.DAT This example closes the current accounting file, opens a new version of it, and changes the name of the old file to WEEK_24_RESOURCES.DAT. 2 ACL Allows you to create or modify the access control list (ACL) of an object. Alternatively, you can use the OpenVMS access control list (ACL) editor to manipulate ACLs. NOTE This command has been superseded by the SET SECURITY command. Format SET ACL object-name 3 Parameter object-name Specifies the object whose ACL is being modified. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed in object names only if the object type is FILE. Each file must be a disk file on a Files-11 On-Disk Structure Level 2 formatted volume. If the object type is FILE, directory names in UIC format (*)]) are not allowed. Logical name tables must be system logical name tables. 3 Description The SET ACL command enables you to manipulate an entire ACL of an object, or to create, modify, or delete access control entries (ACEs) in the ACL of an object. (For information on the format of ACEs and ACLs, see the OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual.) To use the SET ACL command, specify the object name of the object whose ACL you want to manipulate. By default, the Access Control List editor assumes that the object whose ACL is being edited is a file. If the object is not a file, the /OBJECT_TYPE qualifier is required. The SET ACL command is used to add ACEs to an ACL by specifying the ACEs with the /ACL qualifier. For example, the following command adds an ACE to the ACL of the file SALARY85.DAT so that all users associated with the identifier PERSONNEL are allowed read (R) access to the file: $ SET ACL/ACL=(IDENTIFIER=PERSONNEL,ACCESS=READ) SALARY85.DAT If the object specified with the SET ACL command does not have an ACL, one is created. The SET ACL command provides the following qualifiers to manipulate ACEs and ACLs in various ways: /AFTER /DELETE /LIKE /NEW /REPLACE You can delete ACEs from an ACL by including the /DELETE qualifier and by specifying the ACEs with the /ACL qualifier. To delete all the ACEs except those with the PROTECTED option, include the /DELETE qualifier and specify the /ACL qualifier without specifying any ACEs. To delete all the ACEs including those with the PROTECTED option, include the /DELETE=ALL qualifier and specify the /ACL qualifier without specifying any ACEs. You can copy an ACL from one object to another by using the /LIKE qualifier. When using the /LIKE qualifier, you must specify the object type and object name. The ACL of the object specified with the /LIKE qualifier replaces the ACL of the object given with the command. You can replace existing ACEs in the ACL of the object specified with the command by using the /REPLACE qualifier. Any ACEs specified with the /ACL qualifier are deleted and replaced by those specified with the /REPLACE qualifier. The /NEW qualifier is used to delete all ACEs (including those with the PROTECTED option) before adding any ACEs specified by the /ACL, the /LIKE, or the /REPLACE qualifier. When referring to existing ACEs with the /DELETE, the /REPLACE, or the /AFTER qualifier, the existing ACE may be abbreviated. By default, any ACEs (except security alarm ACEs) added to an ACL are placed at the top of the ACL. Security alarm ACEs are always positioned at the top of the ACL, regardless of positioning qualifiers. Whenever the system receives a request for access to an object that has an ACL, the system searches each entry in the ACL from the first to the last for the first match it can find. If another match occurs further down in the ACL, it has no effect. Because the position of an ACE in an ACL is so important, you can use the /AFTER qualifier to correctly position an ACE. When you use the /AFTER qualifier, any additional ACEs are added after the specified ACE. The SET ACL command can also be used with the /EDIT qualifier to invoke the ACL editor. When the /EDIT qualifier is specified, only one object name is allowed. The following qualifiers can be used only when the /EDIT qualifier has been specified: /JOURNAL /MODE /RECOVER For more information on these qualifiers and the ACL editor in general, see the OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual. 3 Qualifiers /ACL /ACL[=(ace[,...])] Specifies one or more access control entries (ACEs) to be modified. When no ACE is specified, the entire access control list (ACL) is affected. Separate multiple ACEs with commas (,). The specified ACEs are inserted at the top of the ACL unless the /AFTER qualifier is given. (Note that security alarm ACEs are always placed at the beginning of the ACL.) /AFTER /AFTER=ace Indicates that all access control entries (ACEs) specified with the /ACL qualifier will be added after the ACE specified with the /AFTER qualifier. By default, any ACEs added to the ACL are always placed at the top of the list. (Note that security alarm ACEs are always placed at the beginning of the ACL.) This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier. /BACKUP Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /BACKUP qualifier selects files according to the dates of their most recent backups. This qualifier is incompatible with the /CREATED, /EXPIRED, and /MODIFIED qualifiers, which also allow you to select files according to time attributes. If you specify none of these four time qualifiers, the default is the /CREATED qualifier. /BEFORE /BEFORE[=time] Selects only those files dated prior to the specified time. You can specify time as absolute time, as a combination of absolute and delta times, or as one of the following keywords: TODAY (default), TOMORROW, or YESTERDAY. Specify one of the following qualifiers with the /BEFORE qualifier to indicate the time attribute to be used as the basis for selection: /BACKUP, /CREATED (default), /EXPIRED, or /MODIFIED. For complete information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier and can be used only with an object that is a file. /BY_OWNER /BY_OWNER[=uic] Selects only those files whose owner user identification code (UIC) matches the specified owner UIC. The default UIC is that of the current process. Specify the UIC by using standard UIC format as described in the Security Guide. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier and can be used only with an object that is a file. /CONFIRM /CONFIRM /NOCONFIRM (default) Controls whether a request is issued before the ACL of an object is modified to confirm that the operation should be performed on that object. The following responses are valid: YES NO QUIT TRUE FALSE Ctrl/Z 1 0 ALL <Return> You can use any combination of uppercase and lowercase letters for word responses. Word responses can be abbreviated to one or more letters (for example, T, TR, or TRU for TRUE), but these abbreviations must be unique. Affirmative answers are YES, TRUE, and 1. Negative answers include: NO, FALSE, 0, and pressing the Return key. Entering QUIT or pressing Ctrl/Z indicates that you want to stop processing the command at that point. When you respond by entering ALL, the command continues to process, but no further prompts are given. If you type a response other than one of those in the list, DCL issues an error message and redisplays the prompt. /CREATED Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /CREATED qualifier selects files based on their dates of creation. This qualifier is incompatible with the /BACKUP, /EXPIRED, and /MODIFIED qualifiers, which also allow you to select files according to time attributes. If you specify none of these four time qualifiers, the default is the /CREATED qualifier. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier. /DEFAULT Creates an ACL for the specified files as if the files were newly created. For a directory file, the /DEFAULT qualifier propagates the entire ACL (except ACEs with the Nopropagate option) so that a particular access protection can be propagated throughout a directory tree. For all other files, the /DEFAULT qualifier propagates the Default option ACEs in the ACL of the parent directory to the ACL of the specified files. SET ACL/DEFAULT does not overwrite protected ACEs on the target object. It does copy ACEs with the Hidden option. The /DEFAULT qualifier uses the ACL of the parent directory of the specified file, not the current default directory. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier and can be used only with an object that is a file. /DELETE /DELETE[=ALL] Indicates that the access control entries (ACEs) specified with the /ACL qualifier are to be deleted. If no ACEs are specified with the /ACL qualifier, the entire access control list (ACL) is deleted (except ACEs with the Protected option). If you specify an ACE that was not specified with the /ACL qualifier, you are notified that the ACE does not exist, and the delete operation continues. If no ACEs are specified with the /ACL qualifier, the qualifier /DELETE=ALL deletes all ACEs, including those with the Protected option. /EDIT Invokes the ACL editor and allows you to use the /JOURNAL, the /MODE, or the /RECOVER qualifier. Any other qualifiers specified with /EDIT are ignored. For more information on the ACL editor, see the OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual. /EXCLUDE /EXCLUDE=(filespec[,...]) Excludes the specified files from the SET ACL operation. You can include a directory but not a device in the file specification. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. However, you cannot use relative version numbers to exclude a specific version. If you specify only one file, you can omit the parentheses. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier and can be used only with an object that is a file. /EXPIRED Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /EXPIRED qualifier selects files according to their expiration dates. (The expiration date is set with the SET FILE/EXPIRATION_DATE command.) The /EXPIRED qualifier is incompatible with the /BACKUP, /CREATED, and /MODIFIED qualifiers, which also allow you to select files according to time attributes. If you specify none of these four time qualifiers, the default is the /CREATED qualifier. /JOURNAL /JOURNAL[=filespec] /NOJOURNAL Controls whether a journal is created from the editing session. By default, a journal is created if the editing session ends abnormally. If you omit the file specification, the journal has the same name as the input file and a file type of JOU. You can use the /JOURNAL qualifier to specify a journal name that is different from the default. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are not allowed in the /JOURNAL filespec parameter. You must specify the /EDIT qualifier in order to use this qualifier. /LIKE /LIKE=([OBJECT_TYPE=type,]OBJECT_NAME=name) Deletes the ACL of the specified object and replaces it with the ACL of the object specified with the /LIKE qualifier. Any existing ACEs (except those with the Protected option) are deleted before the ACL specified by the /LIKE qualifier is copied. ACEs with the Nopropagate option are not copied but ACEs with the Hidden option are copied. You can specify the following keywords for OBJECT_TYPE: DEVICE CAPABILITY (VAX only) FILE GROUP_GLOBAL_SECTION LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE QUEUE SYSTEM_GLOBAL_SECTION The object-name parameter is specified as it is specified for the command. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are not allowed in the /LIKE qualifier parameters. If the object type is FILE, only the OBJECT_NAME parameter is required. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Controls whether the SET ACL command displays the object name of the object that has been affected by the command. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier. /MODE /MODE=[NO]PROMPT Determines whether the ACL editor prompts for field values. By default, the ACL editor selects prompt mode. You must specify the /EDIT qualifier to use this qualifier. /MODIFIED Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /MODIFIED qualifier selects files according to the dates on which they were last modified. This qualifier is incompatible with the /BACKUP, /CREATED, and /EXPIRED qualifiers, which also allow you to select files according to time attributes. If you specify none of these four time modifiers, the default is the /CREATED qualifier. /NEW Indicates that any existing ACE in the ACL of the object specified with SET ACL (including those with the Protected option) is to be deleted. To use the /NEW qualifier, you must specify a new ACL or ACE with the /ACL, the /LIKE, or the /REPLACE qualifier. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier. /OBJECT_TYPE /OBJECT_TYPE=type Specifies the type of the object whose ACL is being edited. By default, the ACL editor assumes that the object whose ACL is being edited is a file. The following keywords are used to specify the object type: CAPABILITY (VAX only) On VAX, the object is a system capability, such as the ability to process vector instructions. Currently, the only defined object name for the CAPABILITY type is VECTOR, which governs the ability of a subject to access a vector processor on the system. Note that you must supply the capability name (for example, VECTOR) as the object-name parameter in the SET ACL command. Manipulating the ACL on a capability requires system privilege. DEVICE The object is a device. FILE (default) The object is a Files-11 disk file (includes directory files). GROUP_GLOBAL_SECTION The object is a group global section. LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE The object is a shareable logical name table. QUEUE The object is a batch or device (terminal, server, or printer) queue. SYSTEM_GLOBAL_SECTION The object is a system global section. /RECOVER /RECOVER[=filespec] /NORECOVER (default) Specifies the name of the journal to be used in a recovery operation. If the file specification is omitted with the /RECOVER qualifier, the journal is assumed to have the same name as the input file and a file type of JOU. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are not allowed with the /RECOVER qualifier filespec parameter. You must specify /EDIT in order to use this qualifier. /REPLACE /REPLACE=(ace[,...]) Deletes the access control entries (ACEs) specified with the /ACL qualifier and replaces them with those specified with the /REPLACE qualifier. Any ACEs specified with the /ACL qualifier must exist and must be specified in the order in which they appear in the ACL. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier. /SINCE /SINCE[=time] Selects only those files dated after the specified time. You can specify time as absolute time, as a combination of absolute and delta times, or as one of the following keywords: TODAY (default), TOMORROW, or YESTERDAY. Specify one of the following qualifiers with the /SINCE qualifier to indicate the time attribute to be used as the basis for selection: /BACKUP, /CREATED (default), /EXPIRED, or /MODIFIED. For complete information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. This qualifier cannot be used with the /EDIT qualifier and can be used only with an object that is a file. 3 Examples 1.$ SET QUEUE/PROTECTION=WORLD LN03_PRINT $ SET ACL/OBJECT_TYPE=QUEUE - _$ L/ACL=(IDENTIFIER=SECRETARIES,ACCESS=WRITE) - _$ LN03_PRINT This example shows how you can use ACLs to limit access to specific queues on the system. (By default, all users can submit jobs to any queues on the system.) The first command in the example removes world write (W) access to the LN03_PRINT print queue, prohibiting all users from submitting jobs to the queue. The second command adds an ACL to the queue allowing write (W) access only to users who hold the SECRETARIES identifier. 2.$ SET ACL/LIKE=(OBJECT_NAME=USER.LIS) ACCOUNTS.LIS This example replaces the ACL of the file ACCOUNTS.LIS with the ACL for the file USER.LIS. Since the object is a file, the OBJECT_TYPE keyword is assumed by default. 2 AUDIT Provides the management interface to the security auditing system. Requires the SECURITY privilege. Format SET AUDIT/qualifier There are five categories of qualifiers, grouped by task, for the SET AUDIT command: Task Qualifiers Requirements Define /AUDIT, Specify whether you are defining auditing /ALARM, alarms (/ALARM), audits (/AUDIT), events /CLASS, or both. Also specify whether you /ENABLE, are enabling (/ENABLE) or disabling /DISABLE (/DISABLE) the reporting of the event. Define /DESTINATION, Requires both the /DESTINATION and auditing /JOURNAL, /JOURNAL qualifiers. log file /VERIFY Define /INTERVAL, None. operational /LISTENER, character- /SERVER, istics of /VERIFY the audit server and a listener mailbox (if any) Define /ARCHIVE, None. secondary /DESTINATION, log file /VERIFY Define /BACKLOG, With the /RESOURCE or /THRESHOLD resource /EXCLUDE, qualifier, include the /JOURNAL monitoring /JOURNAL, qualifier. defaults /RESOURCE, /THRESHOLD, /VERIFY 3 Qualifiers /ALARM Makes the command apply to alarms, which are messages displayed on an operator terminal. See the description of the DCL command REPLY/ENABLE for details on how to enable terminals to display security messages. /ARCHIVE /ARCHIVE=[keyword,...] Specifies which classes of audit event messages are written to the security archive file. Specify one or more of the following keywords: Keyword Description NONE Disables archiving on the system. [NO]ALL (default) Enables or disables archiving of all system security events. By default, no events are archived. SYSTEM_ALARM Enables archiving of all security alarm events. SYSTEM_AUDIT Enables archiving of all security audit events. Archiving should be run on only one node in an OpenVMS Cluster with its own audit server database because multiple nodes will try to open the audit file exclusively. /AUDIT Makes the command apply to audits, which are messages recorded in the system security audit log file. /BACKLOG /BACKLOG=[keyword[,...]] Specifies the thresholds for suspending a process that has exceeded the process message limit. The thresholds include the total number of messages in memory and the number belonging to the particular process. To prevent a process from being suspended, use the /EXCLUDE qualifier. Specify the following keywords: Keyword Description TOTAL=(n1,n2,n3) Thresholds at which flow control is initiated and accelerated; see description below. PROCESS=(p1,p2) Thresholds at which process submissions are controlled. Total Process Messages Default Messages Default Action Taken N1 100 P1 5 When there are 100 messages in memory, the audit server suspends any process that has submitted 5 or more messages until all messages are written to disk. N2 200 P2 2 When there are 200 messages in memory, the audit server suspends any process that has submitted 2 or more messages until all messages are written to disk. N3 300 Any process with messages in memory is suspended until all messages are written to disk. /CLASS /CLASS=class Specifies the class of the object whose auditing attributes are to be modified. If /CLASS is not specified, the command assumes the class is FILE. Specify one of the following keywords with the /CLASS qualifier: CAPABILITY COMMON_EVENT_CLUSTER DEVICE FILE GROUP_GLOBAL_SECTION LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE QUEUE RESOURCE_DOMAIN SECURITY_CLASS SYSTEM_GLOBAL_SECTION VOLUME /DESTINATION /DESTINATION=filespec When changing the destination of event messages, specifies the new location of the system security audit log file. The device, if part of the file specification, must be a disk. The /DESTINATION qualifier requires the /JOURNAL qualifier in this case. Once you have relocated the log file, execute the command SET AUDIT/SERVER=NEW_LOG to let all the nodes in the cluster know of the new location. The previous audit log file is closed and all subsequent audit event messages generated throughout the cluster are sent to the new audit log file. When used with /ARCHIVE, specifies the name of the archive log file. Events can be archived to a local or remote file on any file-structured disk device. For example, you can use an archive file to redirect event messages from a satellite to a larger node in the cluster. /DISABLE /DISABLE=(keyword[,...]) Disables alarms or audits for the specified events. To disable all system events and file access events, specify the keyword ALL. You must specify at least one of the keywords. For a list of the keywords to use with the /DISABLE qualifier, see the /ENABLE qualifier description. You must also specify either the /ALARM or /AUDIT qualifier, or both, when you use the /DISABLE qualifier. In processing the SET AUDIT command, the system processes the /DISABLE qualifier last. If you specify both the /ENABLE and /DISABLE qualifiers in the same command line, the /DISABLE qualifier prevails. /ENABLE /ENABLE=(keyword[,...]) Enables alarms or audits for the specified events. To enable all system events and file access events, specify the keyword ALL. You must specify at least one keyword. You must also specify either the /ALARM or /AUDIT qualifier, or both, when you use the /ENABLE qualifier. The keywords that you can specify with either the /ENABLE or the /DISABLE qualifier are as follows: Keyword Description ACCESS=(condition Specifies access events for all objects in [:access[,...]] a class. (To audit a single object, use an [,...]) auditing ACE and enable the access control list (ACL) category.) Digital recommends that when you enable auditing conditionally, you enable it for all possible forms of access since the system can check access rights at several points during an operation. (For example, a FAILURE might occur on a read or write access check.) Condition Description Keyword ALL All object access BYPASS Successful object access due to the use of the BYPASS privilege FAILURE Unsuccessful object access GRPPRV Successful object access due to the use of the group privilege (GRPPRV) READALL Successful object access due to the use of the READALL privilege SUCCESS Successful object access SYSPRV Successful object access due to the use of the system privilege (SYSPRV) Access Description Keyword ALL All types of access ASSOCIATE Associate access CONTROL Control access to examine or change security characteristics CREATE Create access DELETE Delete access EXECUTE Execute access LOCK Lock access LOGICAL Logical I/O access MANAGE Manage access PHYSICAL Physical I/O access READ Read access SUBMIT Submit access WRITE Write access ACL Specifies an event requested by an audit or alarm ACE in the access control list (ACL) of an object. To audit all objects of a class, use the ACCESS keyword. ALL Specifies all system events and file access events. It does not enable access events for object classes other than FILE. AUDIT=keyword Specifies events within the auditing subsystem. Only one keyword is currently defined. Keyword Description ILLFORMED Specifies illformed events from internal calls (identified by NSA$M_INTERNAL) to $AUDIT_ EVENT, $CHECK_PRIVILEGE, $CHKPRO, or $CHECK_ACCESS system services. An illformed event is caused by an incomplete or syntactically incorrect argument being supplied to one of these system services by a piece of privileged code. AUTHORIZATION Specifies the modification of any portion of the system user authorization file (SYSUAF), network proxy authorization file (NETPROXY), or the rights list (RIGHTLIST) (including password changes made through the AUTHORIZE, SET PASSWORD, or LOGINOUT commands or the $SETUAI system service). BREAKIN=(keyword[,.Specifies the occurrence of one or more classes of break-in attempts, as specified by one or more of the following keywords: ALL DETACHED DIALUP LOCAL NETWORK REMOTE CONNECTION Specifies a logical link connection or termination through DECnet Phase IV, DECwindows, $IPC, or SYSMAN. CREATE Specifies the creation of an object. Requires the /CLASS qualifier if it is not a file. DEACCESS Specifies deaccess from an object. Requires the /CLASS qualifier if it is not a file. DELETE Specifies the deletion of an object. Requires the /CLASS=DEVICE qualifier. FILE_ACCESS= This keyword is obsolete and is superseded (keyword[,...]) by the ACCESS keyword, which is valid on all OpenVMS Version 6.1 or higher systems. On Alpha, this keyword specifies the occurrence of file and global section access events (regardless of the value given in the object's access control list [ACL], if any). IDENTIFIER Specifies that the use of identifiers as privileges should be audited. For further information, see the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. INSTALL Specifies modifications made to the known file list through the INSTALL utility. LOGFAILURE= Specifies the occurrence of one or more (keyword[,...]) classes of login failures, as specified by the following keywords: ALL All possible types of login failures BATCH Batch process login failure DETACHED Detached process login failure DIALUP Dialup interactive login failure LOCAL Local interactive login failure NETWORK Network server task login failure REMOTE Interactive login failure from another network node, for example, with a SET HOST command SUBPROCESS Subprocess login failure LOGIN= Specifies the occurrence of one or more (keyword[,...]) classes of login attempts, as specified by the following keywords. See the LOGFAILURE keyword for further description. ALL BATCH DETACHED DIALUP LOCAL NETWORK REMOTE SUBPROCESS LOGOUT= Specifies the occurrence of one or more (keyword[,...]) classes of logouts, as specified by the following keywords. See the LOGFAILURE keyword for further description. ALL BATCH DETACHED DIALUP LOCAL NETWORK REMOTE SUBPROCESS MOUNT Specifies a mount or dismount operation. NCP Specifies access to the network configuration database, using the network control program (NCP). PRIVILEGE= Specifies successful or unsuccessful use (keyword[,...]) of privilege, as specified by the following keywords: FAILURE [:privilege(,...)] - Unsuccessful use of privilege SUCCESS [:privilege(,...)] - Successful use of privilege For a listing of privileges, see online help for the DCL command SET PROCESS/PRIVILEGES. PROCESS= Specifies the use of one or more of the (keyword[,...]) process control system services, as specified by the following keywords: ALL Use of any of the process control system services CREPRC All use of $CREPRC DELPRC All use of $DELPRC SCHDWK Privileged use of $SCHDWK CANWAK Privileged use of $CANWAK WAKE Privileged use of $WAKE SUSPND Privileged use of $SUSPND RESUME Privileged use of $RESUME GRANTID Privileged use of $GRANTID REVOKID Privileged use of $REVOKID GETJPI Privileged use of $GETJPI FORCEX Privileged use of $FORCEX SETPRI Privileged use of $SETPRI Privileged use of a process control system service means the caller used GROUP or WORLD privilege to affect the target process. SYSGEN Specifies the modification of a system parameter with the OpenVMS System Generation utility. TIME Specifies the modification of system time. /EXCLUDE /EXCLUDE=process-id /NOEXCLUDE=process-id Adds a process identification (PID) to the audit server's process exclusion list. The process exclusion list contains those processes that will not be suspended by the audit server if a resource exhaustion reaches the action threshold. By default, realtime processes and all of the following processes are included in the process exclusion list and are never suspended: CACHE_SERVER CLUSTER_SERVER CONFIGURE DFS$COM_ACP DNS$ADVER IPCACP JOB_CONTROL NETACP NET$ACP OPCOM REMACP SHADOW_SERVER SMISERVER SWAPPER TP_SERVER VWS$DISPLAYMGR VWS$EMULATORS Use the SET AUDIT/NOEXCLUDE command to remove a process from the process exclusion list; however, processes listed above cannot be removed from the exclusion list. Also note that PIDs are not automatically removed from the process exclusion list when processes log out of the system. /FAILURE_MODE /FAILURE_MODE[=keyword] This qualifier is obsolete. On Alpha, specifies how the OpenVMS system proceeds following a failed attempt to write a security alarm to the operator communication process's (OPCOM's) mailbox. Specify one of the following keywords with the /FAILURE_MODE qualifier: Option Description CRASH Forces a system failure if security alarms cannot be written. IGNORE Indicates that failing security alarms are to be ignored. The first failed alarm causes an error message to be written to the operator console and log file. The system maintains a count of the lost alarms, which can be displayed with the SHOW AUDIT command. WAIT Indicates that processes are placed in the MWAIT state to wait until the resource is available. This is the default. The /ALARM qualifier is required when specifying an audit failure mode. /INTERVAL /INTERVAL=(keyword[,...]) Specifies the delta times to be used for regular audit server operations. For information about specifying delta times, see the OpenVMS User's Manual. The following table describes keywords for the /INTERVAL qualifier. Keyword Description ARCHIVE_ Specifies the interval at which data collected FLUSH=time by the audit server is written to the archive file. The default is 1 minute. JOURNAL_ Specifies the interval at which data collected FLUSH=time by the audit server is written to the audit log file. The default is 5 minutes. RESOURCE_ Specifies the interval at which the audit server MONITOR=time retries log file allocation or access. This interval applies whenever free space in the log file is below either the warning or action thresholds, or when the volume holding the log file is inaccessible. The default interval is 5 minutes. RESUME_ Specifies the interval at which the audit SCAN=time server reviews an existing resource exhaustion condition. The default is 15 minutes. /JOURNAL /JOURNAL[=journal-name] Specifies the name of the audit journal; the name defaults to SECURITY. (Currently, there is only one journal.) The /JOURNAL qualifier is required when redefining the audit log file or when specifying resource monitoring characteristics with the /RESOURCE or the /THRESHOLD qualifier. /LISTENER /LISTENER=device /NOLISTENER Specifies the name of a mailbox device to which the audit server sends a binary copy of all security audit event messages. Users can create such a mailbox to process system security events as they occur. For a description of the message formats written to the listener mailbox, see the Audit Analysis Utility documentation in the OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual. Use the SET AUDIT/NOLISTENER command to disable a listener device. /RESOURCE /RESOURCE=keyword[,...] Enables or disables the monitoring of disk volumes to ensure adequate space for audit journal entries; it also specifies the monitoring method to use. The /JOURNAL qualifier is required. For more information about resource monitoring, see the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. Keyword Description DISABLE Disables monitoring on the disk volume containing the audit journal. ENABLE Enables resource monitoring on the disk volume containing the audit journal. MONITOR_ This keyword is obsolete. MODE=mode Specifies the method the audit server uses to monitor available resources. Specify one of the following keywords: COUNT Controls whether resource monitoring is based on the amount of free disk space required to store a fixed number of event messages. PERCENTAGE Controls whether resource monitoring is based on the percentage of the disk volume or volume set available. SPACE Controls whether resource monitoring is based on the number of free blocks on the disk. The is the default method used for resource monitoring. TIME Controls whether resource monitoring is based on the amount of free disk space needed to store events which occur over a fixed period of time (in seconds). /SERVER /SERVER=keyword[,...] Modifies audit server characteristics. The following table describes keywords for the /SERVER qualifier: Keyword Description CREATE_SYSTEM_LOG This keyword is obsolete. On Alpha, causes the audit server to create a new local system security audit log file. Other audit servers in the cluster are not affected. This keyword may be used by sites operating a multienvironment cluster where it may be necessary to create a new log file on a specific node in the cluster. CREATE_ SYSTEM_LOG is synonymous with NEW_LOG for nonclustered systems. EXIT Initiates an audit server shutdown. This is the only method for removing the audit server process from the system; the audit server cannot be deleted or suspended. FINAL_ Specifies the action the audit server should ACTION=action take when it runs out of memory and cannot buffer messages. (For more information, see the discussion of message flow control in the OpenVMS Guide to System Security.) Specify one of the following actions: CRASH - Crash the system if the audit server runs out of memory. IGNORE_NEW - Ignore new event messages until memory is available. New event messages are lost but event messages in memory are saved. PURGE_OLD (default) - Remove old event messages until memory is available for the most current messages. FLUSH Copies all buffered audit and archive records to the security audit log file and security archive file, respectively. INITIATE Enables auditing during system startup. Ordinarily, auditing is started from VMS$LPBEGIN in STARTUP.COM but, if a site redefines the logical name SYS$AUDIT_SERVER_ INHIBIT, the OpenVMS system waits for a SET AUDIT/SERVER=INITIATE command before enabling auditing. NEW_LOG Creates a new clusterwide audit log file. Typically, this is used daily to generate a new version of the audit log file. REDIRECT_SYSTEM_ This keyword is obsolete. LOG On Alpha, causes the audit server on the local node to redirect security event messages to a new audit log file, whose location was defined previously by the /DESTINATION qualifier. Audit server processes (and log files) on other nodes in the cluster are unaffected. RESUME Requests the audit server process to resume normal activity on the system, if adequate disk space is available. Normally, once the resource monitoring action threshold has been reached, the audit server process suspends most system activity and waits 15 minutes before attempting to resume normal system activity. START Starts the Audit Server process on the system. In order to fully enable the auditing subsystem, the SET AUDIT/SERVER=INITIATE command must be used after the SET AUDIT /SERVER=START command has completed. Digital recommends using the following command procedure to start the Audit Server: SYS$SYSTEM:STARTUP AUDIT_SERVER /THRESHOLD /THRESHOLD=type=value Specifies threshold values used in monitoring available space in the audit log file. The auditing system issues advisory messages to central and security operators whenever free space in the audit log file falls below the WARNING threshold. The auditing system suspends processes which generate audit events when free disk space is below the action threshold. (See /RESOURCE=[enable|disable]). The /JOURNAL qualifier is required. The following table lists the types of thresholds: Keyword Description WARNING=value Specifies the threshold at which the audit server notifies all security operator terminals that resources are getting low. ACTION=value Specifies the threshold at which the audit server starts suspending processes that are generating audit records. (Certain processes are immune to this: see OpenVMS Guide to System Security). RESUME=value This keyword is obsolete. Specifies the threshold at which the audit server resumes normal system activity. The following table lists the default warning and action values for each monitoring mode. Mode Warning Action Blocks 100 25 Delta time 2 0:00:00 0 0:30:00 /VERIFY Do not return the dollar sign ($) prompt until the audit server completes the command. Associated qualifiers determine which of the following actions occur: o Redefinition of auditing events o Redefinition of the audit log file or the archive file o Modification of the audit server's operational characteristics o Modification of resource monitoring attributes If you do not want to wait for the command to complete, specify /NOVERIFY. 3 Examples 1.$ SET AUDIT/AUDIT/ENABLE= - _$ (CREATE,ACCESS=(SYSPRV,BYPASS),DEACCESS)/CLASS=FILE $ SHOW AUDIT/AUDIT System security audits currently enabled for: . . . FILE access: Failure: read,write,execute,delete,control SYSPRV: read,write,execute,delete,control BYPASS: read,write,execute,delete,control Other: create,deaccess The SET AUDIT command in this example enables auditing of file creation and file deaccess; it also enables auditing for any file access done by using either SYSPRV or BYPASS privilege. 2.$ SET AUDIT/JOURNAL=SECURITY/DESTINATION=AUDIT$:[AUDIT]TURIN $ SET AUDIT/SERVER=NEW $ SHOW AUDIT/JOURNAL List of audit journals: Journal name: SECURITY Journal owner: (system audit journal) Destination: AUDIT$:[AUDIT]TURIN.AUDIT$JOURNAL The SET AUDIT command in this example demonstrates how to switch to a new journal. 3.$ SET AUDIT/SERVER=FINAL=CRASH $ SHOW AUDIT/SERVER Security auditing server characteristics: Database version: 4.4 Backlog (total): 100, 200, 300 Backlog (process): 5, 2 Server processing intervals: Archive flush: 0 00:01:00.00 Journal flush: 0 00:05:00.00 Resource scan: 0 00:05:00.00 Final resource action: crash system The SET AUDIT command in this example changes the audit server's final action setting so the system crashes when the audit server runs out of memory. 4.$ SET AUDIT/ARCHIVE/DESTINATION=SYS$SPECIFIC:[SYSMGR]TURIN-ARCHIVE $ SHOW AUDIT/ARCHIVE Security archiving information: Archiving events: system audits Archive destination: SYS$SPECIFIC:[SYSMGR]TURIN-ARCHIVE.AUDIT$JOURNAL The SET AUDIT command in this example enables a node-specific archive file. 5.$ SET AUDIT/JOURNAL/RESOURCE=ENABLE $ SHOW AUDIT/JOURNAL List of audit journals: Journal name: SECURITY Journal owner: (system audit journal) Destination: SYS$COMMON:[SYSMGR]SECURITY.AUDIT$JOURNAL Monitoring: enabled Warning thresholds, Block count: 100 Duration: 2 00:00:00.0 Action thresholds, Block count: 25 Duration: 0 00:30:00.0 The SET AUDIT command in this example enables disk monitoring and switches the mode so the disk space is monitored in terms of time rather than free blocks. 2 BROADCAST Enables you to selectively screen out various kinds of messages from being broadcast to your terminal. Format SET BROADCAST=(class-name[,...]) 3 Parameter class-name[,...] Specifies the class of message that you want to enable or disable for broadcast to your terminal. If you specify only one class, you can omit the parentheses. The class names are as follows: ALL Enables all message classes. [NO]DCL Specifies Ctrl/T and SPAWN/NOTIFY messages. [NO]GENERAL Specifies all normal REPLY messages or messages from $BRDCST. [NO]MAIL Specifies notification of mail. NONE Disables all message classes. [NO]OPCOM Specifies messages issued by the operator communication process (OPCOM). [NO]PHONE Specifies messages from the Phone utility. [NO]QUEUE Specifies messages referring to print or batch jobs issued by the queue manager. [NO]SHUTDOWN Specifies messages issued from the REPLY /SHUTDOWN command. [NO]URGENT Specifies messages issued from the REPLY /URGENT command. [NO]USER1 to Specifies messages from specific user [NO]USER16 groups. (For information on setting up user-written broadcast messages, see the description of the $BRKTHRU system service in the OpenVMS System Services Reference Manual.) 3 Examples 1.$ SET BROADCAST=(NOMAIL, NOPHONE) . . . $ SET BROADCAST=MAIL In this example, the first SET BROADCAST command screens out all mail and phone messages. Later the second SET BROADCAST command restores mail messages. Phone messages are still screened. 2.$ SET BROADCAST=NONE . . . $ SET BROADCAST=(SHUTDOWN, URGENT, DCL, OPCOM) In this example, the first SET BROADCAST command screens out all messages. Later the second SET BROADCAST command restores shutdown, urgent, DCL, and OPCOM messages. General, phone, mail, queue, and user messages are still screened. 2 CARD_READER Defines the default translation mode for cards read from a card reader. All subsequent input read from the specified card reader is converted using the specified mode. Format SET CARD_READER device-name[:] 3 Parameter device-name[:] Specifies the name of the card reader for which the translation mode is to be set. The device must not be currently allocated to any other user. 3 Qualifiers /026 Sets the card reader for cards punched on an 026 punch. /029 Sets the card reader for cards punched on an 029 punch. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Controls whether log information is displayed at the terminal to confirm that the card reader is set. 3 Example $ ALLOCATE CR: _CRA0: ALLOCATED $ SET CARD_READER CRA0:/029 $ COPY CRA0: [MALCOLM.DATAFILES]CARDS.DAT The ALLOCATE command requests the allocation of a card reader by specifying the generic device name. When the ALLOCATE command displays the name of the device, the SET CARD_READER command sets the translation mode at 029. Then the COPY command copies all the cards read by the card reader CRA0 into the file CARDS.DAT in the directory [MALCOLM.DATAFILES]. 2 CLUSTER 3 /EXPECTED_VOTES Sets the total expected votes in the OpenVMS Cluster to a value that you specify or, if no value is specified, sets the total votes to a value determined by the system. Requires OPER (operator) privilege. Format SET CLUSTER/EXPECTED_VOTES[=value] 4 Parameter value Specifies the total number of expected votes in the cluster. 4 Description The SET CLUSTER/EXPECTED_VOTES command enables you to adjust the total number of expected votes in the cluster. Set this value equal to the number of votes contributed by each node plus the number of votes contributed by the cluster quorum disk. The system will automatically calculate the value of the cluster quorum from the total number of expected votes in the cluster. You can specify the expected total votes value as part of the SET CLUSTER/EXPECTED_VOTES command string. If you enter the command without specifying a value for expected votes, the system calculates the value for you, using the following formula: EXPECTED_VOTES=(NODE1_VOTES+NODE2_VOTES+...)+QUORUM_DISK_VOTES NODEn_VOTES is the value of the system parameter VOTES for each node in the cluster and QUORUM_DISK_VOTES is the value of the system parameter QDSKVOTES. When you enter the SET CLUSTER/EXPECTED_VOTES command without specifying a value, the system assumes that all nodes that are expected to be in the cluster are currently members. In general, you use the SET CLUSTER/EXPECTED_VOTES command only when a node is leaving the cluster for an extended period of time. Under normal circumstances, quorum is not reduced when a node leaves the cluster, because it is assumed that the node may be rebooted and rejoin the cluster. If a node is removed and is unable to rejoin the cluster within a reasonable period of time (for example, if a node crashes due to a hardware problem and cannot rejoin the cluster for several days), the quorum for the cluster can safely be reduced by lowering the total expected votes until that node rejoins. The purpose of a cluster quorum is to eliminate any possibility of the cluster partitioning into separate clusters and simultaneously accessing the same resources (such as disks). If the sum of the votes for all members of the cluster is smaller than the cluster quorum, all nodes will block activity until new nodes join to increase the vote total. Lowering the quorum value (by reducing the value of the total expected votes) when one or more nodes leave the cluster for long periods of time reduces this possibility. Note that no matter what value you specify for the SET CLUSTER /EXPECTED_VOTES command, you cannot increase quorum to a value that is greater than the number of the votes present, nor can you reduce quorum to a value that is half or fewer of the votes present. When you enter the SET CLUSTER/EXPECTED_VOTES command, either with or without an expected votes value specified, the system responds with a message indicating the new value that was actually set. Note that you need to enter this command only on one node in the cluster, because the new value for total expected votes is propagated through the cluster. This new expected votes value should then be stored in the system parameter EXPECTED_ VOTES on each node, so that it remains in effect after the nodes reboot. When a node that was previously a member of the cluster is ready to rejoin, you should increase the system parameter EXPECTED_ VOTES to its original value before bringing the node back to the cluster. Note that you do not need to use the SET CLUSTER /EXPECTED_VOTES command to increase the number of expected votes, because the expected votes value will be increased automatically when the node rejoins the cluster. 4 Examples 1.$ SET CLUSTER/EXPECTED_VOTES The SET CLUSTER command in this example instructs the system to calculate the total expected votes value for you, because no value is specified as part of the command string. The system uses the NODEn_VOTES + QUORUM_DISK_VOTES formula. 2.$ SET CLUSTER/EXPECTED_VOTES=9 The SET CLUSTER command in this example sets the total expected votes to 9, which is the value specified in the command string. 2 COMMAND Invokes the Command Definition utility, which adds commands to your process command table or to a specified command table file. For a complete description of the Command Definition utility, see the OpenVMS Command Definition, Librarian, and Message Utilities Manual. Format SET COMMAND [filespec[,...]] 3 Parameters [filespec[,...]] Specifies the name of one or more command definition files. If you specify more than one name, separate them with commas. The default file type is .CLD. See the OpenVMS Command Definition, Librarian, and Message Utilities Manual for more information about writing a command definition file. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. 3 Qualifiers /DELETE /DELETE=(verb[,...]) Specifies /DELETE mode to delete verbs from the command table you are modifying. You can use the /DELETE qualifier to delete a verb in either your process command table or in a command table file specified with the /TABLE qualifier. If you do not use the /TABLE qualifier to specify an alternate command table, the default is to delete verbs from your process command table. If you do not use the /OUTPUT qualifier to specify an output file, the default is to return the modified command table to your process. The verb specifies a verb to be deleted. If you specify two or more verbs, separate them with commas and enclose the list in parentheses. If you specify only one verb, you can omit the parentheses. You cannot use the /LISTING, /OBJECT, or /REPLACE qualifiers in /DELETE mode. /LISTING /LISTING[=filespec] /NOLISTING Controls whether an output listing is created and optionally provides an output file specification for the listing file. A listing file contains a listing of the command definitions along with any error messages. The listing file is similar to a compiler listing. If you specify the /LISTING qualifier and omit the file specification, output is written to the default device and directory; the listing file will have the same name as the first command definition file and a file type of LIS. You can use the /LISTING qualifier only in /OBJECT or /REPLACE mode; you cannot create a listing in /DELETE mode. In /OBJECT and /REPLACE modes, the default is /NOLISTING. /OBJECT /OBJECT[=filespec] Specifies /OBJECT mode to create an object module from a command definition file and optionally provides an object file specification. You cannot use the /OBJECT qualifier to create an object module from a command definition that contains the IMAGE keyword. You can specify only one command definition file when you use SET COMMAND/OBJECT. If you specify the /OBJECT qualifier and omit the file specification, output is written to the default device and directory; the object file will have the same name as the input file and a file type .OBJ. You cannot use the /DELETE, /OUTPUT, /REPLACE, or /TABLE qualifiers in /OBJECT mode. /OUTPUT /OUTPUT[=filespec] /NOOUTPUT Controls where the modified command table should be placed. If you provide an output file specification, the modified command table is written to the specified file. If you do not provide an output file specification, the edited command table replaces your process table. The /NOOUTPUT qualifier indicates that no output is to be generated. You can specify an output file specification with the /OUTPUT qualifier only when you also use the /TABLE=filespec qualifier to provide the input tables. The default file type is .EXE. You can use the /OUTPUT qualifier only in /DELETE or /REPLACE mode; you cannot use the /OUTPUT qualifier in /OBJECT mode. In /DELETE and /REPLACE mode, the default is /OUTPUT with no file specification. /REPLACE Specifies /REPLACE mode to add or replace verbs in the command table you are modifying. You can use the /REPLACE qualifier to modify either the process command table or a command table file specified with the /TABLE qualifier. If you do not use the /TABLE qualifier to specify an alternate command table, the default is to modify your process command table. If you do not use the /OUTPUT qualifier to specify an output file, the default is to return the modified command table to your process. You cannot use the /OBJECT or /DELETE qualifiers in /REPLACE mode. If you do not explicitly specify /DELETE, /OBJECT, or /REPLACE mode the default is /REPLACE. /TABLE /TABLE=[filespec] Specifies the command table that is to be modified. If you specify the /TABLE qualifier and omit the file specification, the current process command table is modified. If you include a file specification, the specified command table is modified. The default file type is .EXE. If you use the /TABLE qualifier to provide an input command table file, you should also use the /OUTPUT qualifier to provide an output table file. Otherwise, the modified command table will be written to your process and will replace your process command table. You can only use the /TABLE qualifier in /DELETE or /REPLACE mode; you cannot use the /TABLE qualifier in /OBJECT mode. In /REPLACE and /DELETE mode, the default is /TABLE with no input file specification. 3 Examples 1.$ SET COMMAND SNAG This command adds the commands in SNAG.CLD to the command table in the current process. 2.$ SET COMMAND/OBJECT SNAG This command creates an object file using the commands in SNAG.CLD. This object file can then be linked with other object files to process application defined commands. 3.$ SET COMMAND/TABLE=MYTAB/OUTPUT=MYCLI SNAG This command adds the commands in SNAG.CLD to the command table MYTAB.EXE and writes the updated table to MYCLI.EXE. When you use the /TABLE qualifier to specify an input command table, you should use the /OUTPUT qualifier to specify an an output file. Otherwise, your process command table will be overwritten. 4.$ SET COMMAND/DELETE=HOLD This command deletes the definition for the verb HOLD from your process command table. The modified command table is returned to your process. 2 CONTROL Enables or disables the Ctrl/Y or the Ctrl/T function. Pressing Ctrl/Y interrupts a command and returns you to the DCL command level. Pressing Ctrl/T momentarily interrupts a command to print a line of statistics. SET CONTROL=T requires that SET TERMINAL/BROADCAST be set for the information to be displayed at your terminal. Format SET CONTROL [=(T,Y)] SET NOCONTROL [=(T,Y)] 3 Parameter (T,Y) Specifies that T (Ctrl/T) or Y (Ctrl/Y) be enabled or disabled. If you specify only one character, you can omit the parentheses. If you do not specify either T or Y, Y is the default. 3 Examples 1.$ SET NOCONTROL=Y The SET CONTROL command in this example disables the Ctrl/Y function as well as most Ctrl/C functions. 2.$ SET CONTROL=T The SET CONTROL command in this example enables the Ctrl/T function. 3.$ SET NOCONTROL=(T,Y) The SET CONTROL command in this example disables both the Ctrl/T and Ctrl/Y functions. 4.$ <Ctrl/T> NODE22::SMITH 16:21:04 (DCL) CPU=00:03:29.39 PF=14802 IO=18652 MEM=68 $ SET NOCONTROL=T $ <Ctrl/T> As shown in this example, when you press Ctrl/T, the system displays the appropriate information. The SET NOCONTROL=T command disables the Ctrl/T function. Now when you press Ctrl/T, no information is displayed. 2 CPU Changes the user capabilities associated with the specified CPUs. Requires ALTPRI and WORLD privileges. Format SET CPU cpu-id[, . . . ] 3 Parameter cpu-id Specifies a decimal value representing the identity of a processor in a OpenVMS multiprocessing system. On a VAX 6000 system or an Alpha 7000 system, the CPU is the backplane slot number of the processor. 3 Qualifiers /ALL Applies the specified operation to all CPUs in the active set. /CAPABILITY /CAPABILITY /NOCAPABILITY Allows bits in the process user capability mask to be set or cleared individually, in groups, or all at once. NOTE The SET CPU/[NO]CAPABILITY command will fail if there is an active process that requires a capability that is not available on any remaining active CPU. Specifying the /CAPABILITY qualifier has no direct effect, but merely indicates the target of the operations specified by the following secondary qualifiers: Sets all user capabilities defined by the position /SET=(n[,..values n, where n has the range of 1 to 16. Clears all user capabilities defined by the position /CLEAR=(n[,values n, where n has the range of 1 to 16. The secondary qualifiers can all be used at once as long as the user capability bits defined in the /SET and /CLEAR parameters do not overlap. The /NOCAPABILITY qualifier clears all user capability bits. /CLEAR /CLEAR=(n[,...]) Clears all user capabilities defined by the position values n specified by the /CAPABILITY qualifier. /GLOBAL Modifies the global cell SCH$GL_DEFAULT_CPU_CAP. This global cell is used to initialize the user capability mask of CPUs that are brought into the active set for the first time. /SET /SET=(n[,...]) Sets all user capabilities defined by the position values n specified by the /CAPABILITY qualifier. 3 Examples 1.$ SET CPU/CAPABILITY/GLOBAL/SET=(2,4) This command sets user capabilities 2 and 4 in the global cell SCH$GL_DEFAULT_CPU_CAP. 2.$ SET CPU/CAPABILITY/GLOBAL/SET=(2,4) 0 This command sets user capabilities 2 and 4 in the global cell SCH$GL_DEFAULT_CPU_CAP, as well in the active CPU 0. 3.$ SET CPU/CAPABILITY/SET=(1,2) 0 $ SHOW CPU/FULL PIPERI, a DEC 3000 Model 500 Multiprocessing is ENABLED. Full checking synchronization image loaded. Minimum multiprocessing revision levels: CPU = 1 System Page Size = 8192 System Revision Code = System Serial Number = Default CPU Capabilities: System: QUORUM RUN Default Process Capabilities: System: QUORUM RUN PRIMARY CPU = 00 CPU 00 is in RUN state Current Process: VMSADU PID = 00000094 Serial Number: Revision: F001 VAX floating point operations supported. IEEE floating point operations and data types supported. PALCODE: Revision Code = 5.48-01 PALcode Compatibility = 0 Maximum Shared Processors = 0 Memory Space: Physical address = 00000000 00054000 Length = 81920 Scratch Space: Physical address = 00000000 00104000 Length = 8192 Capabilities of this CPU: System: PRIMARY QUORUM RUN User bitmask: 00000003 Processes which can only execute on this CPU: NETACP PID = 0000008F Reason: PRIMARY Capability $ SET CPU/CAPABILITY/CLEAR=1 0 $ SHOW CPU/FULL PIPERI, a DEC 3000 Model 500 Multiprocessing is ENABLED. Full checking synchronization image loaded. Minimum multiprocessing revision levels: CPU = 1 System Page Size = 8192 System Revision Code = System Serial Number = Default CPU Capabilities: System: QUORUM RUN Default Process Capabilities: System: QUORUM RUN PRIMARY CPU = 00 CPU 00 is in RUN state Current Process: VMSADU PID = 00000094 Serial Number: Revision: F001 VAX floating point operations supported. IEEE floating point operations and data types supported. PALCODE: Revision Code = 5.48-01 PALcode Compatibility = 0 Maximum Shared Processors = 0 Memory Space: Physical address = 00000000 00054000 Length = 81920 Scratch Space: Physical address = 00000000 00104000 Length = 8192 Capabilities of this CPU: System: PRIMARY QUORUM RUN User bitmask: 00000002 Processes which can only execute on this CPU: NETACP PID = 0000008F Reason: PRIMARY Capability In this example, the first SET CPU command sets user capabilities 1 and 2 for CPU 0. The second SET CPU command clears capability 1. 2 DAY Sets the default day type specified in the user authorization file (UAF) for the current day. Requires OPER (operator) privilege. Format SET DAY 3 Qualifiers /DEFAULT /DEFAULT Overrides any previous SET DAY specification and specifies that the normal UAF defaults are to be used to determine today's day type. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Controls whether log information is displayed at the terminal to confirm that the new SET DAY information has been set. /PRIMARY /PRIMARY Sets today until midnight to a primary day. /SECONDARY /SECONDARY Sets today until midnight to a secondary day. 3 Examples 1.$ SET DAY/PRIMARY The SET DAY command in this example overrides the current default day type and sets today until midnight to a primary day. 2.$ SET DAY/DEFAULT The SET DAY command in this example overrides the previous SET DAY command and sets today's day type to the UAF-defined default. 2 DEFAULT Sets your default device and directory specifications. The new default is applied to all subsequent file specifications that do not explicitly include a device or directory name. When you change the default device assignment, the system equates the specified device with the logical name SYS$DISK. Format SET DEFAULT [device-name[:]][directory-spec] 3 Parameters device-name[:] Specifies the name of the device you want to go to. directory-spec Specifies the name of the directory you want to go to. A directory name must be enclosed in brackets ([ ]). Use the minus sign (-) to specify the next higher directory from the current default. You must specify either the device-name parameter or the directory-spec parameter. If you specify only the device name, the current directory is the default for the directory-spec parameter. If you specify only the directory name, the current device is the default for the device-name parameter. You can use a logical name but it must constitute at least the device part of the specification. When you use a search list logical name as the parameter, the logical name is not translated by the SET DEFAULT command. Instead, the SET DEFAULT command retains the logical name so that OpenVMS Record Management Services (RMS) is able to access the entire search list. If you enter the SHOW DEFAULT command, the search list logical name is displayed as the default device, along with its equivalence strings. 3 Examples 1.$ SET DEFAULT [CARPENTER] The SET DEFAULT command in this example changes the default directory to [CARPENTER]. The default disk device does not change. 2.$ SET DEFAULT $FLOPPY1:[WATER.MEMOS] The SET DEFAULT command in this example sets your default to the WATER.MEMOS subdirectory on $FLOPPY1. 3.$ SET DEFAULT $FLOPPY1: The SET DEFAULT command in this example sets the default device to $FLOPPY1. The directory name does not change. 4.$ SET DEFAULT [-] The SET DEFAULT command in this example changes the default directory to the parent directory of the one you are currently in. For example, if the current directory is $FLOPPY1:[WATER.MEMOS], this command sets your default to $FLOPPY1:[WATER]. If you are in $FLOPPY1:[WATER], this command sets your default to the master directory on the disk- $FLOPPY1:[000000]. 5.$ SAVEDEF = F$ENVIRONMENT("DEFAULT") $ SET DEFAULT [122001.JONES.APP10] . . . $ SET DEFAULT 'SAVEDEF' The command procedure in this example uses the F$ENVIRONMENT lexical function to save the current default directory in the symbol named SAVEDEF. The SET DEFAULT command changes the default directory 122001.JONES.APP10. Later, the symbol SAVEDEF is used to restore the original default directory. 6.$ SHOW DEFAULT WORK:[TOP] $ DEFINE X WORK:[TOP.SUB1],WORK:[TOP.SUB2] $ SET DEFAULT X $ SHOW DEFAULT X:[TOP] = WORK:[TOP.SUB1] = WORK:[TOP.SUB2] $ DIRECTORY Directory WORK:[TOP.SUB1] KUDOS.TMP;1 Total of 1 file. Directory WORK:[TOP.SUB2] KUDOS.TMP;1 Total of 1 file. Grand total of 2 directories, 2 files. $ DIRECTORY [] Directory WORK:[TOP] KUDOS.TMP;1 NETSERVER.LOG;2 Total of 2 files. In this example, the default directory is WORK:[TOP]. X is then defined to be a search list consisting of two subdirectories. When the SET DEFAULT X command is entered, the search list (X) is equated with the logical name SYS$DISK and is entered into the disk field. The subsequent SHOW DEFAULT command shows both the search list and the current default directory, followed by the expanded search list. If a DIRECTORY command is entered, the directories searched are those contained in the logical name X. However, if the current default directory specification ([]) is explicitly entered, the current default directory, rather than SYS$DISK, is searched. 2 DEVICE Establishes a print device or terminal as a spooled device or establishes the operational status for a device. Requires OPER (operator) privilege. Format SET DEVICE device-name[:] 3 Parameter device-name[:] Specifies the name of the device whose spooling or operational status is to change. The device must be a print device or a terminal if you want to change the spooling status; the device must be a disk or magnetic tape if you want to change the operational status. 3 Qualifiers /AVAILABLE /AVAILABLE /NOAVAILABLE Controls whether the specified disk or magnetic tape is to be considered available. You must dismount the specified disk or magnetic tape before entering the SET DEVICE/[NO]AVAILABLE command. If you specify the /NOAVAILABLE qualifier, any attempt to allocate or mount the specified disk or magnetic tape is prevented. Devices are automatically set /AVAILABLE when brought online even if the device had been previously set /NOAVAILABLE. /DUAL_PORT /DUAL_PORT /NODUAL_PORT Controls whether the port seize logic in the device driver of the specified disk is to be enabled. This qualifier should be used only on disks that contain a dual port kit and have been dismounted. /ERROR_LOGGING /ERROR_LOGGING /NOERROR_LOGGING Controls whether device errors are logged in the error log file. When you specify the /ERROR_LOGGING qualifier, all error messages reported by the device on which error logging is enabled are recorded in the error log file. Use the SHOW DEVICE/FULL command to find out the current status. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Controls whether log information is displayed at the terminal. /SPOOLED /SPOOLED[=(queue-name[:],intermediate-disk-name[:])] /NOSPOOLED Controls whether files are spooled to an intermediate disk. The queue name indicates the printer queue to which a file is queued. If a queue name is not supplied, the default is the name of either the printer or terminal. The intermediate disk name identifies the disk to which the spooled files are written. If the intermediate disk name is not supplied, the default is SYS$DISK (the current default disk). The intermediate disk must be mounted before files can be written to it. Once the device has been set spooled to a disk, that disk cannot be dismounted until the spooled device is set to /NOSPOOLED. All channels must be deassigned from a print device before its spooling characteristics can be changed. Also, the queue that is assigned to the device must be stopped. 3 Examples 1.$ SET DEVICE/SPOOLED=(LPA0) LPA0: In this example, the /SPOOLED qualifier requests that the printer queue LPA0 be spooled to an intermediate disk before files directed to the disk are printed. Because no intermediate disk was specified, the intermediate disk defaults to SYS$DISK. 2.$ SET DEVICE/ERROR_LOGGING DBB2: The SET DEVICE command in this example requests that all device errors reported on device DBB2 be logged in the error log file. 3.$ SET DEVICE/NOAVAILABLE DRA0: The SET DEVICE command in this example prevents any attempt to mount a disk on device DRA0. 4.$ SET DEVICE/DUAL_PORT DRA0: The SET DEVICE command in this example enables the dual port seize logic in device DRA0. 3 /SERVED Makes a disk on a local node available to all the nodes in an OpenVMS Cluster. Applies only to OpenVMS Cluster environments. You cannot use the SET DEVICE/SERVED command under the following conditions: o In service of a Phase II shadow set virtual unit o On devices that are already mounted o On system disks o On quorum disks Format SET DEVICE/SERVED node-name$DDcu: 4 Parameter node-name$DDcu: Specifies the device name of the device that you want to make available to the cluster. 4 Example $ SET DEVICE/SERVED DRA4: The SET DEVICE/SERVED command in this example instructs the MSCP server to make the disk device DRA4 on your local node available to all other processors on your cluster. 2 DIRECTORY Modifies the characteristics of one or more directories. See the qualifier descriptions for restrictions. Format SET DIRECTORY [device-name[:]]directory-spec[,...] 3 Parameters device-name[:] Specifies the device on which the directory that you want to modify is located. The device name parameter is optional. directory-spec[,...] Specifies one or more directories to be modified. If you specify more than one directory, separate the directory specifications with commas. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed. 3 Qualifiers /BACKUP Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /BACKUP qualifier selects directories according to the dates of their most recent backups. This qualifier is incompatible with the /CREATED, /EXPIRED, and /MODIFIED qualifiers, which also allow you to select directories according to time attributes. If you specify none of these four time qualifiers, the default is the /CREATED qualifier. /BEFORE /BEFORE[=time] Selects only those directories dated prior to the specified time. You can specify time as absolute time, as a combination of absolute and delta times, or as one of the following keywords: BOOT, LOGIN, TODAY (default), TOMORROW, or YESTERDAY. Specify one of the following qualifiers with the /BEFORE qualifier to indicate the time attribute to be used as the basis for selection: /BACKUP, /CREATED (default), /EXPIRED, or /MODIFIED. For complete information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. /BY_OWNER /BY_OWNER[=uic] Selects only those directories whose owner user identification code (UIC) matches the specified owner UIC. The default UIC is that of the current process. Specify the UIC by using standard UIC format as described in the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. The /OWNER_UIC qualifier requires control access, a system UIC, or privilege. /CONFIRM /CONFIRM /NOCONFIRM (default) Controls whether a request is issued before each SET DIRECTORY operation to confirm that the operation should be performed on that file. The following responses are valid: YES NO QUIT TRUE FALSE Ctrl/Z 1 0 ALL <Return> You can use any combination of uppercase and lowercase letters for word responses. Word responses can be abbreviated to one or more letters (for example, T, TR, or TRU for TRUE), but these abbreviations must be unique. Affirmative answers are YES, TRUE, and 1. Negative answers include: NO, FALSE, 0, and pressing the Return key. Entering QUIT or pressing Ctrl/Z indicates that you want to stop processing the command at that point. When you respond by entering ALL, the command continues to process, but no further prompts are given. If you type a response other than one of those in the list, DCL issues an error message and redisplays the prompt. /CREATED /CREATED (default) Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /CREATED qualifier selects directories based on their dates of creation. This qualifier is incompatible with the /BACKUP, /EXPIRED, and /MODIFIED qualifiers, which also allow you to select directories according to time attributes. If you specify none of these four time qualifiers, the default is the /CREATED qualifier. /EXCLUDE /EXCLUDE=(filespec[,...]) Excludes the specified directories from the SET DIRECTORY operation. You can include a directory but not a device in the file specification. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. However, you cannot use relative version numbers to exclude a specific version. If you specify only one directory, you can omit the parentheses. /EXPIRED Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /EXPIRED qualifier selects directories according to their expiration dates. (The expiration date is set with the SET FILE/EXPIRATION_DATE command.) The /EXPIRED qualifier is incompatible with the /BACKUP, /CREATED, and /MODIFIED qualifiers, which also allow you to select directories according to time attributes. If you specify none of these four time qualifiers, the default is the /CREATED qualifier. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Controls whether the system displays the directory specification of each directory that is modified as the command executes. /MODIFIED Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /MODIFIED qualifier selects directories according to the dates on which they were last modified. This qualifier is incompatible with the /BACKUP, /CREATED, and /EXPIRED qualifiers, which also allow you to select directories according to time attributes. If you specify none of these four time modifiers, the default is the /CREATED qualifier. /OWNER_UIC /OWNER_UIC[=uic] Requires control access, a system UIC, or privilege. Specifies an owner UIC for the directory. The default UIC is that of the current process. /SINCE /SINCE[=time] Selects only those directories dated after the specified time. You can specify time as absolute time, as a combination of absolute and delta times, or as one of the following keywords: BOOT, LOGIN, TODAY (default), TOMORROW, or YESTERDAY. Specify one of the following qualifiers with the /SINCE qualifier to indicate the time attribute to be used as the basis for selection: /BACKUP, /CREATED (default), /EXPIRED, or /MODIFIED. For complete information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. /VERSION_LIMIT /VERSION_LIMIT[=n] Specifies the total number of versions that a file in the specified directory can have. If you do not specify a version limit, a value of 0 is used, indicating that the number of versions of a file is limited only to the Files-11 architectural limit-32,767. If you change the version limit for the directory, the new value applies only to files created after the change has been made. The SET DIRECTORY version limit value refers to the number of files with the same file name and type that can exist in the directory at one time. It has no effect on the version number field of a particular file specification. Use the SET FILE command to set limits on file version numbers. To find out the current version limit for a directory, use the DIRECTORY/FULL command on a directory file and look at the File Attributes component of the output. 3 Examples 1.$ SET DIRECTORY/VERSION_LIMIT=5/CONFIRM [SMITH...] The SET DIRECTORY command in this example sets a version limit of five for all files in the SMITH directory and all subdirectories of [SMITH]. The /CONFIRM qualifier requests that you confirm whether the specified directory should actually be modified. Note that it affects only the files created after the command is entered. 2.$ SET DIRECTORY/OWNER_UIC=[360,020] [DAVIDSON],[USERS] The SET DIRECTORY command in this example modifies both the [DAVIDSON] and [USERS] directories, changing their owner UICs. Using the OWNER_UIC qualifier requires SYSPRV (system privilege). 2 DISPLAY Directs the output of an OpenVMS DECwindows application. Output can be directed from any processor running a DECwindows application, including workstations, to any DECwindows workstation. Both source and destination nodes must be part of the same network. Format SET DISPLAY [display-device] 3 Parameters display-device Specifies a logical name for the workstation display you are creating or modifying. If you are directing application output to multiple workstation displays, you can use different logical names to point to each display. If you do not specify a display- device parameter, the logical name DECW$DISPLAY is used. This means that, by default, application output will be displayed on the workstation display device referred to by DECW$DISPLAY. By entering the command SHOW DISPLAY, you can see the workstation node where applications will be displayed by default. If you specified your own logical name in the SET DISPLAY/CREATE command, include that logical name in the SHOW DISPLAY command. 3 Qualifiers /CREATE Creates the workstation display device (WSAn:) on which a DECwindows application is displayed. You must specify the /CREATE qualifier the first time you use the SET DISPLAY command, but you need not respecify it if you continue to redirect output from applications to other workstations with subsequent SET DISPLAY commands. When you specify the /CREATE qualifier without the /NODE qualifier, the workstation device defaults to the current node. /DELETE Cancels the redirected display by deassigning the logical name DECW$DISPLAY and deleting the created display device. If you specified a logical name as the display-device parameter with the SET DISPLAY/CREATE command, entering the SET DISPLAY /DELETE display-device command cancels the redirected display by deassigning the logical name you specified and deleting the created display device. The DECwindows Session Manager defines DECW$DISPLAY in your job logical name table when you open a terminal (DECterm) window. When you redirect application output to another workstation with the SET DISPLAY/CREATE command, an additional DECW$DISPLAY logical name is defined in your process logical name table. This definition supersedes the definition in the job logical name table. Output from applications run from the process in which you executed the SET DISPLAY/CREATE command will be displayed on the workstation referred to by the definition of DECW$DISPLAY in the process logical name table. Enter the SHOW DISPLAY command to see where this application will be displayed. To see whether multiple definitions for DECW$DISPLAY exist, enter the command SHOW LOGICAL DECW$DISPLAY. If DECW$DISPLAY is still defined (for example, in the job logical name table) after you specify the /DELETE qualifier, any DECwindows applications run from this process will be displayed on the workstation device to which output is now directed. Enter the SHOW DISPLAY command if you are unsure of the node to which DECW$DISPLAY refers. CAUTION If you modify or delete the definition of DECW$DISPLAY from the job logical name table, you will be unable to start another session. Be careful not to specify the /DELETE qualifier without having first redirected the display with the SET DISPLAY/CREATE command. You cannot specify the /DELETE and /CREATE qualifiers on the same command line. /EXECUTIVE_MODE Creates an executive-mode device and assigns the logical name DECW$DISPLAY to point to it. This qualifier must be used with the /CREATE qualifier. Devices created with the /EXECUTIVE_MODE qualifier are deleted only in the following situations: o They are explicitly deleted with the /DELETE qualifier. o The system is rebooted. To modify or delete executive-mode devices, you must have SYSNAM (system logical name) privilege. /NODE /NODE=workstation_display Defines the workstation on which you want to display DECwindows applications. The node name you provide cannot be a cluster alias (a name that represents multiple nodes configured in an OpenVMS Cluster), but must instead identify an actual node. You must create a workstation display device with the /CREATE qualifier before you can redirect the output from applications to other workstations. Do not enter the SET DISPLAY /NODE=workstation_display command without having previously specified the /CREATE qualifier. When you specify the /CREATE qualifier without the /NODE qualifier, the workstation defaults to the current node. Make sure that you are authorized to display applications on the workstation you specify. For more information about using the DECwindows Session Manager to authorize yourself to display applications from other nodes, see the DECwindows documentation. Each node, both source and destination, must be defined in the other's network node database. For example, to display applications on node HUBBUB from ZEPHYR, HUBBUB must be entered in ZEPHYR's network node database, and ZEPHYR must be entered in HUBBUB's network node database. In addition, users on ZEPHYR must be authorized in the DECwindows Session Manager to display applications on HUBBUB. For information about entering nodes in a network node database, see the DECnet for OpenVMS Networking Manual and the DECnet for OpenVMS Network Utilities Manual. /SCREEN /SCREEN=screen-number Defines the screen to be associated with this display device. In some hardware configurations, the system supports more than one screen. In such a configuration, you can specify the screen to which the application is directed. /SERVER /SERVER=server-number Defines the server to be associated with the display device indicated by the display-device parameter to the SET DEVICE command. Using the transport mechanism, the server passes data between the user and the application. In some hardware configurations, the system supports more than one server. In such a configuration, you can specify the server to which the application is directed. If you do not specify the display- device parameter, the SET DISPLAY/SERVER command associates the server with the display device indicated by the logical name DECW$DISPLAY. /SUPERVISOR_MODE /SUPERVISOR_MODE (default) Creates a supervisor-mode device and assigns the logical name DECW$DISPLAY to point to it. This qualifier must be used with the /CREATE qualifier. When the user logs out, the device is deleted. /TRANSPORT /TRANSPORT=transport-name Defines the mechanism, for example, DECnet or local, that passes information between the application and the workstation. The transport mechanism is used to send input from the user to the application and output from the application to the display. If you specify the /CREATE qualifier, the default transport is DECnet. Use the /TRANSPORT=LOCAL qualifier to optimize the performance of applications running and displaying on the same node. /USER_MODE Creates a user-mode display device and assigns the logical name DECW$DISPLAY to point to it. This qualifier must be used with the /CREATE qualifier. The lifetime of a user-mode device is one DECwindows image: when the next DECwindows image exits, the device is deleted. 3 Examples 1.$ SHOW DISPLAY Device: WSA1: [super] Node: 0 Transport: LOCAL Server: 0 Screen: 0 $ SET DISPLAY/CREATE/NODE=ZEPHYR/EXECUTIVE_MODE $ SHOW DISPLAY Device: WSA2: [exec] Node: ZEPHYR Transport: DECNET Server: 0 Screen: 0 $ SPAWN/NOWAIT/INPUT=NL: RUN SYS$SYSTEM:DECW$CLOCK $ SET DISPLAY/DELETE $ SHOW DISPLAY Device: WSA1: [super] Node: 0 Transport: LOCAL Server: 0 Screen: 0 In this example, you are logged in to your workstation (device WSA1:), here referred to as node 0. (0 is the standard shorthand notation for representing your node.) You want to run the DECwindows Clock on your workstation and display it on another workstation, ZEPHYR. Assuming you are authorized to display applications on ZEPHYR, you redirect the application's output to ZEPHYR with the SET DISPLAY command. The device created on ZEPHYR is an executive- mode device. You enter the SHOW DISPLAY command to verify the location of the redirected display. You then run Clock. When you finish running Clock, you disable the redirected display by entering the SET DISPLAY/DELETE command. Finally, you enter the SHOW DISPLAY command to verify that any applications subsequently run on your node will also be displayed there. Note that a new workstation display device, WSA2, is created when you enter the SET DISPLAY/CREATE command. When you cancel the redirected display with the SET DISPLAY/DELETE command, application output is once again displayed on the workstation display device referred to by WSA1. 2.$ SET DISPLAY/CREATE/NODE=FLOPSY RABBIT $ SHOW DISPLAY RABBIT Device: WSA2: [super] Node: FLOPSY Transport: DECNET Server: 0 Screen: 0 $ RUN/DETACHED/OUTPUT=WSA2: SYS$SYSTEM:DECW$CLOCK $ SET DISPLAY/CREATE/NODE=ZEPHYR ZNODE $ SHOW DISPLAY ZNODE Device: WSA3: [super] Node: ZEPHYR Transport: DECNET Server: 0 Screen: 0 $ RUN/DETACHED/OUTPUT=WSA3: SYS$SYSTEM:DECW$CALENDAR $ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:DECW$BOOKREADER $ SHOW DISPLAY Device: WSA1: [super] Node: 0 Transport: LOCAL Server: 0 Screen: 0 In this example, you are logged in to your node (device WSA1:), and want to direct the output from applications to several workstation displays in the same session. By specifying different logical names in the SET DISPLAY command, you can redirect the output without changing the logical name definition for DECW$DISPLAY. This allows you to display the output from most applications on your default display but occasionally display output on another workstation. You can also continue to run and display applications on your node. In this example, Clock is displayed on node FLOPSY, Calendar is displayed on node ZEPHYR, and Bookreader is displayed on your workstation. Note that to run your applications with the DCL command RUN/DETACHED, you must use the device name that equates to the logical display device name you specified in the SET DISPLAY command. Use the SHOW DISPLAY command to obtain this device name. 2 ENTRY Changes the current status or attributes of a job not currently executing in a queue. Requires delete (D) access to the job or manage (M) access to the queue. Format SET ENTRY entry-number[,...] 3 Parameter entry-number[,...] Specifies the entry number of the job you want to change. If you specify more than one entry, separate the entry numbers with commas (,). The system assigns a unique entry number to each queued print or batch job in the system. By default, the PRINT and SUBMIT commands display the entry number when they successfully queue a job for processing. These commands also create or update the local symbol $ENTRY to reflect the entry number of the most recently queued job. To find a job's entry number, enter the SHOW ENTRY or the SHOW QUEUE command. 3 Qualifiers /AFTER /AFTER=time /NOAFTER Requests that the specified job be held until after a specific time. If the specified time has already passed, the job is scheduled for processing. You can specify either absolute time or a combination of absolute and delta times. For complete information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_ Time in online help. To specify /AFTER for a job on hold, you must also specify /NOHOLD in order to cause the job to be held only until the specified time. Jobs can be released before the specified time by using the /NOAFTER or /RELEASE qualifier with the SET ENTRY command. /BURST /BURST /NOBURST Controls whether two file flag pages with a burst bar between them are printed preceding each file in a job. Use the /[NO]BURST qualifier to override the /DEFAULT qualifier options that have been set for the output queue you are using. The /[NO]BURST qualifier does not override the /SEPARATE qualifier options set for the queue. When you specify the /BURST qualifier for a file, the /[NO]FLAG qualifier does not add or subtract a flag page from the two flag pages that are printed preceding a file. /CHARACTERISTICS /CHARACTERISTICS=(characteristic[,...]) /NOCHARACTERISTICS Specifies the name or number of one or more characteristics to be associated with the job. Characteristics can refer to such things as color of ink. If you specify only one characteristic, you can omit the parentheses. A characteristic's number must range from 0 to 127. To see which characteristics have been defined for your system, use the SHOW QUEUE/CHARACTERISTICS command. To see which characteristics are associated with a particular queue, use the SHOW QUEUE/FULL command. A print job can be processed on an execution queue if none, some, or all of the characteristics associated with the queue also are associated with the job. That is, the job's characteristics must be a subset of the queue's characteristics. However, if any of the characteristics associated with the job are not associated with the queue, the job remains pending until one or more of the following occurs: o The characteristics specified with the queue are changed to make the job's characteristics a subset of the queue's characteristics (using, for example, the SET QUEUE /CHARACTERISTICS command). o The characteristics specified with the job are changed to make the job's characteristics a subset of the queue's characteristics (using, for example, the SET ENTRY /CHARACTERISTICS command). o The job is moved to a queue on which all the job's characteristics have been specified (using, for example, the SET ENTRY/REQUEUE command). o The job is deleted (using, for example, the DELETE/ENTRY command). /CLI /CLI=filename Specifies the name of a command language interpreter (CLI) to use in processing the batch job. The file name specifies that the CLI be SYS$SYSTEM:filename.EXE. If you do not specify the /CLI qualifier, the job is run by the CLI specified in the user authorization file (UAF), or whatever CLI was specified when the job was originally submitted to the queue. /COPIES /COPIES=n Specifies the number of copies to print. The value of n can be any number from 1 to 255. When you use the /COPIES qualifier with the SET ENTRY command, the number of copies can apply only to the entire print job. You cannot use this qualifier to specify different numbers of copies for individual files within a multifile job. /CPUTIME /CPUTIME=time Specifies a CPU time limit for the batch job. You can specify the time parameter as delta time, the value 0, INFINITE, or NONE. If the queue on which the job executes has a defined CPUMAXIMUM value, the smaller of the specified job and queue values is used. If the queue on which the job executes does not have a specified maximum CPU time limit, the smaller of the SUBMIT command and user authorization file (UAF) values is used. If the queue on which the job executes does not have a specified maximum CPU time limit and the UAF has a specified CPU time limit of NONE, either the value 0 or the keyword INFINITE allows unlimited CPU time. If you specify NONE, the specified queue or UAF value is used. CPU time values must be greater than or equal to the number specified by the system parameter PQL_MCPULM. For information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. /FEED /FEED /NOFEED Controls whether form feeds are inserted into the print job when the printer reaches the bottom margin of the form in use. You can suppress this automatic form feed (without affecting any of the other carriage control functions that are in place) by using the /NOFEED qualifier. When you use the /FEED qualifier with the SET ENTRY command, the qualifier applies to all files in the print job. You cannot use this qualifier to specify form feeds for individual files within a multifile job. /FLAG /FLAG /NOFLAG Controls whether a flag page is printed preceding each file in a print job. The flag page contains the name of the user submitting the job, the job entry number, and other information about the file being printed. Use the /[NO]FLAG qualifier to override the installation-defined defaults that have been set for the output queue you are using or to override the qualifier specified in the PRINT command that queued the job. /FORM /FORM=form Specifies the name or number of the form to be associated with the print job. If you omit the /FORM qualifier, the default form for the execution queue is associated with the job. Forms have attributes such as print image width and length or paper stock, which the print symbiont associates with a job when the job is processed. To see which forms have been defined for your system, use the SHOW QUEUE/FORM command. To find out which form is mounted currently on a particular queue and which form is specified as that queue's default form, use the SHOW QUEUE/FULL command. The stock of the form associated with the job must match the stock of the form mounted on the execution queue on which you want the job to be processed. If the stocks do not match, the job remains pending until one or more of the following occurs: o A form with the same stock as the job's form is mounted on the queue (using, for example, the SET QUEUE/FORM_MOUNTED command). o A form with the same stock as the queue's mounted form is specified with the job (using, for example, the SET ENTRY/FORM command). o The job is moved to a queue on which the stock of the mounted form matches the stock of the job's form (using, for example, the SET ENTRY/REQUEUE command). o The job is deleted (using, for example, the DELETE/ENTRY command). /HEADER /HEADER /NOHEADER Controls whether a heading line is printed at the top of each output page in a print job. /HOLD /HOLD /NOHOLD Controls whether the job is to be made available for processing or held for processing later. If you specify the /HOLD qualifier, the job is not released for processing until you enter SET ENTRY /NOHOLD or SET ENTRY/RELEASE. You can use the /NOHOLD qualifier to release jobs that have been held for the following reasons: o A job was submitted with the /HOLD qualifier. o A completed job is being retained in a queue. o A user-written symbiont has refused a job. /JOB_COUNT /JOB_COUNT=n Requests that an entire print job be printed n times, where n is a decimal integer from 1 to 255. This qualifier overrides the /JOB_COUNT qualifier with the PRINT command. /KEEP /KEEP /NOKEEP Controls whether the batch job log file is deleted after it is printed. /LOG_FILE /LOG_FILE[=filespec] /NOLOG_FILE Creates a log file with the specified file specification. You can specify a different device name, as long as the process executing the batch job has access to the device on which the log file will reside. Logical names in the file specification are translated in the context of the process that executes the SET ENTRY command. If you omit the /LOG_FILE qualifier and specify the /NAME qualifier, the log file is written to a file having the same file name as that specified by the /NAME qualifier; the file type is .LOG. When you omit the /LOG_FILE qualifier, the job-name value used with the /NAME qualifier must be a valid file name. /LOWERCASE /LOWERCASE /NOLOWERCASE Indicates whether the print job must be printed on a printer that can print both uppercase and lowercase letters. The /NOLOWERCASE qualifier means that files can be printed on printers that print only uppercase letters. If all available printers can print both uppercase and lowercase letters, you do not need to specify the /LOWERCASE qualifier. /NAME /NAME=job-name Names the job. The job name must be 1 to 39 alphanumeric characters. The SHOW ENTRY and SHOW QUEUE commands display the job name. For batch jobs, the job name is also used for the batch job log file. For print jobs, the job name is also used on the flag page of the printed output. The default job name is the name of the first file in the job. /NOCHECKPOINT For a batch job, erases the value established by the most recently executed SET RESTART_VALUE command. For a print job, clears the stored checkpoint so that the job will restart from the beginning. /NODELETE Cancels file deletion for a job that was submitted with the /DELETE qualifier. If you did not specify the /DELETE qualifier when the job was originally submitted to the queue, you cannot use the SET ENTRY command to establish file deletion at a later time. You cannot use the /NODELETE qualifier to cancel deletion of individual files in a multifile job. /NOTE /NOTE=string Specifies a message of up to 255 characters to appear on the flag page of the print job. Enclose messages containing lowercase letters, blanks, or other nonalphanumeric characters (including spaces) in quotation marks (" "). /NOTIFY /NOTIFY /NONOTIFY Controls whether a message notifies you when your job has been completed or aborted. Notification is sent to any terminal session on the same OpenVMS Cluster system at which you are logged in. /OPERATOR /OPERATOR=string Specifies a message string of up to 255 characters to be sent to the operator just before the print job begins to print. Enclose the message in quotation marks (" ") if it contains spaces, special characters, or lowercase characters. /PAGES /PAGES=([lowlim,]uplim) Specifies the number of pages to print for the specified job. You can use the /PAGES qualifier to print portions of long files. By default, all pages of the file are printed. When you use the /PAGES qualifier with the SET ENTRY command, the qualifier can apply only to an entire job. You cannot use this qualifier to specify different numbers of pages to be printed for individual files within a multifile job. The lowlim specifier refers to the first page of the file that you want to print. If you omit the lowlim specifier, the printing starts on the first page of the file. The uplim specifier refers to the last page of the file that you want to print. When you want to print to the end of the file but do not know how many pages are in the file, use quotation marks (" ") as the uplim specifier. You can omit the parentheses when you specify only a value for the uplim specifier. For example, /PAGES=10 prints the first 10 pages of the file; /PAGES=(5,10) prints pages 5 to 10; /PAGES=(5,"") starts printing at page 5 and continues until the end of the file is reached. /PARAMETERS /PARAMETERS=(parameter[,...]) Specifies from one to eight optional parameters to be passed to the job. Each parameter can have as many as 255 characters. If you specify only one parameter, you can omit the parentheses. To specify a parameter that contains any special characters or delimiters, enclose the parameter in quotation marks. For batch jobs, the parameters define values to be equated to the symbols named P1 to P8 in each command procedure in the job. The symbols are local to the specified command procedures. /PASSALL /PASSALL /NOPASSALL Specifies whether the symbiont bypasses all formatting of the print job and sends the output QIO to the driver with format suppressed. All qualifiers affecting formatting, as well as the /HEADER, /PAGES, and /PAGE_SETUP qualifiers, are ignored. When you use the /PASSALL qualifier with the SET ENTRY command, the qualifier applies to the entire job. You cannot use this qualifier to specify PASSALL mode for individual files within a multifile job. /PRINTER /PRINTER[=queue-name] /NOPRINTER Queues the batch job log file for printing when the job is completed. The default output queue for the log file is SYS$PRINT. The /PRINTER qualifier allows you to specify an output queue. The /NOPRINTER qualifier assumes the /KEEP qualifier. /PRIORITY /PRIORITY=n Requires OPER (operator) or ALTPRI (alter priority) privilege to raise the priority above the value of the queue's maximum scheduling priority. Specifies the job-scheduling priority of the job. The value of n is an integer in the range of 0 to 255, where 0 is the lowest priority and 255 is the highest. The default value for the /PRIORITY qualifier is the value of the system parameter DEFQUEPRI. No privilege is needed to set the priority lower than the queue's maximum scheduling priority. /RELEASE You can use the /RELEASE qualifier to release jobs that have been held for the following reasons: o A job was submitted with the /AFTER qualifier. o A job was submitted with the /HOLD qualifier. o A completed job is being retained in a queue. o A user-written symbiont has refused a job. /REQUEUE /REQUEUE=queue-name[:] Requests that the job be moved from the original queue to the specified queue. /RESTART /RESTART /NORESTART Specifies whether a batch or print job is restarted after a system failure or a STOP/QUEUE/REQUEUE command. /RETAIN /RETAIN=option Specifies the circumstances under which you want your jobs to be retained in a queue. When a job is retained in the queue, you can issue the SHOW QUEUE command after the job completes to see the status of the job. Without job retention, no record of a job is left in a queue after a job completes. Use the following options to specify job retention: o ALWAYS-Holds the job in the queue regardless of the job's completion status. o DEFAULT-Holds the job in the queue as specified by the queue's retention policy. o ERROR-Holds the job in the queue only if the job completes unsuccessfully. o UNTIL=time-value--Holds the job in the queue for the specified length of time, regardless of the job's completion status. NOTE You cannot specify a /NORETAIN qualifier with the SET ENTRY command (as system managers can with the commands INITIALIZE/QUEUE, START/QUEUE, and SET QUEUE). However, you can specify /RETAIN=DEFAULT with the SET ENTRY command. The default option holds the job in the queue as specified by the queue's retention policy. If the system manager has not specified retention for the queue, the job is not retained. How Job Retention is Determined Although you can specify job retention options for your own jobs, the job retention option you specify may be overridden by the job retention option of the queue on which your job executed. If you submit or print a job to a generic queue, the generic queue's job retention setting may also override the job retention option you specify. This section describes how job retention is determined. An execution queue's job retention setting takes precedence over a generic queue's job retention setting. However, if the job's completion status does not match the job retention setting (if any) on the execution queue, then the generic queue's job retention setting attempts to control job retention. If the job's completion status does not match the job retention setting (if any) on the generic queue, then the user-specified job retention setting is used. Jobs submitted directly to execution queues are not affected by job retention settings on generic queues. If the execution queue's retention setting applies, the job is retained on the execution queue. Likewise, if the generic queue's retention setting applies, the job is retained on the generic queue. If the user-specified setting applies, the job is retained in the queue to which it was submitted. The following example illustrates how the queue manager determines job retention: Suppose you submit a job to a generic queue and specify /RETAIN=ALWAYS, and the job completes successfully. First, the queue manager compares the job's completion status to the execution queue's retention setting. Suppose the queue is set with /RETAIN=ERROR (retains only jobs that complete unsuccessfully). The job is not retained in the execution queue because the error condition was not met. Second, the queue manager compares the job's completion status to the generic queue's retention setting. Suppose the generic queue has no retention setting. The queue manager's comparison again fails to retain the job. Finally, the queue manager compares the job's completion status to the retention setting you specified for the job. This comparison reveals that the job should be retained. Because the user-specified setting leads the queue manager to retain the job, the job is held in the queue to which the job was submitted-in this case, the generic queue. For more information on types of queues, see the INITIALIZE/QUEUE command. For more information on setting retention options for queues, see the INITIALIZE/QUEUE, START/QUEUE, or SET QUEUE command. Timed Retention Timed retention, which you specify using the UNTIL=time-value option, allows you to retain a job in the queue only as long as you need it. This eliminates the need to delete the job from the queue later. For example, the following command retains job 172 in the queue until 7:31 on April 19, when the job will automatically be deleted from the queue. $ SET ENTRY/RETAIN=UNTIL=14-DEC-1994:07:31:0.0 172 However, depending on the queue's job retention policy, the job might be retained indefinitely. The job retention policy set on the queue takes precedence over the user-specified job retention setting. Because system managers cannot specify timed job retention for a queue, any jobs retained as a result of a queue's setting are retained indefinitely. If you specify the /RETAIN=UNTIL=time-value option, you must supply a time value. The time value is first interpreted as a delta time, then as a combination time, and finally as absolute time. If you specify a delta time, the delta begins when the job completes. For example, if you specify SET ENTRY /RETAIN=UNTIL="+3:00", the job will be retained for three hours after the job completes. For information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual. /SETUP /SETUP=module[,...] Extracts the specified modules from the device control library (containing escape sequence modules for programmable printers) and copies the modules to the printer before each file in a print job is printed. When you use the /SETUP qualifier with the SET ENTRY command, the qualifier applies to the entire print job. You cannot use this qualifier to specify different setup modules for individual files within a multifile job. /SPACE /SPACE /NOSPACE Controls whether the output of a print job is double-spaced. Specifying the /NOSPACE qualifier causes the output to be single- spaced. When you use the /SPACE qualifier with the SET ENTRY command, the qualifier applies to the entire job. You cannot use this qualifier to specify different spacing for individual files within a multifile job. /TRAILER /TRAILER /NOTRAILER Controls whether a trailer page is printed at the end of each file in a print job. The trailer page displays the entry number, as well as information about the user submitting the job and the files being printed. When you use the /TRAILER qualifier with the SET ENTRY command, trailer pages are placed at the end of each file in a multifile job. Use the /[NO]TRAILER qualifier to override the installation- defined defaults that have been set for the output queue you are using or the qualifier specified in the PRINT command that queued the job. /WSDEFAULT /WSDEFAULT=n Defines, for a batch job, a working set default, which is the default number of physical pages that the job can use. If the queue on which the job executes has a nonzero default working set, the smaller of the specified job and queue values is used. If the queue on which the job executes has a working set default of zero, the smaller of the specified job value and the value established in the user authorization file (UAF) is used. Specify the value of n as a number of 512-byte pagelets on Alpha or 512-byte pages on VAX. Note that the operating system rounds up this value to the nearest CPU-specific page so that actual amount of physical memory allowed may be larger than the specified amount on Alpha. If you specify zero or NONE, the specified queue or UAF value is used. Working set default values must range between the numbers specified by the system parameters PQL_MWSDEFAULT and WSMAX. /WSEXTENT /WSEXTENT=n Defines, for the batch job, a working set extent, which is the maximum amount of physical memory that the job can use. The job uses the maximum amount of physical memory only when the system has excess free pages. If the queue on which the job executes has a nonzero working set extent, the smaller of the specified job and queue values is used. If the queue on which the job executes has a working set extent of zero, the smaller of the specified job value and the value established in the user authorization file (UAF) is used. Specify the value of n as a number of 512-byte pagelets on Alpha or 512-byte pages on VAX. Note that the operating system rounds up this value to the nearest CPU-specific page so that actual amount of physical memory allowed may be larger than the specified amount on Alpha. If you specify zero or NONE, the specified queue or UAF value is used. Working set extent values must range between the numbers specified by the system parameters PQL_MWSEXTENT and WSMAX. /WSQUOTA /WSQUOTA=n Defines, for the batch job, a working set quota, which is the amount of physical memory that the job is guaranteed. If the queue on which the job executes has a nonzero working set quota, the smaller of the specified job and queue values is used. If the queue on which the job executes has a working set quota of zero, the smaller of the specified job value or the value established in the user authorization file (UAF) is used. Specify the value of n as a number of 512-byte pagelets on Alpha or 512-byte pages on VAX. Note that the operating system rounds up this value to the nearest CPU-specific page so that actual amount of physical memory allowed may be larger than the specified amount on Alpha. If you specify zero or NONE, the specified queue or UAF value is used. Working set quota values must range between the numbers specified by the system parameters PQL_MWSQUOTA and WSMAX. 3 Examples 1.$ PRINT/HOLD MYFILE.DAT Job MYFILE (queue SYS$PRINT, entry 112) holding $ SET ENTRY 112/RELEASE/JOB_COUNT=3 The PRINT command in this example requests that the file MYFILE.DAT be queued to the system printer, but placed in a hold status. The SET ENTRY command releases the job for printing and requests that three copies of the job be printed. 2.$ SUBMIT CLIMATE Job CLIMATE (queue SYS$BATCH, entry 211) pending $ SET ENTRY 211/HOLD/NAME=TEMP The SUBMIT command in this example queues the command procedure CLIMATE.COM for processing as a batch job. The SET ENTRY command places the job in a hold state and changes the job name to TEMP, assuming that the job has not yet begun execution. 3.$ PRINT/FLAG=ALL/AFTER=20:00 MEMO.MEM, LETTER.MEM, REPORT.MEM/SPACE Job MEMO (queue SYS$PRINT, entry 172) holding until 20:00 $ SET ENTRY 172 /BURST/NOSPACE/HEADER The PRINT command in this example requests that three files be printed after 8:00 P.M. on the default printer with flag pages preceding each file. It also requests that the file REPORT.MEM be double-spaced. Later a SET ENTRY command calls for a burst page at the beginning of each file and requests that all files in the job be single-spaced. This command also requests that headers be printed on each page of each file in the job. 2 FILE Modifies the characteristics of one or more files. See the qualifier descriptions for restrictions. Format SET FILE filespec[,...] 3 Parameter filespec[,...] Specifies one or more files to be modified. If you specify more than one file, separate the file specifications with commas (,). The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed. 3 Qualifiers /ATTRIBUTE /ATTRIBUTE=(file-attribute[,...]) Sets the attributes associated with a file. The following table lists possible keywords and the relationship to both ACP-QIO and OpenVMS RMS File attributes: OpenVMS RMS File Keyword ACP-QIO File Attribute Attribute BKS:{value} FAT$B_BKTSIZE={byte} FAB$B_BKS={byte} DEQ:{value} FAT$W_DEFEXT={word} FAB$W_DEQ={word} EBK:{value} FAT$L_EFBLK={longword} XAB$L_EBK={longword} FFB:{value} FAT$W_FFBYTE={word} XAB$W_FFB={word} FSZ:{value} FAT$B_VFCSIZE={byte} FAB$B_FSZ={byte} GBC:{value} FAT$W_GBC={word} FAB$W_GBC={word} HBK:{value} FAT$L_HIBLK={longword} XAB$L_HBK={longword} LRL:{value} FAT$W_RSIZE={word} XAB$W_LRL={word} MRS:{value} FAT$W_MAXREC={word} FAB$W_MRS={word} ORG:IDX FAT$V_FILEORG=FAT$C_INDEXED FAB$B_ORG=FAB$C_IDX ORG:REL FAT$V_FILEORG=FAT$C_RELATIVE FAB$B_ORG=FAB$C_REL ORG:SEQ FAT$V_FILEORG=FAT$C_SEQUENTIAL FAB$B_ORG=FAB$C_SEQ RAT:BLK FAT$B_RATTRIB=FAT$M_NOSPAN FAB$B_RAT=FAB$M_BLK RAT:CR FAT$B_RATTRIB=FAT$M_IMPLIEDCC FAB$B_RAT=FAB$M_CR RAT:FTN FAT$B_RATTRIB=FAT$M_FORTRANCC FAB$B_RAT=FAB$M_FTN RAT:MSB FAT$B_RATTRIB=FAT$M_MSBVAR FAB$B_RAT=FAB$M_MSB RAT:NONE FAT$B_RATTRIB=0 FAB$B_RAT=0 RAT:PRN FAT$B_RATTRIB=FAT$M_PRINTCC FAB$B_RAT=FAB$M_PRN RFM:FIX FAT$V_RTYPE=FAT$C_FIXED FAB$B_RFM=FAB$C_FIX RFM:STM FAT$V_RTYPE=FAT$C_STREAM FAB$B_RFM=FAB$C_STM RFM:STMCR FAT$V_RTYPE=FAT$C_STREAMCR FAB$B_RFM=FAB$C_STMCR RFM:STMLF FAT$V_RTYPE=FAT$C_STREAMLF FAB$B_RFM=FAB$C_STMLF RFM:UDF FAT$V_RTYPE=FAT$C_UNDEFINED FAB$B_RFM=FAB$C_UDF RFM:VAR FAT$V_RTYPE=FAT$C_VARIABLE FAB$B_RFM=FAB$C_VAR RFM:VFC FAT$V_RTYPE=FAT$C_VFC FAB$B_RFM=FAB$C_VFC VRS:{value} FAT$W_VERSIONS={word} XAB$W_VERLIMIT={word} /BACKUP /BACKUP /NOBACKUP Specifies that the Backup utility (BACKUP) records the contents of the file. The /NOBACKUP qualifier causes BACKUP to record the attributes of the file but not its contents. This qualifier is valid only for Files-11 Structure On-Disk Level 2 files. The /NOBACKUP qualifier is useful for saving files that contain unimportant data, such as SWAPFILES. /BEFORE /BEFORE[=time] Selects only those files dated prior to the specified time. You can specify time as absolute time, as a combination of absolute and delta times, or as one of the following keywords: BOOT, LOGIN, TODAY (default), TOMORROW, or YESTERDAY. Specify the /CREATED or the /MODIFIED qualifier to indicate the time attribute to be used as the basis for selection. The /CREATED qualifier is the default. For complete information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. /BY_OWNER /BY_OWNER[=uic] Selects only those files whose owner user identification code (UIC) matches the specified owner UIC. The default UIC is that of the current process. Specify the UIC by using standard UIC format as described in the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. /CACHING /CACHING=option (Alpha only) On Alpha systems, this qualifier sets the caching attribute of files and directories stored in Spiralog volumes, whose device type is Files_64. It returns an error if any of the specified files and directories are not in Spiralog volumes. The caching attribute of a file specifies the default caching option for the file. This is the caching option that is used whenever an application accesses the file without specifying which caching option it wants to use. The value of option can be one of the following: o WRITEBEHIND Selects write-behind caching without flush on close. Write-behind caching improves the performance of write operations. It allows Spiralog to buffer writes to the file in your computer's cache and to reduce the number of I/Os to disk by amalgamating writes. This improves both application response time and overall data throughput. When an application writes to the file, Spiralog writes the data to its cache. The application proceeds as soon as the data is in the cache. Some time within the next 30 seconds, Spiralog writes the data to disk. o FLUSH_ON_CLOSE Selects write-behind caching with flush on close. This is identical to the WRITEBEHIND option except that the file's data is written to disk when the application closes the file. If the file has any data in your computer's Spiralog cache that has not yet been written to disk, Spiralog writes the data to disk before it closes the file. o WRITETHROUGH Selects write-through caching. Write-through caching writes data straight through to disk. When an application writes to the file, Spiralog writes the data straight through to disk before putting it in the cache. The application cannot proceed until the data is on disk. The caching attribute of a directory controls how the caching attribute is inherited by new files created in it. When you create a new directory or file, it inherits its caching attribute from its parent directory. When you create a new version of an existing file, the new file inherits its caching attribute from the highest version of the existing file. When you change the caching attribute of a directory, it does not affect the caching attribute of any existing files and subdirectories in the directory. When you change the caching attribute of a file, it does not affect the caching option being used by applications that are currently accessing the file. It affects only subsequent accesses to the file. /CONFIRM /CONFIRM /NOCONFIRM (default) Controls whether a request is issued before each SET FILE operation to confirm that the operation should be performed on that file. The following responses are valid: YES NO QUIT TRUE FALSE Ctrl/Z 1 0 ALL <Return> You can use any combination of uppercase and lowercase letters for word responses. Word responses can be abbreviated to one or more letters (for example, T, TR, or TRU for TRUE), but these abbreviations must be unique. Affirmative answers are YES, TRUE, and 1. Negative answers include: NO, FALSE, 0, and pressing the Return key. Entering QUIT or pressing Ctrl/Z indicates that you want to stop processing the command at that point. When you respond by entering ALL, the command continues to process, but no further prompts are given. If you type a response other than one of those in the list, DCL issues an error message and redisplays the prompt. /CREATED /CREATED (default) Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /CREATED qualifier selects files based on their dates of creation. This qualifier is incompatible with the /MODIFIED qualifier, which also allows you to select files according to time attributes. The /CREATED qualifier is the default qualifier. /DATA_CHECK /DATA_CHECK[=([NO]READ,[NO]WRITE)] Specifies whether a read data check (rereading each record), a write data check (reading each record after it is written), or a combination of the two is performed on the file during transfers. By default, a write data check is performed. /END_OF_FILE Resets the end-of-file (EOF) mark to the highest block allocated. /ENTER /ENTER=alias-filespec Use with caution. Creates an alias for the specified file. Both the original name and the new alias refer to the same file. To remove the alias, use the SET FILE /REMOVE command. NOTE Make sure that the alias and the original name are in different directories, or you may subsequently lose data during a delete or purge operation. The DELETE and PURGE commands and the file version limit feature can behave unpredictably if the original name and the alias are in the same directory. If you use aliases you must also be careful when you use the DELETE and SET FILE /REMOVE commands, or you may end up with either an inaccessable file that has no name or a name that does not refer to a file. Follow these guidelines to avoid these problems: o Use SET FILE /REMOVE to remove an alias; do not use the DELETE command to remove an alias. o Do not use SET FILE /REMOVE to remove the original file name. If you do not follow these guidelines and encounter problems, use ANALYZE /DISK /REPAIR to move inaccessable files to the SYSLOST directory and remove names that no longer refer to files. /ERASE_ON_DELETE Specifies that the specified files are erased from the disk (not just written over) when the DELETE or PURGE command is issued for the files. See the DELETE/ERASE command for more information. /EXCLUDE /EXCLUDE=(filespec[,...]) Excludes the specified file from the SET FILE operation. You can include a directory name but not a device name in the file specifications. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed in the file specification. However, you cannot use relative version numbers to exclude a specific version. If you specify only one file, you can omit the parentheses. /EXPIRATION_DATE /EXPIRATION_DATE=date /NOEXPIRATION_DATE Requires read (R), write (W), and control access. Being the owner of the file is one way to get control access. Controls whether an expiration date is assigned to the specified files. Specify the date according to the rules described in the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. Absolute date keywords are allowed. If you specify zero as the date, today's date is used. /EXTENSION /EXTENSION[=n] Sets the extend quantity default for the file. The value of the parameter n can range from 0 to 65,535. If you omit the value specification or specify a value of 0, OpenVMS Record Management Services (OpenVMS RMS) calculates its own value for the /EXTENSION qualifier. See the SET RMS_DEFAULT command for a description of the /EXTEND_ QUANTITY qualifier. /GLOBAL_BUFFER /GLOBAL_BUFFER=n Sets the OpenVMS Record Management Services (OpenVMS RMS) global buffer count (the number of buffers that can be shared by processes accessing the file) for the specified files. The value n must be an integer in the range from 0 to 32,767. A value of 0 disables buffer sharing. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Displays the file specification of each file modified as the command executes. /MODIFIED /MODIFIED Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /MODIFIED qualifier selects files according to the dates on which they were last modified. This qualifier is incompatible with the /CREATED qualifier, which also allows you to select files according to time attributes. If you do not specify the /MODIFIED qualifier, the default is the /CREATED qualifier. /MOVE /MOVE /NOMOVE Controls whether movefile operations are enabled on the specified file. When you create a file, movefile operations are enabled on that file. You should disable movefile operations on specialized files that are accessed other than through the XQP (such as files accessed through logical I/O to a disk). Note that movefile operations are automatically disabled on critical system files. Do not enable movefile operations on these files. /NODIRECTORY Use with extreme caution. Requires SYSPRV (system privilege). Removes the directory attributes of a file and allows you to delete the corrupted directory file even if other files are contained in the directory. When you delete a corrupted directory file, the files contained within it are lost. Use ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE/REPAIR to place the lost files in [SYSLOST]. You can then copy the lost files to a new directory. This qualifier is valid only for Files-11 On-Disk Structure Level 2 files. For more information about the Verify utility, see the OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual. /OWNER_UIC /OWNER_UIC[=uic] Requires GRPPRV (group privilege) to set the owner to another member of the same group. Requires SYSPRV (system privilege) to set the owner to any user identification code (UIC) outside your group. Specifies an owner UIC for the file. The default is the UIC of your process. Specify the UIC by using standard UIC format as described in the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. /PROTECTION /PROTECTION[=(ownership[:access][,...])] Cannot be used to change the protection on a file via DECnet software. Enables you to change or reset the protection for one or more of your files. o Specify the ownership parameter as system (S), owner (O), group (G), or world (W). o Specify the access parameter as read (R), write (W), execute (E), or delete (D). If you specify the /PROTECTION qualifier without an ownership and access code, the file protection is set according to the current default protection. For more information on specifying protection codes, see the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. /REMOVE Use with caution. Enables you to remove one of the names of a file that has more than one name, without deleting the file. If you have created an additional name for a file with the /ENTER qualifier of SET FILE, you can use the /REMOVE qualifier to remove either the original name or the alias. The file still exists and can be accessed by whatever name or names remain in effect. However, if you accidentally remove the name of a file that has only one name, you cannot access that file with most DCL commands; use the ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE utility to retrieve the file. /SEMANTICS /SEMANTICS=semantics-tag /NOSEMANTICS Use the /SEMANTICS qualifier to create or change a semantics tag. Use the /NOSEMANTICS qualifier to remove a semantics tag from a file. For more information, see the Guide to OpenVMS File Applications. /SHELVABLE /SHELVABLE /NOSHELVABLE Controls whether the file is shelvable. /SINCE /SINCE[=time] Selects only those files dated after the specified time. You can specify time as absolute time, as a combination of absolute and delta times, or as one of the following keywords: BOOT, LOGIN, TODAY (default), TOMORROW, or YESTERDAY. Specify the /CREATED or the /MODIFIED qualifier to indicate the time attribute to be used as the basis for selection. The /CREATED qualifier is the default. For complete information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. /STATISTICS /STATISTICS /NOSTATISTICS (default) Enables the gathering of RMS statistics on the specified file. These statistics can then be viewed by using the Monitor utility, which is invoked with the DCL command MONITOR. The SET FILE/STATISTICS command applies an application ACE to the specified file. The ACE does not affect access control and is only meaningful to the application assigning it. /TRUNCATE Truncates the file at the end of the block containing the end-of- file (EOF) marker, that is, the qualifier releases allocated but unused blocks of the file. /UNLOCK Makes one or more improperly closed files accessible. /VERSION_LIMIT /VERSION_LIMIT[=n] Specifies the maximum number of versions for the specified file. If you do not specify a version limit, a value of 0 is used, indicating that the number of versions of a file is limited only to the Files-11 architectural limit of 32,767. When you exceed that limit, the earliest version of the file is deleted from the directory without notification to the user. For example, if you set the version limit to three when there are already five versions of that file in your directory, there will continue to be five versions of the file unless you specifically delete some or purge the directory. Once the number of versions is equal to or less than the current version limit, the version limit is maintained. 3 Examples 1.$ SET FILE/EXPIRATION_DATE=19-APR-1995:11:00 BATCH.COM;3 The SET FILE command requests that the expiration date of the file BATCH.COM;3 be set to 11:00 A.M., April 19, 1995. 2.$ SET FILE/BEFORE=31-DEC/ERASE_ON_DELETE PERSONNEL*.SAL This SET FILE command calls for all files that match the file specification PERSONNEL*.SAL and are dated before December 31 of the current year to have their disk locations erased whenever one of them is deleted with commands such as DELETE or PURGE. 3.$ SET FILE/OWNER_UIC=[360,020]/VERSION_LIMIT=100 MYFILE.DAT The SET FILE command modifies the characteristics of the file MYFILE.DAT, changing the owner user identification code (*). You must have system privilege (SYSPRV) to change the owner UIC. 4.$ SET FILE/NOMOVE TEST.FDL $DIRECTORY/FULL TEST.FDL Directory SYS$SYSDEVICE:[SMITH] TEST.FDL;1 File ID: (10,8,0) . . . File attributes: Allocation: s, Extend: 0, Global buffer count: 0 No version limit, MoveFile disabled . . . Movefile operations are disabled on the file TEST.FDL. A DIRECTORY/FULL command on the file TEST.FDL affirms that the file attribute Movefile is disabled. 5.$ SET FILE/ATTRIBUTES=ORG:SEQ - _$ TEST$:[DATA]SET_ATTRIBUTES.DATA_FILE/LOG %SET-I-MODIFIED, TEST$:[DATA]SET_ATTRIBUTES.DATA_FILE;1 MODIFIED The command, SET FILE/ATTRIBUTES, changes the file organization of the specified file. 6.$ SET FILE/PROTECTION=(S:RWE,O=RWE,G:RE,W:RE) TEMP.DIR $ DIRECTORY/PROTECTION TEMP.DIR Directory DKB0:[SMITH] TEMP.DIR;1 (RWE,RWE,RE,RE) This example sets the protection on the TEMP.DIR file with the SET FILE command and then displays the protection of the file with the DIRECTORY command. 3 /AI_JOURNAL The SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL command marks one or more RMS files for after-image journaling. You can also specify certain characteristics of the journal with this command, including its file specification, whether it is to be created, its initial size, and its default extension quantity. The SET FILE/NOAI_ JOURNAL command unmarks a file for after-image journaling. The SET FILE command is not supported for remote files. You must use the SET FILE command from the system where the file is located. Format SET FILE/[NO]AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=journal-filespec[,...]) data-filespec[,...] 4 Parameter data-filespec[,...] Identifies the file to be marked for after-image journaling. If you specify more than one file, separate the file specifications with commas. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed. The file specification cannot include a node name, since the SET FILE command is not valid for network access. 4 Description The SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL command marks one or more RMS files for after-image journaling. You can also specify certain characteristics of the journal with this command, including its file specification, whether it is to be created, its initial size, and its default extension quantity. The SET FILE/NOAI_ JOURNAL command unmarks a file for after-image journaling. After a data file is marked for after-image journaling with the SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL command, the following events occur whenever the file is opened by RMS for write operations: o The journal is opened. o All subsequent modifications to the data file are recorded in the journal. NOTE In order to be able to recover the data file at a later time, you must make a backup copy of the data file, even if it contains no data. You must use the FILE keyword to specify a journal. By default, any portions of the file specification that you omit will be the same as the data file that is to be journaled, but with the file type RMS$JOURNAL. That is, if you issue the following command, then, by default, the file specification for the after-image journal is JOURNAL_DISK:PAYROLL.RMS$JOURNAL: $ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JOURNAL_DISK:) FINANCE_DISK:PAYROLL.DAT You should always keep the journal for after-image applications on a different volume from that of your data file. If recovery becomes necessary, you will be able to perform after-image recovery only if a backup copy of the data file is available. Use the FILE keyword to specify the journal location. Use the SET FILE/NOAI_JOURNAL command to unmark a file for after- image journaling. After you use the SET FILE/NOAI_JOURNAL command for a file, modifications to that data file will no longer be written to the journal. You must use the SET FILE/NOAI_JOURNAL command before you can delete a file that has been marked for after-image journaling. 4 Keywords Four keywords are used as parameters to the SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL command: ALLOCATION, [NO]CREATE, EXTEND_QUANTITY, and FILE. You must always use the FILE keyword; you can also use any, all, or none of the other three keywords. Use an equal sign (=) immediately after the SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL command to use a keyword. If you use more than one of the keywords, enclose the list in parentheses and separate the items in the list with commas. ALLOCATION=n Specifies the initial size, in blocks, of the journal. The ALLOCATION keyword is meaningful only when the CREATE keyword is also used. The default allocation is 0 blocks. CREATE Specifies that a new journal is to be created. If no journal exists, using this keyword creates a new one. If a journal (with the file specification given in this command) already exists, using this keyword creates a new version of the journal. In the latter instance, the data file named in this SET FILE command is journaled to the new journal. Any other files that are being journaled to the previous version of the journal will continue to be journaled to that previous version. If a journal does not already exist, be sure to use the CREATE keyword with the SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL command. If you do not specify the CREATE keyword and the file that you specify with the FILE keyword does not exist, a journal will not automatically be created and an error message is displayed. When you create a journal for after-image journaling, the file protection for the journal is determined as follows: o If a version of the journal that you specify with the CREATE keyword already exists, then the new version of the journal has the same file protection and access control list (ACL) as the most recent version. o If there is no existing journal (that is, if you are creating version 1 of the journal), then the file protection and ACL of the journal are the default file protection for the process that creates the journal, except that none of the four ownership categories (system, owner, group, world) is given delete access. Also, every time that you use the CREATE keyword, be sure to make a backup copy of the data file. (If it is the first time that the data file is marked for after-image journaling, then you must make a backup copy of the data file, regardless of whether the CREATE keyword is used.) NOTE To be able to recover the data file at a later time, you must mark the file for journaling, and then make a backup copy of the data file, even if it contains no data. In most cases (in particular, when you are using after-image journaling to protect against loss of data from a device failure), you should keep the backup copy on a different volume from the data file. If recovery becomes necessary, you will be able to perform after-image recovery only if a backup copy of the data file is available. If you want to use a single journal for both after-image and before-image journaling, do not use the CREATE keyword with both the /AI_JOURNAL and /BI_JOURNAL qualifiers, because that will create two separate journals. When you create a journal that will be used for more than one data file or more than one type of journaling (after-image or before-image), you should first use a SET FILE command to create the journal for a single type of journaling and for a single data file. After the journal is created, then you can use a single SET FILE command for multiple data files and both after-image and before-image journaling. For example, you might use the following sequence of commands: $ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:,CREATE) [WEEKLY]SALES.DAT $ SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:[WEEKLY]SALES) - _$INVOICES.DAT,COMMISSIONS.DAT EXTEND_QUANTITY=n Specifies the default extension quantity, in blocks, for the journal. You can specify a value from 0 to 65,535. The EXTEND_QUANTITY keyword is meaningful only when you use the CREATE keyword. If the file is extended, the value that you specify is used. If you do not use the EXTEND_QUANTITY keyword when you create a journal, RMS calculates its own EXTEND_QUANTITY value for the journal. FILE=journal-filespec Specifies the journal where all modifications to the named data file will be recorded. The default file specification for the journal is the file specification of the data file that you name, but with a file type of RMS$JOURNAL. If you provide a partial file specification for the journal, any unspecified portions are taken from the default file specification. The FILE keyword is required when you use the SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL command. If you are using after-image journaling to protect against the loss of data due to a device failure (such as a head crash), you should keep the journal on a different volume from the one on which the data file is kept. Only by keeping the data file and journals on separate volumes can you use after-image recovery to restore the data file if its recording medium becomes corrupted (for example, by a disk head crash). If you issue the SET FILE /AI_JOURNAL command and the journal is on the same volume as the data file being marked for after-image journaling, the INVAIJDEV warning message is issued. The file specification cannot include a node name, since the SET FILE command is not valid for network access. You can use a single journal for multiple data files for after- image journaling, and you can also use a single journal for both after-image and before-image journaling. 4 Qualifier /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Controls whether the SET FILE command displays the file specification and the type of journaling that has been set. By default, this information is not displayed. 4 EXAMPLES 1.$ SET FILE /AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JOURNAL_DISK:,CREATE) - _$FINANCE_DISK:[PAYROLL]WEEKLY.DAT In this example, the file FINANCE_DISK:[PAYROLL]WEEKLY.DAT is marked for after-image journaling. The required FILE keyword is used to place the journal on the disk JOURNAL_DISK, and the CREATE keyword generates a new version of the journal. The file specification for the journal will be JOURNAL_ DISK:[PAYROLL]WEEKLY.RMS$JOURNAL. The next step in the after-image journaling process after issuing this command is to back up the data file. 2.$ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JOURNAL_DISK:,CREATE)/LOG SALES.DAT %SET-I-JCREATED, journal JOURNAL_DISK:[REGION_1]SALES.RMS$JOURNAL;1 created %SET-I-FILMARKAI, FINANCE_DISK:[REGION_1]SALES.DAT;1 marked for RMS after-image journaling -SET-I-JFILE, using journal JOURNAL_DISK:[REGION_1]SALES.RMS$JOURNAL;1 %SET-I-MODIFIED, FINANCE_DISK:[REGION_1]SALES.DAT;1 modified In this example, the file SALES.DAT in default directory FINANCE_DISK:[REGION_1] is marked for after-image journaling and the /LOG qualifier causes the result of the SET FILE command to be displayed on the terminal. 3.$ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:,CREATE)/LOG OVERDUE.DAT %SET-I-JCREATED, journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL;1 created %SET-I-FILMARKAI, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 marked for RMS after-image journaling -SET-I-JFILE, using journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL;1 %SET-I-MODIFIED, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 modified $ SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:)/RU_JOURNAL/LOG OVERDUE.DAT %SET-I-FILMARKBI, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 marked for RMS before-image journaling -SET-I-JFILE, using journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL;1 %SET-I-FILMARKRU, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 marked for RMS recovery-unit journaling %SET-I-MODIFIED, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 modified In this example, the file OVERDUE.DAT is marked for all three types of journaling using two SET FILE commands. A single journal (JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL) will be used for after-image and before-image journaling. The first SET FILE command uses the /CREATE qualifier to create a new after-image journal, JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL. The file specification uses the current default directory [PAYABLE] and the default file extension RMS$JOURNAL. The second SET FILE command checks the disk JNL_DISK to see whether a journal already exists, and uses the existing journal for before-image journaling, as well as after-image journaling. 4.$ SET FILE/NOAI_JOURNAL/NOBI_JOURNAL - _$ WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT,VENDORS.DAT In this example, the files OVERDUE.DAT and VENDORS.DAT are unmarked for both after-image and before-image journaling. It is not necessary to specify the journals that were used. If more than one journaling type was applied to the data files (as in the previous example), then you must cancel each of the journaling types before you can delete the data files. 5.$ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JOURNAL_DISK,CREATE)- _$ /RU_JOURNAL [FIELD]SALARY.DAT $ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JOURNAL_DISK:[FIELD]SALARY)- _$ /RU_JOURNAL CHECKS.DAT In this example, the files SALARY.DAT and CHECKS.DAT are both marked for after-image and for recovery unit journaling. The after-image journaling for both files is written to the same journal, JOURNAL_DISK:[FIELD]SALARY.RMS$JOURNAL. 3 /BI_JOURNAL The SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL command marks one or more RMS files for before-image journaling. You can also specify certain characteristics of the journal with this command, including its file specification, whether it is to be created, its initial size, and its default extension quantity. The SET FILE/NOBI_ JOURNAL command unmarks a file for before-image journaling. The SET FILE command is not supported for remote files. You must use the SET FILE command from the system where the file is located. Format SET FILE/[NO]BI_JOURNAL[=(keyword[,...])] data-filespec[,...] 4 Parameter data-filespec[,...] Identifies the file to be marked for before-image journaling. If you specify more than one file, separate the file specifications with commas. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed. The file specification cannot include a node name, since the SET FILE command is not valid for network access. 4 Description The SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL command marks one or more RMS files for before-image journaling. You can also specify certain characteristics of the journal with this command, including its file specification, whether it is to be created, its initial size, and its default extension quantity. The SET FILE/NOBI_ JOURNAL command unmarks a file for before-image journaling. After a data file is marked for before-image journaling with the SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL command, the following events occur whenever the data file is opened by RMS for write operations: o The journal is opened. o All subsequent modifications to the data file are recorded in the journal. By default, the journal has the same file specification as the data file that is to be journaled, but with the file type RMS$JOURNAL. That is, if you issue the following command, then, by default, the file specification for the before-image journal is FINANCE_DISK:PAYROLL.RMS$JOURNAL: $ SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL FINANCE_DISK:PAYROLL.DAT If erroneous or corrupt data is introduced into the data file, you can use the RMS Recovery Utility to "roll back" the data file that has been marked for before-image journaling. This will allow you to restore the data file to a previous state by removing data until a specified time (prior to the introduction of bad data). Use the SET FILE/NOBI_JOURNAL command to unmark a file for before-image journaling. After you use the SET FILE/NOBI_JOURNAL command for a file, modifications to that data file will no longer be written to the journal. You must use the SET FILE/NOBI_JOURNAL command before you can delete a file that has been marked for before-image journaling. 4 Keywords Four keywords are used as optional parameters to the SET FILE /BI_JOURNAL command: ALLOCATION, [NO]CREATE, EXTEND_QUANTITY, and FILE. You can use any, all, or none of these keywords. Use an equal sign (=) immediately after the SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL command to use a keyword. If you use more than one of the keywords, enclose the list in parentheses and separate the items in the list with commas. ALLOCATION=n Specifies the initial size, in blocks, of the journal. The ALLOCATION keyword is meaningful only when the CREATE keyword is also used. The default allocation is 0 blocks. CREATE Specifies that a new journal is to be created. If no journal exists, using this keyword creates a new one. If a journal (with the file specification given in this command) already exists, using this keyword creates a new version of the journal. In the latter instance, the data file named in this SET FILE command is journaled to the new journal. Any other files that are being journaled to the previous version of the journal will continue to be journaled to that previous version. If a journal does not already exist, be sure to use the CREATE keyword with the SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL command. If you do not specify the CREATE keyword and a journal does not exist, a journal is not automatically created and an error message is displayed. When you create a journal for before-image journaling, the file protection for the journal is determined as follows: o If a version of the journal that you specify with the CREATE keyword already exists, then the new version of the journal has the same file protection and access control list (ACL) as the most recent version. o If there is no existing journal (that is, if you are creating version 1 of the journal), then the file protection and ACL of the journal are the default file protection for the process that creates the journal, except that none of the four ownership categories (system, owner, group, world) is given delete access. If you want to use a single journal for both after-image and before-image journaling, do not use the CREATE keyword with both the /AI_JOURNAL and /BI_JOURNAL qualifiers, because that will create two separate journals. When you create a journal that will be used for more than one data file or more than one type of journaling (after-image or before-image), you should first use a SET FILE command to create the journal for a single type of journaling and for a single data file. After the journal is created, then you can use a single SET FILE command for multiple data files and both after-image and before-image journaling. For example, you might use the following sequence of commands: $ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:,CREATE) [WEEKLY]SALES.DAT $ SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:[WEEKLY]SALES) - _$INVOICES.DAT,COMMISSIONS.DAT EXTEND_QUANTITY=n Specifies the default extension quantity, in blocks, for the journal. You can specify a value from 0 to 65,535. The EXTEND_QUANTITY keyword is meaningful only when you use the CREATE keyword. If the file is extended, the value that you specify is used. If you do not use the EXTEND_QUANTITY keyword when you create a journal, RMS calculates its own EXTEND_QUANTITY value for the journal. FILE=journal-filespec Specifies the journal where all before-image journal entries for the data file will be recorded. The default file specification for the journal is the file specification of the data file that you name, but with a file type of RMS$JOURNAL. Use the FILE keyword if you wish to modify this default file specification for the journal. If you provide a partial file specification for the before-image journal, any unspecified portions are taken from the default file specification. The file specification cannot include a node name, since the SET FILE command is not valid for network access. The FILE keyword is optional with the SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL command. You can use a single journal for multiple data files for before- image journaling, and you can also use the same journal for both before-image and after-image journaling. 4 Qualifier /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Controls whether the SET FILE command displays the file specification and the type of journaling that has been set. By default, this information is not displayed. 4 EXAMPLES 1.$ SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JOURNAL_DISK:,CREATE) - _$FINANCE_DISK:[PAYROLL]WEEKLY.DAT In this example, the file FINANCE_DISK:[PAYROLL]WEEKLY.DAT is marked for before-image journaling. The FILE keyword, together with the defaults obtained from the file specification of the data file, provides the journal with a file specification of JOURNAL_DISK:[PAYROLL]WEEKLY.RMS$JOURNAL. Because the CREATE keyword was used, this journal is created when this SET FILE command is given. 2.$ SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL=CREATE/LOG SALES.DAT %SET-I-JCREATED, journal FINANCE_DISK:[REGION_1]SALES.RMS$JOURNAL;1 created %SET-I-FILMARKBI, FINANCE_DISK:[REGION_1]SALES.DAT marked for RMS before-image journaling -SET-I-JFILE, using journal FINANCE_DISK:[REGION_1]SALES.RMS$JOURNAL;1 %SET-I-MODIFIED, FINANCE_DISK:[REGION_1]SALES.DAT modified In this example, the file SALES.DAT in default directory FINANCE_DISK:[REGION_1] is marked for before-image journaling and the /LOG qualifier causes the result of the SET FILE command to be displayed on the terminal. 3.$ SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:, CREATE)/LOG OVERDUE.DAT %SET-I-JCREATED, journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL;1 created %SET-I-FILMARKBI, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 marked for RMS before-image journaling -SET-I-JFILE, using journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL;1 %SET-I-MODIFIED, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 modified $ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:)/RU_JOURNAL/LOG OVERDUE.DAT %SET-I-FILMARKAI, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 marked for RMS after-image journaling -SET-I-JFILE, using journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL;1 %SET-I-FILMARKRU, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 marked for RMS recovery-unit journaling %SET-I-MODIFIED, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 modified In this example, the file OVERDUE.DAT is marked for all three types of journaling using two SET FILE commands. A single journal (JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL) will be used for after-image and before-image journaling. The first SET FILE command uses the /CREATE qualifier to create a new before-image journal, JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL. The file specification uses the current default directory [PAYABLE] and the default file extension RMS$JOURNAL. The second SET FILE command checks the disk JNL_DISK to see whether a journal already exists, and uses the existing journal for after-image journaling, as well as before-image journaling. 4.$ SET FILE/NOBI_JOURNAL/NOAI_JOURNAL- _$ WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT,VENDORS.DAT In this example, the files OVERDUE.DAT and VENDORS.DAT are unmarked for both before-image and after-image journaling. It is not necessary to specify the journals that were used. If more than one journaling type was applied to the data files (as in the previous example), then you must cancel each of the journaling types before you can delete the data files. 5.$ SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JOURNAL_DISK,CREATE)/RU_JOURNAL [FIELD]SALARY.DAT $ SET FILE/BI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JOURNAL_DISK:[FIELD]SALARY)/RU_JOURNAL CHECKS.DAT In this example, the files SALARY.DAT and CHECKS.DAT are both marked for before-image and for recovery unit journaling. The before-image journaling for both files is written to the same journal, JOURNAL_DISK:[FIELD]SALARY.RMS$JOURNAL. 3 /RU_ACTIVE The SET FILE/RU_ACTIVE command designates the recoverable facility that controls active recovery units for the file. Alternatively, when used with the /RU_FACILITY qualifier, the SET FILE/RU_ACTIVE command lets you clear the designated recoverable facility that controls active recovery units for the specified file. The SET FILE command is not supported for remote files. You must use the SET FILE command from the system where the file is located. Format SET FILE/[NO]RU_ACTIVE=ru-facility data-filespec[,...] 4 Parameters ru-facility Specifies the number or name of a recoverable facility. It can be an integer from 0 through 255, or it can be the name of a Digital-registered recoverable facility. Facility numbers 1 through 127 are reserved by Digital; facility numbers 128 through 255 are available for user-written recoverable facilities. RMS is recoverable facility 1; specifying the number 1 is equivalent to using the text * corresponds to no recoverable facility and is equivalent to using the qualifier /NORU_ACTIVE. Currently, the only Digital-defined recoverable facility is 1 (RMS). data-filespec[,...] Specifies the file that is to be modified. If you specify more than one file, separate the file specifications with commas. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed. The file specification cannot include a node name, since the SET FILE command is not valid for network access. 4 Description The SET FILE/RU_ACTIVE command designates the recoverable facility that controls active recovery units for the file. Alternatively, when used with the /RU_FACILITY qualifier, the SET FILE/RU_ACTIVE command lets you clear the designated recoverable facility that controls active recovery units for the specified file. This is useful if a data file is unavailable due to active recovery units and an unavailable recovery unit journal. CAUTION When you clear the RU_ACTIVE attribute (using the command SET FILE/RU_ACTIVE=0/RU_FACILITY=1), the data in the file is likely to be in an inconsistent state. Do not use the data file unless you can ensure that the data is consistent. After clearing the RU_ACTIVE attribute, you can unmark the file for journaling, delete the file, and re-create a consistent file using a backup copy. You can determine the recoverable facility that controls active recovery units (if any) for the file by entering the DCL command DIRECTORY/FULL or DUMP/HEADER. You can use the ANALYZE/RMS_FILE /RU_JOURNAL command to determine the state of any active recovery units. 4 Qualifier /LOG /LOG /NOLOG(default) Controls whether the SET FILE command displays the file specification and the type of facility that has been specified. By default, this information is not displayed. 4 EXAMPLES 1.$ SET FILE/RU_FACILITY=1/RU_ACTIVE=0- _$ FINANCE_DISK:[PAYROLL]WEEKLY.DAT If the file WEEKLY.DAT is unavailable due to active recovery units and an unavailable recovery unit journal, you can use this command to gain access to the file. In this example, the recoverable facility is defined as RMS by the /RU_FACILITY=1 qualifier. The RU_ACTIVE attribute that indicates active RMS recovery units for the file WEEKLY.DAT is cleared by the /RU_ ACTIVE=0 qualifier. CAUTION The data in the file may be inconsistent if there are active recovery units. Digital recommends that you not use the contents of the data file unless you can verify that the data is consistent. Digital also recommends that you make a new copy of the file using the Convert Utility and that you use the converted copy in place of the original. 3 /RU_FACILITY The SET FILE/RU_FACILITY command allows you to identify the recoverable facility that controls active recovery units on the file. The SET FILE command is not supported for remote files. You must use the SET FILE command from the system where the file is located. Format SET FILE/RU_FACILITY=ru-facility data-filespec[,...] 4 Parameters ru-facility Specifies the number or name of a recoverable facility. It can be an integer from 0 through 255, or it can be the name of a Digital-registered recoverable facility. Facility numbers 1 through 127 are reserved by Digital; facility numbers 128 through 255 are available for user-written recoverable facilities. RMS is recoverable facility 1; specifying the number 1 is equivalent to using the text RMS. The number 0 corresponds to no recoverable facility. Currently, the only Digital-defined recoverable facility is 1 (RMS). The recoverable facility that you specify is an input parameter that is used only to open the file; it does not actually modify any file attributes. data-filespec[,...] Specifies the file that is to be modified. If you specify more than one file, separate the file specifications with commas. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed. The file specification cannot include a node name, since the SET FILE command is not valid for network access. 4 Description The SET FILE/RU_FACILITY command allows you to identify the recoverable facility that controls active recovery units on the file. You can use any other SET FILE qualifier with the /RU_ FACILITY qualifier. When a data file has active recovery units and RMS journaling cannot resolve the recovery units (for example, if the recovery unit journal is unavailable), the data file cannot be opened or deleted. The presence of active recovery units prevents you from unmarking (or marking) a file for any journaling type. With the SET FILE/RU_FACILITY/RU_ACTIVE command, you can clear the designated recoverable facility that controls active recovery units for the data file. CAUTION When you clear the RU_FACILITY attribute (with the command SET FILE/RU_ACTIVE=0/RU_FACILITY=1), the data in the file is likely to be in an inconsistent state. Do not use the data file unless you can ensure that the data is consistent. After clearing the RU_ACTIVE attribute, you can unmark the file for journaling, delete the file, and re-create a consistent file using a backup copy. You can determine the recoverable facility that controls active recovery units (if any) for the file by entering the DCL command DIRECTORY/FULL or DUMP/HEADER. You can use the ANALYZE/RMS_FILE /RU_JOURNAL command to determine the state of any active recovery units. 4 Examples 1.$ SET FILE/RU_FACILITY=1/NORU_JOURNAL/NOAI_JOURNAL/LOG SAVINGS.DAT %SET-I-FILUNMARKAI, $DISK1:[PERSONAL]SAVINGS.DAT;1 unmarked for RMS after-image journaling %SET-I-FILUNMARKRU, $DISK1:[PERSONAL]SAVINGS.DAT;1 unmarked for RMS recovery-unit journaling %SET-I-MODIFIED, $DISK1:[PERSONAL]SAVINGS.DAT;1 modified $ DELETE SAVINGS.DAT;* This example shows the use of the /RU_FACILITY qualifier to allow SET FILE access to a data file. The SET FILE command identifies the recoverable facility holding the file and it also unmarks the file for recovery unit and after-image journaling. After these steps, it is then possible to delete the data file. CAUTION If it becomes necessary to use the /RU_FACILITY qualifier because of active recovery units, the data in the file may be inconsistent. Digital recommends that you not use the data file unless you can verify that the data is consistent. Digital also recommends that you make a new copy of the file using the Convert Utility and that you use the converted copy in place of the original. 2.$ SET FILE/RU_FACILITY=RMS/RU_ACTIVE=0 SALES.DAT In this example, the recoverable facility for the file SALES.DAT is identified as RMS by the /RU_FACILITY=RMS qualifier, and the RU active file attribute (which indicates active RMS recovery units) is cleared by the /RU_ACTIVE=0 qualifier. If the file SALES.DAT is unavailable due to active recovery units and an unavailable recovery unit journal, you can use this command to gain access to the file. As in the previous example, this operation leaves the data file in an inconsistent state. In general, use this command to delete the data file, then restore the file from a backup copy. 3 /RU_JOURNAL The SET FILE/RU_JOURNAL command marks an RMS file for recovery unit journaling. The SET FILE command is not supported for remote files. You must use the SET FILE command from the system where the file is located. Format SET FILE/[NO]RU_JOURNAL[=volume-name] data-filespec[,...] 4 Parameters volume-name Specifies the volume on which the recovery unit journals will be located, using one of the following keywords: o DEVICE=device_name specifies a device name or logical name. o LABEL=volume-label specifies a volume label. By default, recovery unit journals are created temporarily in the [SYSJNL] directory on the same volume as the file that is being journaled. (If such a directory does not exist, RMS journaling creates it automatically.) You can change the device on which the recovery unit journals are created by using either the DEVICE or LABEL keyword. Use the DEVICE keyword to specify the location of recovery unit journals using a device name or a logical name. Use the LABEL keyword to specify the location of recovery unit journals using a volume label. You can only use one of these two keywords (LABEL or DEVICE) to specify the recovery unit journal location. In either case, only the volume label is actually stored with the file. At run time, RMS attempts to translate the logical name DISK$volume_label when creating a recovery unit journal. This is the default logical name created by the Mount Utility when you mount the disk using the /SYSTEM or /CLUSTER qualifier. If you do not mount the disk using the /SYSTEM or /CLUSTER qualifier, you must define the logical name DISK$volume_label using the DEFINE command with the /SYSTEM and /EXECUTIVE_MODE qualifiers. You must have the SYSNAM (system logical name) or the SYSPRV (system privilege) privilege to use the /SYSTEM qualifier. NOTE The logical name DISK$volume_label can point to any disk device on the system that is mounted and has for its volume label an executive-mode logical name in the form DISK$volume_label with the concealed and terminal attributes. data-filespec[,...] Specifies the file that is to be marked for recovery unit journaling. If a data file has been marked for recovery unit journaling with this command, DECdtm transaction services ($START_TRANS, $END_TRANS, and $ABORT_TRANS) must be used by an application program to define transactions whenever data in this file is modified. If you specify more than one file, separate the file specifications with commas. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed. The file specification cannot include a node name, since the SET FILE command is not valid for network access. 4 Description The SET FILE/RU_JOURNAL command marks an RMS file for recovery unit journaling. In order to use recovery unit journaling for a data file, a data file must be marked for recovery unit journaling with the SET FILE/RU_JOURNAL command, and transactions must be defined in an application program using DECdtm transaction services. You can also use this command to specify the default volume on which recovery unit journals will be created for this file. Use the SET FILE/NORU_JOURNAL command to unmark a file for recovery unit journaling. After you use the SET FILE/NORU_JOURNAL command for a file, modifications to that data file will no longer be written to a recovery unit journal. If you wish to delete a file that has been marked for recovery unit journaling, you must use the SET FILE/NORU_JOURNAL command before you can delete the file. There is no reason other than performance to keep recovery unit journals on a different volume from the file being journaled. Unlike after-image journaling, which protects against a system failure such as a head crash that causes a loss of data, recovery unit journaling ensures that a predefined set of operations are either done in their entirety, or not done at all. In the event of an abnormal termination of the application, such as a system crash or a Ctrl/Y, any incomplete transactions are automatically rolled back (undone). Because all recovery unit journals must be available before the data files can be rolled back, locating recovery unit journals on a volume where availability might be low could reduce the availability of the data files that use those recovery unit journals. Specifying a location for recovery unit journals for a file does not guarantee that the recovery unit journals will always be located on the named device or volume. For any active transaction, there is always only one recovery unit journal for local files. Thus, if many files are involved in a transaction, a single recovery unit journal is used, even if different locations for the journals had been specified (for individual files) with different SET FILE/RU_JOURNAL commands. Remote files are an exception to this rule. Each remote file associated with a transaction has its own recovery unit and recovery unit journal. The recovery unit journal resides on the remote system. The volume is chosen in the same way as for local files. Remote files have no effect in determining where the local recovery unit journal resides. A journal is not deleted when the transaction has been completed. Recovery unit journals are automatically deleted only when all of the files involved in the transaction are closed and the application exits. RMS journaling automatically creates a recovery unit journal at run time, whenever the first record stream associates with a transaction. All record streams in the process associated with the same transaction share a single recovery unit journal. Once a recovery unit journal is created, it can be reused for another transaction by the process that created it. A recovery unit journal is created only when there is no available recovery unit journal opened by the process for the current transaction. 4 Examples 1.$ SET FILE/RU_JOURNAL FINANCE_DISK:[PAYROLL]WEEKLY.DAT This command marks the file WEEKLY.DAT for recovery unit journaling. Any operation within an application that modifies this file must be in a defined transaction (defined by DECdtm transaction services). 2.$ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:, CREATE)- _$ /RU_JOURNAL/LOG OVERDUE.DAT %SET-I-JCREATED, journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL;1 created %SET-I-FILMARKAI, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 marked for RMS after-image journaling -SET-I-JFILE, using journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL;1 %SET-I-FILMARKRU, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 marked for RMS recovery-unit journaling %SET-I-MODIFIED, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.DAT;1 modified $ SET FILE/AI_JOURNAL=(FILE=JNL_DISK:OVERDUE)- _$ /RU_JOURNAL/LOG CURRENT.DAT %SET-I-FILMARKAI, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]CURRENT.DAT;1 marked for RMS after-image journaling -SET-I-JFILE, using journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL;1 %SET-I-FILMARKRU, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]CURRENT.DAT;1 marked for RMS recovery-unit journaling %SET-I-MODIFIED, WORK_DISK:[PAYABLE]CURRENT.DAT;1 modified In this example, the files OVERDUE.DAT and CURRENT.DAT are marked for after-image and recovery unit journaling using two SET FILE commands. In this example, a single journal (JNL_ DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL) is used for after-image journaling. The first SET FILE command uses the /CREATE qualifier to create a new after-image journal, JNL_ DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL, for the file OVERDUE.DAT. The file specification uses the current default directory [PAYABLE] and the default file extension RMS$JOURNAL. The second SET FILE command marks the file CURRENT.DAT for after-image and recovery unit journaling, checks the disk JNL_ DISK to see whether an after-image journal already exists, and uses the existing journal JNL_DISK:[PAYABLE]OVERDUE.RMS$JOURNAL for the file CURRENT.DAT. 2 HOST Connects your terminal (through the current host processor) to another processor, called the remote processor. The command requires that: o Both processors must be running DECnet software. o You must have an account on the remote system to log in. o The NETMBX (network mailbox) privilege is set. Format SET HOST node-name 3 Parameter node-name Specifies the node name of the remote processor to which you will connect. 3 Qualifiers /APPLICATION_PROTOCOL /APPLICATION_PROTOCOL[=protocol] Specifies the protocol connection, CTERM (CTDRIVER) or RTERM (RTTDRIVER) on the specified node. CTERM protocol is the default if no connection is specified. /BUFFER_SIZE /BUFFER_SIZE=n Changes the packet size of the protocol message sent between the terminal and the remote processor if a connection to the remote processor is already established. The default buffer size is 1010 bytes; however, the buffer size n can range from 140 bytes to 1024 bytes. The value of the parameter n is reset to 140 bytes if a value below 140 is specified; a value for n above 1024 bytes is reset to 1024. You can force the host node to write to the terminal in smaller packets, thereby ensuring that write operations to the terminal are displayed at more frequent intervals, by setting n to a value just above the minimum of 140 bytes. On slow DECnet links, setting the buffer size to a smaller value may decrease pauses between write operations when large amounts of data are being scrolled to the screen. /LOG /LOG[=filespec] /NOLOG (default) Controls whether a log file of the entire session is kept. If you use the /LOG qualifier without the file specification, the log information is stored in the file SETHOST.LOG. /RESTORE /RESTORE /NORESTORE (default) Saves current terminal characteristics before a remote terminal session is begun and restores them when the remote session is terminated. 3 Examples 1.$ SET HOST/APPLICATION_PROTOCOL=CTERM DAKOTA The /APPLICATION_PROTOCOL qualifier specifies the CTERM protocol (the default) on node DAKOTA in this command line. 2.$ SET HOST ITALIC Username: BROWN Password: <PASSWORD> Welcome to OpenVMS VAX Version 6.1 on node ITALIC . . . $ LOGOUT BROWN logged out at 19-APR-1994 15:04:25.27 %REM-S-END, Control returned to node _CASLON:: In this example, the name of the local node is CASLON. This SET HOST command connects the user terminal to the processor at the network node named ITALIC. The remote processor then prompts for user name and password. Use the normal login procedure to log in to the remote processor. Once you are logged in at a remote node, you can use the SET HOST command to establish communication with another node. After logging in to node ITALIC, you could type SET HOST BODONI. You would again be prompted for a user name and password. If you then supply a valid user name and password, you will be logged in to node BODONI. Note that when you log out of node BODONI, control is returned to node ITALIC. You must log out of node ITALIC to return to your local node, CASLON. 3.$ SET TERMINAL/WIDTH=80 $ SET HOST/RESTORE GENEVA Username: Jones Password: <PASSWORD> $ SET TERMINAL/WIDTH=132 . . . $ logout JONES logged out at 19-APR-1994 11:04:51.45 %REM-S-END, control returned to node _ORACLE This example shows user JONES on node ORACLE logging in to remote node GENEVA and specifies that the original terminal screen width be restored to 80 characters when the remote session is terminated. 3 /DTE Connects your system to a remote system through an outgoing terminal line. You must have an account on the remote system in order to log in to that system after the connection is made. You must also have the ability to assign a channel to the terminal port specified. Your system manager can set the device protection on the terminal port to allow you access. Format SET HOST/DTE terminal-name 4 Parameter terminal-name Specifies the name of an outgoing terminal line, which connects your system directly to another system or modem. 4 Qualifiers /BREAK /BREAK=break-character Selects the break character. The break character is used to generate a break on lines that expect a break rather than a carriage return. To generate a break, press Ctrl/break-character. The break character can be any ASCII character between @ and z, except C, M, Q, S, Y, or the left bracket ([). You cannot select a character currently defined as either the command character (see the description of the /COMMAND=command-character qualifier) or the escape character (see the description of the /ESCAPE=escape-character qualifier). The ASCII characters between @ and z include the alphabetic characters in both upper and lower cases, the at sign (@), the backslash (\), the right bracket (]), the circumflex (^), the underscore (_), and the grave accent (`). By default, the break character is the right bracket (]). /COMMAND /COMMAND=command-character Selects the command character. Use the command character to access DTE command mode by pressing Ctrl/command-character. The command character can be any ASCII character between @ and z, except C, M, Q, S, Y, or the left bracket ([). You cannot select a character currently defined as either the break character (see the description of the /BREAK=break-character qualifier) or the escape character (see the description of the /ESCAPE=escape- character qualifier). The ASCII characters between @ and z include the alphabetic characters in both upper and lower cases, the at sign (@), the backslash (\), the right bracket (]), the circumflex (^), the underscore (_), and the grave accent (`). By default, the command character is the at sign (@). /DIAL /DIAL=(NUMBER:number[,MODEM_TYPE:modem-type]) Allows a modem attached to the outgoing terminal line to be autodialed using the autodial protocol of that modem. The NUMBER keyword is the telephone number to be autodialed and is a required parameter. Before you dial a new number, you must log out of the current remote system. On Alpha, the MODEM_TYPE keyword defaults to DMCL (any modem that uses the DEC Modem Command Language). On VAX, the MODEM_TYPE keyword is optional. It can be used to specify any of the following modem types: o DMCL (any modem that uses the DEC Modem Command Language) o DF03 (default) o DF112 Each modem type requires a specific modem dialer code. Check with your system manager to see which modem dialer codes are installed on your system. In addition, the MODEM_TYPE keyword can be used to specify a modem type other than DF03, DF112, or DMCL. A template is provided for users interested in supporting other modems with autodial capabilities (see SYS$EXAMPLES:DTE_DF03.MAR). /ECHO /ECHO /NOECHO (default) Determines whether the terminal input is echoed by your local system. By default, all echoing is performed by the remote system. /EIGHT_BIT /EIGHT_BIT (default) /NOEIGHT_BIT Determines whether the outgoing terminal line supports 8-bit or 7-bit characters. By default, 8-bit characters are supported. If you specify /NOEIGHT_BIT, then 7-bit characters are supported. /ERROR_ACTION /ERROR_ACTION=CONTINUE (default) /ERROR_ACTION=EXIT Specifies the error action by using the EXIT or the CONTINUE keyword. When an error is detected on the outgoing terminal line, the error is reported to the local system and an error message is displayed on your terminal. If the error action is CONTINUE, then communication with the remote system continues uninterrupted. If the error action is EXIT, then the local system immediately exits from the remote system. /ESCAPE /ESCAPE=escape-character Selects the escape character. You can use the escape character to exit from DTEPAD by pressing Ctrl/ escape-character. The escape character can be any ASCII character between @ and z, except C, M, Q, S, Y, or the left bracket ([). You cannot select a character currently defined as either the break character (see the description of the /BREAK=break-character qualifier) or the command character (see the description of the /COMMAND=command- character qualifier). By default, the escape character is a backslash (\). The ASCII characters between @ and z include the alphabetic characters in both upper and lower cases, the at sign (@), the backslash (\), the right bracket (]), the circumflex (^), the underscore (_), and the grave accent (`). /FLOW_CONTROL /FLOW_CONTROL (default) /NOFLOW_CONTROL Determines whether XON/XOFF flow control is enabled. By default, flow control is enabled. XON/XOFF flow control is a means of preventing data-overrun errors. Incoming data is stored in receive buffers; when these buffers are full, a signal is sent to the remote system to stop transmission. Once there is sufficient space in the receive buffers, another message is sent to restart transmission. You should disable XON/XOFF flow control when the remote system has no XON/XOFF flow control. /INIT /INIT[=filespec] (default) /NOINIT Sets the configurable characteristics of DTEPAD according to values contained in the specified initialization file. If you use qualifiers in the command line to define the values of any of the configurable characteristics, these will supersede the values contained in the initialization file. By default, DTEPAD tries to translate the logical name DTEPAD$INI in order to find the appropriate initialization file. If you use the /INIT qualifier and omit the file specification, DTEPAD translates the logical name DTEPAD$INI and finds the appropriate file. If DTEPAD$INI is not defined, then DTEPAD uses /NOINIT as the default. An initialization file can contain any combination of any of the following DTE commands: o SAVE o SEND BREAK o SET DTE o SPAWN The following is an example of an initialization file: SET DTE/MAX_BUFFERS=150 SET DTE/READ_DELAY=100 SEND BREAK /LOG /LOG[=filespec] /NOLOG (default) Controls whether a log file of the session is kept. If you use the /LOG qualifier and omit the file specification, then the log information is written to the file DTEPAD.LOG. When used to log a modem session, the log file contains any noise that occurred on the phone line. For example, typing a file in order to get it recorded in the log file could result in noise being recorded along with the file data. Therefore, the use of a log file is not recommended for the purpose of file transfers. Digital recommends that you use asynchronous DECnet to transfer files. /MAX_BUFFERS /MAX_BUFFERS=number-buffers Specifies the maximum number of receive buffers. Receive buffers are buffers used to receive incoming data from the modem port. They are allocated as they are required. By default, the maximum number of receive buffers is 100. The minimum number you can specify is 20. /PARITY /PARITY=NONE (default) /PARITY=ODD /PARITY=EVEN Selects parity on the outgoing terminal line. /READ_DELAY /READ_DELAY=delay Specifies the modem port read delay in milliseconds. The modem port read delay is the time interval during which data in the modem port is transferred into receive buffers at the terminal. By default, the modem port read delay is 50 milliseconds. This is also the minimum value. A long modem port read delay slows the rate at which data is displayed at your terminal, and also increases the risk of data- overrun errors; however, a longer read delay requires less CPU overhead. /SPEED /SPEED=(output-rate,input-rate) Sets the baud rate at which the terminal receives and transmits data. If the input and output rates are the same, specify the qualifier as /SPEED=rate. Not all terminals support different input and output baud rates. For specific information on baud rates for your terminal, consult the manual for that terminal. The default transmission rates are installation dependent. The valid baud rates are as follows: 50 150 1800 4800 38400 75 300 2000 7200 57600 110 600 2400 9600 76800 134 1200 3600 19200 115200 If you select an invalid or unsupported speed, then the terminal line speed will remain set at its previous value. 4 Examples 1.$ SET HOST/DTE TTA2:/DIAL=NUMBER:5551234 Username: SMITH Password: This command connects the user terminal to the outgoing terminal line TTA2:, which is attached to a modem (type DF03 by default) set to autodial the phone number 555-1234. The remote processor then prompts for user name and password. Use the normal login procedure to log in to the remote system. 2.$ SET HOST/DTE/DIAL=(NUMBER:5551234#,MODEM_TYPE:DF112) TTA2: Username: SMITH Password: This command accomplishes the same thing as in the first example, except that it uses the DF112 modem. The number sign (#) is required to activate the autodialer in the DF112. 3.$ SET HOST/DTE/NOEIGHTBIT TTA2 This command sets the outgoing terminal port, TTA2, to support 7-bit characters. 4.$ SET HOST/DTE/NOFLOW_CONTROL TTA2 This command disables the XON/XOFF flow control. 5.$ SET HOST/DTE/ERROR_ACTION=EXIT TTA2 This command sets the error action to EXIT. 6.$ SET HOST/DTE/MAX_BUFFERS=150 TTA2 This command sets the maximum number of receive buffers to 150. 7.$ SET HOST/DTE/ESCAPE=E TTA2 This command defines the letter E as the escape character. Note that DTEPAD is not case sensitive. 8.$ SET HOST/DTE/LOG TTA2 This command enables logging of the session. Since no log file is specified, the log is written to the default log file, DTEPAD.LOG. 9.$ SET HOST/DTE/INIT=MYFILE.INI TTA2 This command uses the initialization file MYFILE.INI. 10$ <Ctrl/@> DTEPAD> This example shows you how to access DTE command mode by pressing Ctrl/@, where @ is the command character. 11DTEPAD> SAVE MYFILE.INI This command saves the information on the current configuration in the file MYFILE.INI. 12DTEPAD> SET DTE/BREAK=G This command defines the letter G as the break character. 13DTEPAD> SET DTE/ECHO This command sets the terminal port so that echoing is performed by the local system. 14DTEPAD> SET DTE/SPEED=4800 This command sets the input and output baud rates to 4800. 15DTEPAD> SET DTE/LOG=myfile.log This command directs logging to the file MYFILE.LOG. 16DTEPAD> SHOW DTE Port TXA0 EIGHT_BIT ECHO Flow control XON/XOFF Parity NONE Transmit Speed 4800 Receive Speed 4800 Error action CONTINUE Break character B Escape character \ Command character @ Maximum buffers 100 Read delay 50 milliseconds Log file MYFILE.INI Number dialed 12345678 Modem type DF03 Bytes transmitted 75 Bytes received 132 Errors 0 This command displays all the current settings of the configurable characteristics, the number of bytes transmitted and received, and the number of errors detected. 3 /DUP Connects your terminal to a storage controller through the appropriate bus for that controller. The /SERVER and /TASK qualifiers are required. For use only with storage controllers. Requires the DIAGNOSE privilege. Format SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=server-name /TASK=task-name node-name 4 Parameter node-name Specifies the node name of the storage controller. 4 Qualifiers /LOG /LOG[=filespec] /NOLOG (default) Controls whether a log file of the entire session is kept. If you use the /LOG qualifier without the file specification, the log information is stored in the file HSCPAD.LOG. /SERVER /SERVER=server-name Specifies the server name for the target storage controller. This qualifier is required. /TASK /TASK=task-name Specifies the utility or diagnostic name to be executed on the target storage controller under direction of the server. This qualifier is required. 4 Example $ SET HOST/DUP/SERVER=MSCP$DUP/TASK=DIRECT R2DH5Y %HSCPAD-I-LOCPROGEXE, Local program executing - type ^\ to exit utility The SET HOST/DUP command in this example connects the user terminal to the utility program called DIRECT executing on a storage controller named R2DH5Y under direction of the MSCP$DUP server. 3 /HSC Connects your terminal to an HSC disk and tape controller through the computer interconnect (CI) bus. Used only with HSCs. Requires the DIAGNOSE privilege. Format SET HOST/HSC node-name 4 Parameter node-name Specifies the node name of the HSC. 4 Qualifier /LOG /LOG[=filespec] /NOLOG (default) Controls whether a log file of the entire session is kept. If you use the /LOG qualifier without the file specification, the log information is stored in the file HSCPAD.LOG. 4 Example $ SET HOST/HSC HSC001 %HSCPAD-I-LOCPROGEXE, Local program executing - type ^\ to exit, ^Y for prompt HSC> This SET HOST/HSC command connects the user terminal to the HSC named HSC001. 3 /LAT Connects your terminal to a specified service available on the local area network (LAN), establishing one session for communication between your terminal and that service. The service node that provides the service must be on a remote node, must be on the same extended LAN, and must be running at least Version 5.0 of the LAT protocol. Format SET HOST/LAT service-name 4 Parameter service-name Specifies the name of the service to which you want your terminal connected. A service is a resource on the LAN. A service often consists of all of the resources of a computer system. Other examples of services are a file storage system and an application program running on a computer system. A computer system that offers one or more services is called a service node. If several service nodes offer the same service, and you do not specify the /NODE=node-name qualifier, your terminal connects to the service node that is the least busy. To display a list of services on your LAN, use the LAT Control Program (LATCP) SHOW SERVICES command. See the OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual. 4 Qualifiers /AUTOCONNECT /AUTOCONNECT /NOAUTOCONNECT Specifies whether connection attempts should be retried automatically when a connection fails because a service is unknown or unavailable, or because a node is unknown or unreachable. Also specifies that reconnects should be attempted automatically if a service has disconnected abnormally. The default is /NOAUTOCONNECT. /AUTOPROMPT /AUTOPROMPT (default) /NOAUTOPROMPT Causes an OpenVMS Username: prompt to appear with no user action when a SET HOST/LAT command is issued. On a terminal server port, you can configure the port to have AUTOPROMPT disabled (/NOAUTOPROMPT) so that you are required to press Return when connecting to a node to get the Username: prompt. However, when connecting to a reverse LAT service, the AUTOPROMPT characteristic should be disabled. /BREAK /BREAK=break-character Defines a character that generates a break on lines that expect a break rather than a carriage return. To generate a break, press the Ctrl and break-character keys together. The default break- character value is the tilde (~). You can select any ASCII character between @ and Z, except C, M, Q, S, Y, and the left bracket ([). You cannot select a character that is already defined as the disconnect character. /DESTINATION_PORT /DESTINATION_PORT=port-name Specifies the port on a node to which you want to connect. The /NODE qualifier is required when you specify the /DESTINATION_ PORT qualifier. The port must be available and must offer the service you specify. OpenVMS and certain other LAT service node systems ignore the /DESTINATION_PORT qualifier. /DIAL /DIAL=(NUMBER:number[,MODEM_TYPE:modem-type]) Allows a modem attached to the outgoing terminal line to be autodialed using the autodial protocol of that modem. The NUMBER keyword is the telephone number to be autodialed and is a required parameter. The MODEM_TYPE keyword is optional. It can be used to specify any of the following modem types: o DMCL (any modem that uses the DEC Modem Command Language) o DF03 (default) o DF112 Each modem type requires a specific modem dialer code. Check with your system manager to see which modem dialer codes are installed on your system. In addition, the MODEM_TYPE keyword can be used to specify a modem type other than DF03, DF112, or DMCL. A template is provided for users interested in supporting other modems with autodial capabilities (see SYS$EXAMPLES:DTE_DF03.MAR). /DISCONNECT /DISCONNECT=disconnect-character Defines the character that you can use to disconnect from a remote session. To generate a disconnect, press the Ctrl and disconnect-character keys together. The default disconnect- character is the backslash (\). You can select any ASCII character from @ through Z, except C, M, Q, S, Y, and the left bracket ([). For example, if you specify /DISCONNECT=A, Ctrl/A will be the disconnect character. You cannot select a character that is already defined as the break character. /EIGHT_BIT /EIGHT_BIT (default) /NOEIGHT_BIT Determines whether the outgoing terminal line supports 8-bit or 7-bit characters. By default, 8-bit characters are supported. If you specify /NOEIGHT_BIT, then 7-bit characters are supported. NOTE To change the number of bits per character on the remote terminal server port, that port must have the REMOTE MODIFICATION characteristic enabled. /FRAME /FRAME=n The /FRAME=n qualifier allows a user making a LAT connection to a remote system to specify the number of data bits that the terminal driver expects for every character that is input or output. The value of n can be from 5 to 8. The default value depends on the settings for the terminal established by the /PARITY and /EIGHT_BIT qualifiers. The following example specifies a character frame size of 7 bits per character: $ SET HOST/LAT /FRAME=7 DIAL_OUT_SVC /LOG /LOG[=log-file] Logs all data that is delivered during the LAT session. If you do not specify a log file, the data is stored in the file SETHOST_ LAT.LOG. /NODE /NODE=node-name Specifies the node that offers the service to which you want to connect. The node you specify must be a remote node. Failover is not performed if the connection fails. /PASSWORD /PASSWORD=password Specifies the password required by a service that is password protected. If you do not specify the /PASSWORD qualifier when requesting a connection to a password-protected service, you are prompted for a password. /QUEUE /QUEUE /NOQUEUE (default) When connecting to a reverse LAT service that is already in use (such as a dial out modem), you are notified that the service is in use and the SET HOST/LAT command terminates. However, LAT can allow incoming connections to be queued to any reverse LAT service that supports service queueing, which enables users to be placed on a queue when using reverse LAT services. LAT reports your position in the queue. When the resource becomes available, you are immediately notified. You can cancel the queued connection by pressing Ctrl/Y and terminating the SET HOST /LAT command. /SPEED /SPEED=(output-rate,input-rate) Sets the baud rate at which the terminal receives and transmits data. If the input and output rates are the same, specify the qualifier as /SPEED=rate. Not all terminals support different input and output baud rates. For specific information on baud rates for your terminal, consult the manual for that terminal. The default transmission rates are installation dependent. The valid values for input and output baud rates are as follows: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600 If you select an invalid or unsupported speed, the terminal line speed will remain set at its previous value. NOTE To change the speed on the terminal server port, the REMOTE MODIFICATION characteristic must be enabled on that terminal server port. When initiating a connection, SET HOST/LAT may attempt to set terminal server port characteristics, such as the speed and the default speed for a LAT device. If the device connected to the terminal server port has a fixed speed (such as a dial-out modem) and you do not want the host to try to change this, disable the REMOTE MODIFICATION characteristic on that port using the following command: Local> DEFINE PORT x REMOTE MODIFICATION DISABLE Local> LOGOUT PORT x Use the following command for terminal servers that support the CHANGE command: Local> CHANGE PORT x REMOTE MODIFICATION DISABLE 4 Examples 1.$ SET HOST/LAT SORTER %LAT-S-CONNECTED, session to SORTER established %LAT-I-TODISCON, type ^\ to disconnect the session Username: SMITH Password: . . . $ LOGOUT SMITH logged out at 30-DEC-1994 11:04:51.45 %LAT-I-DISCONNECTED, session disconnected from SORTER -LAT-I-END, control returned to node HOME $ This SET HOST/LAT command connects the user to the service SORTER, which is a computer system. The first message confirms that the user has been connected to that service. The second message informs the user how to disconnect the session. (The user can also disconnect the session by logging out from SORTER.) SORTER then prompts for the username and password. Use the normal login procedure to log in to the system. When the user logs out of the service SORTER, the terminal displays the DCL command prompt of the user's local processor system (HOME). 2.$ SET HOST/LAT/DESTINATION_PORT=BOSTON- _$ /NODE=STATE/DISCONNECT=F BUDGET This command connects the user's terminal to the service BUDGET that is offered on port BOSTON, on service node STATE. The user can disconnect the session by typing Ctrl/F. 3.$ SET HOST/LAT PURSE Password: This command attempts to connect the user's terminal to the service PURSE. The service PURSE is password protected, so the user is prompted for a password. The user could have specified the password within the SET HOST/LAT command, as shown in the next example. 4.$ SET HOST/LAT/PASSWORD=BEOR PURSE This command connects the user's terminal to the password- protected service PURSE. The password is BEOR. 3 /RLOGIN Allows you to log in to a remote host over a TCP/IP connection and start an interactive terminal session by accessing the RLOGIN application. Format { IPhostname } SET HOST/RLOGIN { IPaddress } { } NOTE You can specify the IPhostname or the IPaddress, but not both. 4 Parameter IPhostname Specifies the IP host name of the remote host. IPaddress Specifies an IP address of the remote host. 4 Qualifiers /AUTHENTICATE Specifies that Kerberos authentication should be used for acquiring access to the remote node. /PASSWORD /PASSWORD=password Optional qualifier that specifies the password of the user logging in to the remote host. /TERMINAL_TYPE /TERMINAL_TYPE=type Sets the terminal emulator to one of the following terminal types: VT100, VT200, VT300, VT400, VT500. /TRUNCATE_USERNAME Specifies that the current user name should be truncated to 8 characters before attempting to connect to the remote node. The qualifier is required for communication with systems that limit the size of their login names to 8 characters. The /TRUNCATE_ USERNAME qualifier is ignored if /USERNAME is specified. /USERNAME /USERNAME=username Specifies the user name for logging in to the remote node. The user name can be enclosed in quotes to preserve the case of the user name for case-sensitive systems such as UNIX systems. If the /USERNAME qualifier is not specified, the default is the current user's user name. 4 Example $ SET HOST/RLOGIN remotehst1 This example creates an RLOGIN connection to remote host remotehst1 over a TCP/IP connection. 3 /TELNET Connects you to a remote host over a TCP/IP connection by invoking the TELNET application. Format { IPhostname } SET HOST/TELNET { IPaddress } { } NOTE You can specify the IPhostname or the IPaddress, but not both. 4 Parameter IPhostname Specifies the IP host name of the remote host. IPaddress Specifies an IP address of the remote host. 4 Qualifiers /AUTHENTICATE Specifies that Kerberos authentication should be used for acquiring access to the remote node. /PORT /PORT=port Specifies the remote TCP port to use. The default is 23. /TERMINAL_TYPE /TERMINAL_TYPE=type Sets the terminal emulator to one of the following terminal types: VT100, VT200, VT300, VT400, VT500. 4 Example $ SET HOST/TELNET remotehst2 This example creates a TELNET connection to remote host remotehst2 over a TCP/IP connection. 3 /TN3270 Connects you to a remote IBM host over a TCP/IP connection, causing the local keyboard to emulate an IBM 3279-class terminal keyboard by invoking the TN3270 terminal emulator. Format { IPhostname } SET HOST/TN3270 { IPaddress } { } NOTE You can specify the IPhostname or the IPaddress, but not both. 4 Parameter IPhostname Specifies the IP host name of the remote host. IPaddress Specifies an IP address of the remote host. 4 Qualifiers /AUTHENTICATE Specifies that Kerberos authentication should be used for acquiring access to the remote node. /PORT /PORT=port Specifies the remote TCP port to use. The default is 23. /TERMINAL_TYPE Sets the terminal emulator to one of the following terminal types: VT100, VT200, VT300, VT400, VT500. 4 Example $ SET HOST/TN3270 remotehst3 This example creates a connection to a TELNET server on the remote IBM system remotehst3 over a TCP/IP connection. 2 KEY Sets and locks the key definition state for keys defined with the DEFINE/KEY command. Format SET KEY 3 Qualifiers /LOG /LOG (default) /NOLOG Controls whether the system displays a message indicating that the key state has been set. /STATE /STATE=state-name /NOSTATE Specifies the name of the state. The state name can be any alphanumeric string. If you omit the /STATE qualifier or use the /NOSTATE qualifier, the current state is left unchanged. The default state is DEFAULT. 3 Example $ SET KEY /STATE=EDITING The SET KEY command in this example sets the key state to the state EDITING. You can now use the key definitions that were defined for the state EDITING. 2 LOGINS Sets the interactive limit (number of interactive users allowed on the system), or displays the interactive limit and the current number of interactive users. Requires OPER (operator) privilege to set the login limit. Format SET LOGINS 3 Qualifier /INTERACTIVE /INTERACTIVE[=n] Establishes the number of interactive users allowed to gain access to the system. If the parameter n is specified, the interactive limit is set to the value n. If the parameter n is not specified, the SET LOGINS command displays the current interactive limit and the number of interactive users. 3 Examples 1.$ SET LOGINS/INTERACTIVE=5 %SET-I-INTSET, login interactive limit=5, current interactive value=3 In this example, the SET LOGINS command specifies that only five interactive users can be logged in to the system. 2.$ SET LOGINS/INTERACTIVE %SET-I-INTSET, login interactive limit=9, current interactive value=6 When the SET LOGINS command is entered without a parameter, as shown in this example, the /INTERACTIVE qualifier requests that the current status of the login quotas be displayed. The message returned indicates that the maximum number of interactive users allowed on the system is 9 and that the number of interactive users currently logged in is 6. No change is made. 2 MAGTAPE Defines the default characteristics associated with a specific magnetic tape device for subsequent file operations. The SET MAGTAPE command is valid for magnetic tape devices mounted with foreign volumes. Format SET MAGTAPE device-name[:] 3 Parameter device-name[:] Specifies the name of the magnetic tape device for which the characteristics are to be set. The device must not be currently allocated to any other user. 3 Qualifiers /DENSITY /DENSITY=density Specifies the default density, in bits per inch (bpi), for all write operations on the magnetic tape device when the volume is mounted as a foreign tape or as an unlabeled tape. The density can be specified as 800, 1600, or 6250, if supported by the magnetic tape drive. /END_OF_FILE Writes a tape mark at the current position on the magnetic tape volume. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG Displays information about the operations performed on the magnetic tape volume. /LOGSOFT /LOGSOFT (default) /NOLOGSOFT Controls whether soft errors on the specified device are to be logged in the error log file. Soft errors are errors corrected by the hardware without software intervention. This qualifier affects only devices that support hardware error correction, such as the TU78 magnetic tape drive. When used with other devices, this qualifier has no effect. /MEDIA_FORMAT /MEDIA_FORMAT=[NO]COMPACTION Controls whether data records are automatically compacted and blocked together on a TA90E tape drive. Data compaction and record blocking increase the amount of data that can be stored on a single tape cartridge. Note that once data compaction or noncompaction has been selected for a given cartridge, that same status applies to the entire cartridge. /RETENSION Moves a TZK10 tape cartridge to the end of the tape, and then back to the beginning of the tape. Use the /RETENSION qualifier on a regular basis to help maintain the integrity of TZK10 tape cartridges. The /RETENSION qualifier must be used in conjunction with the /REWIND or /UNLOAD qualifier. The /RETENSION qualifier completes its action before /REWIND or /UNLOAD. Use /RETENSION/REWIND when you want the tape cartridge to remain loaded in the drive. Use /RETENSION/UNLOAD when you want to unload the tape cartridge after the retension operation. This qualifier only affects TZK10 tape cartridge drives and has no effect on non-SCSI drives. /REWIND Requests that the volume on the specified device be rewound to the beginning of the magnetic tape. /SKIP /SKIP=option Requests that the magnetic tape volume be positioned according to any of the following options: BLOCK:n Skips the specified number of blocks. END_OF_TAPE Positions the volume at the end-of-tape (EOT) mark. FILES:n Skips the specified number of tape marks (not files). The tape is positioned just past the nth tape mark. If n is negative, the tape is still positioned after the nth tape mark, not before it. If the tape is already positioned immediately after a tape mark, a skip of -1 results in no net movement. (The tape moves to the preceding mark, but is then repositioned to the end of the mark, where it began.) For more information on tape marks and files, see the OpenVMS System Manager's Manual. RECORD:n Skips the specified number of records up to 32767. /UNLOAD Requests that the volume on the specified device be rewound and unloaded. 3 Examples 1.$ MOUNT MTB1:/FOREIGN $ SET MAGTAPE MTB1: /DENSITY=800 The MOUNT command in this example mounts a foreign tape on the device MTB1. The SET MAGTAPE command defines the density for writing the magnetic tape at 800 bpi. 2.$ MOUNT MTA0:/FOREIGN $ SET MAGTAPE MTA0:/SKIP=FILES:4 The MOUNT command in this example mounts a foreign tape on the device MTA0; the SET MAGTAPE command directs the magnetic tape position to skip four files. 2 MESSAGE Sets the format for system messages or specifies a process level message file. Lets you override or supplement the system messages. Format SET MESSAGE [filespec] 3 Parameter filespec Specifies the name of the process level message file. Messages in this file supersede messages for the same conditions in the system message file or in an existing process message file. The file type defaults to .EXE. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are not allowed. If you do not specify this parameter, the qualifiers apply to the system message file. 3 Qualifiers /DELETE Removes any process-permanent message files currently in effect. Do not specify the filespec parameter with the /DELETE qualifier. /FACILITY /FACILITY (default) /NOFACILITY Formats messages so that the facility name prefix appears. /IDENTIFICATION /IDENTIFICATION (default) /NOIDENTIFICATION Formats messages so that the message identification prefix appears. /SEVERITY /SEVERITY (default) /NOSEVERITY Formats messages so that the severity level appears. /TEXT /TEXT (default) /NOTEXT Formats messages so that the message text appears. 3 Examples 1.$ TYPE XXX %TYPE-W-OPENIN, error opening DB1:[MALCOLM]XXX.LIS; as input -RMS-E-FNF, file not found . . . $ SET MESSAGE/NOIDENTIFICATION . . . $ TYPE XXX %TYPE-W, error opening DB1:[MALCOLM]XXX.LIS; as input -RMS-E, file not found When the first TYPE command is entered in this example, the error messages include all fields. Later, the SET MESSAGE command establishes that the IDENT portion (the abbreviation for the message text) is omitted in future messages. 2.$ SET MESSAGE NEWMSG The SET MESSAGE command in this example specifies that the message text in NEWMSG.EXE supplements the existing system messages. 2 NETWORK Registers the attributes of a network service. Requires SYSNAM (system name) privilege. Format SET NETWORK network-service 3 Parameter network-service Specifies the name of a network service. 3 Qualifiers /ADDRESS /ADDRESS=address[es] Specifies the network address of the local node. /CONNECTIONS /CONNECTIONS= Specifies a command to be executed to display the number of network connections. /COUNTERS /COUNTERS= Specifies a command to be executed to display the number of network counters. /DATA /DATA= Specifies a character string provided by the network service vendor. /INTERFACE /INTERFACE= Specifies the OpenVMS driver for the network service. /MANUFACTURER /MANUFACTURER= Specifies the manufacturer of the network service. /NETWORK_TYPE /NETWORK_TYPE= Specifies the protocol for the network service. /NODE /NODE= Specifies the name of the local node. /PPPD_CALLOUT /PPPD_CALLOUT=image-name Specifies the name of the protected shareable image activated by PPPD. This image contains the routine PPPD$OPEN_CONNECT, which notifies the network service that a new physical transport exists that supports PPP. If the image resides in the SYS$SHARE directory, enter the file name of the image without the suffix (such as, PPPD_CALLOUT instead of PPPD_CALLOUT.EXE). Otherwise, enter the system logical that identifies the location of the image. /REGISTER Defines a new network service. /REMOVE Deletes a network service from the database. /START /START= Specifies an image to be executed when you issue the START /NETWORK command for the network service. /STATUS /STATUS= Specifies a command to be executed to display additional status information. /STOP /STOP= Specifies an image to be executed when you issue the STOP/NETWORK command for the network service. /UPDATE Allows you to modify the specified data for the network service. 3 Examples 1.$ SET NETWORK DECnet/OSI - /MANUFACTURER= "Digital Equipment Corporation" /NODE="GALAXY" /ADDRESS="19.129" /NETWORK_TYPE="DNA V" /INTERFACE="net 0" /DATA="Router: No" /STATUS="mcr ncl show node 0 all" /CONNECTIONS="mcr ncl show node 0 session control port * all" /COUNTERS="mcr ncl show node 0 session control all counters" /START="@sys$startup:net$startup" /STOP="@sys$manager:net$shutdown") This command adds the network service DECnet-Plus (Phase V) to the database, with the specified characteristics. 2.$ SET NETWORK TCP/IP /REGISTER- /MANUFACTURER="Digital Equipment Corporation" /NODE="ipv6.ucx.mars.univers.com" /ADDRESS="16.20.207.92" /NETWORK_TYPE="TCPIP" /STATUS="ucx show service" /CONNECTIONS="ucx show device" /PPPD_CALLOUT="ucx$pppd_callout" This command creates a new TCP/IP network service, adds it to the database, and enables the PPPD utility by supplying a logical that identifies the location of the shareable image. 2 ON Enables error checking by the command interpreter after the execution of each command in a command procedure. Specify SET NOON to disable error checking. Format SET [NO]ON 3 Example $ SET NOON $ DELETE *.SAV;* $ SET ON $ COPY *.OBJ *.SAV This command procedure routinely copies all object modules into new files with the file type .SAV. The DELETE command first deletes all existing files with the .SAV file type, if any. The SET NOON command ensures that the procedure continues executing even if there are no files with the .SAV file type in the current directory. Following the DELETE command, the SET ON command restores error checking. Then the COPY command makes copies of all existing files with .OBJ file type. 2 OUTPUT_RATE Sets the rate at which output is written to a batch job log file. For use only within command procedures that are submitted as batch or detached jobs. Format SET OUTPUT_RATE[=delta-time] 3 Parameter delta-time The time interval at which output is written from the output buffer to the batch job log file. If no delta time is specified, the information is written in the output buffer to the log file, but the output rate is not changed from the default of once per minute. Specify delta-time as [dddd-][hh:mm:ss.cc]. For more information on delta time, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. 3 Example $ SET OUTPUT_RATE=:0:30 . . . This command, when executed within a batch job, changes the default output rate from once a minute to once every 30 seconds. 2 PASSWORD Changes a password or system password. Also, can establish a secondary password or system password, or remove a secondary password. See the qualifier descriptions for restrictions. Format SET PASSWORD 3 Qualifiers /GENERATE /GENERATE[=value] Generates a list of five random passwords. Press the Return key to repeat the procedure until a suitable password appears. Value is a number from 1 to 10 that restricts the length of the password. For any value n, the SET PASSWORD command generates passwords of from n to (n+2) characters long. If no value is specified, SET PASSWORD uses a default value of 6, and generates passwords from 6 to 8 characters long. Values greater than 10 are not accepted and produce errors. If your system manager has established a minimum password length for your account, SET PASSWORD/GENERATE=n compares that length with the optional value specified with the /GENERATE qualifier, and uses the larger of the two values. If you do not specify a value with the /GENERATE qualifier, the account minimum length is used. NOTE The VMS$PASSWORD_DICTIONARY logical must point to a valid dictionary file for the SET PASSWORD/GENERATE command to work properly. /SECONDARY Creates or allows you to replace a secondary password. The procedure is the same as setting your primary password. Once a secondary password has been established, you will receive two PASSWORD: prompts when logging in. The primary password should be typed in first, followed by the secondary password. Secondary passwords make it possible to set up an account that requires two different people to access it. Each person knows one of the two passwords, and both passwords are required to log in successfully. To remove your secondary password, press the Return key when SET PASSWORD/SECONDARY prompts you for a new password and verification. After you do this, you will receive a single PASSWORD: prompt when logging in. If you remove the secondary password, your system manager must restore it. The /SECONDARY and /SYSTEM qualifiers are incompatible. /SYSTEM Requires both SECURITY and CMKRNL (change mode to kernel) privileges. Changes the system password, rather than a user password. If a terminal line has the system password (SYSPWD) characteristic set, no terminal prompts are sent to that terminal until the system password is entered. A system password is valid only for the node it is set on. In an OpenVMS Cluster, each node can have a different system password. The /SYSTEM and /SECONDARY qualifiers are incompatible. For more information about the use of system passwords, see the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. 3 Example $ SET PASSWORD Old password: HONCHO New password: BIG_ENCHILADA Verification: BIG_ENCHILADA In response to the SET PASSWORD command, the system first prompts for the old password and then for the new password. The system then prompts again for the new password to verify it. The password changes if the user is authorized to change this account's password, if the old password is given correctly, and if the new password is given identically twice. Otherwise, an error message appears and the password remains unchanged. In a real session, neither the old password nor the new password and its verification appear on the screen or paper. 2 PREFIX Allows you to set a prefix control string for verified command lines. Format SET [NO]PREFIX string 3 Parameter string Specifies the FAO control string to be used in generating a prefix to a verified command line. The following rules apply: o No more than 64 characters are allowed in the control string. o The resulting string can be no longer than 64 characters. o Basic formatting FAO directives can be used ("!/", "!_", "!^", "!!", "!%F", and "!n*c"). o Time and date FAO directives can be used ("!%T" and "!%D"). o Repeat counts can be used ("!n(DD)"). o Output field length specifications can be used ("!lengthDD"). o Combination of repeat count and output field length can be used ("!n(lengthDD)"). o FAO directives that require arguments will always receive a value of zero. 3 Example $ SET VERIFY $ @TEST $ SET DEFAULT SYS$LOGIN $ SHOW DEFAULT USER$:[SMYTHE] $ SET PREFIX "(!5%T) " $ @TEST (17:52) $ SET DEFAULT SYS$LOGIN (17:52) $ SHOW DEFAULT USER$:[SMYTHE] This example demonstrates the difference between having and not having a prefix for verification. The first command turns on verification. (Verification must be turned on to see the prefix.) The second command invokes a test procedure to show what the output looks like without a prefix. The third and fourth lines reflect the contents of the test procedure invoked in the preceding command. The third command sets the prefix to an FAO control string so that the first five characters of the standard time will be shown for each command. The last command invokes the test procedure again to demonstrate what the output looks like with a prefix. 2 PRINTER Establishes the characteristics of a specific line printer. The default values listed for qualifiers to the SET PRINTER command are the defaults for an initially bootstrapped system. Requires OPER (operator) privilege. If the printer is a spooled device, LOG_IO (logical I/O) privilege is required to modify its characteristics. Format SET PRINTER printer-name[:] 3 Parameter printer-name[:] Specifies the name of a line printer to set or modify its characteristics. 3 Qualifiers /CR /CR /NOCR (default) Controls whether the printer driver outputs a carriage return character. Use this qualifier for printers on which line feeds do not imply carriage returns. Specify the /NOCR qualifier for printers where the line feed, form feed, vertical feed, and carriage return characters empty the printer buffer. The /NOCR qualifier causes carriage return characters to be held back and output only if the next character is not a form feed or vertical tab. Carriage return characters are always output on devices that have the carriage return function characteristic set. /FALLBACK /FALLBACK /NOFALLBACK (default) Determines whether the printer attempts to translate characters belonging to the DEC Multinational character set into 7-bit equivalent representations. If a character cannot be translated, an underscore (_) character is substituted. If the /PASSALL qualifier is in effect, it has precedence over the /FALLBACK qualifier. /FF /FF (default) /NOFF Indicates whether the printer performs a mechanical form feed. Use the /NOFF qualifier when the printer does not automatically perform mechanical form feeds. This qualifier allows the driver to convert form feeds into multiple line feeds and to output them. /LA11 Specifies the printer as an LA11. This qualifier provides information for the SHOW PRINTER command, which, in turn, provides the user with information about specific printers. If no printer type is specified, LP11 is assumed. /LA180 Specifies the printer as an LA180. This qualifier provides information for the SHOW PRINTER command, which, in turn, provides the user with information about specific printers. If no printer type is specified, LP11 is assumed. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Determines whether information confirming the printer setting is displayed at the terminal from which the SET PRINTER command was entered. /LOWERCASE /LOWERCASE /NOLOWERCASE Indicates whether the printer prints both uppercase and lowercase letters or only uppercase. When the operator specifies the /NOLOWERCASE qualifier, all letters are translated to uppercase. The /[NO]LOWERCASE and /[NO]UPPERCASE qualifiers are complementary; that is, the /LOWERCASE qualifier is equivalent to the /NOUPPERCASE qualifier, and the /NOLOWERCASE qualifier is equivalent to the /UPPERCASE qualifier. /LP11 /LP11 (default) Specifies the printer as an LP11. This qualifier provides information for the SHOW PRINTER command, which, in turn, provides the user with information about specific printers. LP11 is the default printer type. /PAGE /PAGE=lines-per-page Establishes the number of lines per page on the currently installed form; the number of lines can range from 1 to 255 and defaults to 64. The printer driver uses this value to determine the number of line feeds that must be entered to simulate a form feed. /PASSALL /PASSALL /NOPASSALL (default) Controls whether the system interprets special characters or passes them as 8-bit binary data. If you specify the /PASSALL qualifier, the printer driver does not expand tab characters to spaces, fill carriage return or line feed characters, or recognize control characters. /PRINTALL /PRINTALL /NOPRINTALL (default) Controls whether the line printer driver outputs printable 8-bit multinational characters. /TAB /TAB /NOTAB (default) Controls how the printer handles TAB characters. The /NOTAB qualifier expands all tab characters to spaces and assumes tab stops at 8-character intervals. Use the /TAB qualifier when you do not want the system to convert tabs to spaces, but want the printer to process the tab characters. The OpenVMS system requires that printers expand tabs at 8-character intervals. /TRUNCATE /TRUNCATE (default) /NOTRUNCATE Controls whether the printer truncates data exceeding the value specified by the /WIDTH qualifier. Note that the /TRUNCATE and /WRAP qualifiers are incompatible. /UNKNOWN Specifies the printer as nonstandard. This qualifier provides information for the SHOW PRINTER command, which, in turn, provides the user with information about specific printers. If no printer type qualifier is specified, LP11 is assumed. /UPPERCASE /UPPERCASE /NOUPPERCASE Indicates whether the printer prints both uppercase and lowercase letters or only uppercase ones. When you specify the /UPPERCASE qualifier, all letters are translated to uppercase. The /[NO]UPPERCASE and /[NO]LOWERCASE qualifiers are complementary; that is, the /UPPERCASE qualifier is equivalent to the /NOLOWERCASE qualifier, and the /NOUPPERCASE qualifier is equivalent to the /LOWERCASE qualifier. /WIDTH /WIDTH=n Establishes the number of characters per output line on currently installed forms. The width, n, can range from 0 to 65535 for LP11 controllers, and from 0 to 255 for DMF32 controllers. The default value is 132 characters per line. /WRAP /WRAP /NOWRAP (default) Controls whether the printer generates a carriage return and a line feed when it reaches the end of a line. If the /NOWRAP qualifier is specified, the printer writes characters out in the last position on the line. If the /WRAP qualifier is specified, the terminal generates a carriage return and a line feed whenever the end of a line is reached. Note that the /TRUNCATE and /WRAP qualifiers are incompatible. 3 Examples 1.$ SET PRINTER/PAGE=60/WIDTH=80 LPA0: The SET PRINTER command in this example establishes the size of an output page as 60 lines and the width of a line as 80 characters for printer LPA0. 2.$ SET PRINTER/LA11 LPB0: The SET PRINTER command in this example establishes the line printer LPB0 as an LA11 printer. 3.$ SET PRINTER/LOWERCASE LPA0: The SET PRINTER command in this example requests that lowercase printing be enabled on line printer LPA0. 2 PROCESS Changes the execution characteristics associated with the specified process or kernel thread for the current terminal session or job. If no process is specified, changes are made to the current process. Requires GROUP privilege to change other processes in the same group. Requires WORLD privilege to change processes outside your group. Format SET PROCESS [process-name] 3 Parameter process-name Requires that you own the process or that you have GROUP privilege and that the process is in your group. Specifies the name of the process for which the characteristics are to be changed. Process names can be up to 23 alphanumeric characters long in the following format: [node-name::]process-name o The node name can have as many as 6 alphanumeric characters. o The colons (:) count for 2 characters. o The process name can have as many as 15 characters. A local process name can look like a remote process name. Therefore, if you specify ATHENS::SMITH, the system checks for a process named ATHENS::SMITH on the local node before checking node ATHENS for a process named SMITH. The default process is the current process. Process names are unique only within a particular UIC group. You cannot specify the process name for a process outside of your group. To change the characteristics of a process outside of your group, you must use the qualifier /IDENTIFICATION=pid. The process name parameter is ignored. If you include neither the process name nor the /IDENTIFICATION qualifier, the current process is assumed. 3 Qualifiers /AFFINITY /AFFINITY /NOAFFINITY Allows bits in the kernel thread affinity mask to be set or cleared individually, in groups, or all at once. This qualifier is mutually exclusive with the /CAPABILITY qualifier. NOTE The SET PROCESS/[NO]AFFINITY command will fail if none of the specified CPUs has the capabilities required by the process. The /NOAFFINITY qualifier clears all affinity bits currently set in the current or permanent affinity masks, based on the setting of the /PERMANENT qualifier. Specifying the /AFFINITY qualifier has no direct effect, but merely indicates the target of the operations specified by the following secondary parameters: Sets affinity for currently active CPUs defined by the /SET=(n[,..CPU IDs n, where n has the range of 0 to 31. Clears affinity for currently active CPUs defined by /CLEAR=(n[,the]position values n, where n has the range of 0 to 31. Performs the operation on the permanent affinity /PERMANENT mask as well as the current affinity mask, making the changes valid for the life of the kernel thread. (The default behavior is to affect only the affinity mask for the running image.) The secondary qualifiers can all be used at once as long as the affinity bits defined in the /SET and /CLEAR parameters do not overlap. The privileges required to execute the SET PROCESS/AFFINITY command match those required by the $PROCESS_AFFINITY system service. ALTPRI is the base privilege required to make any modifications, and the only privilege required to modify the current owner's kernel thread. Modifications within the same UIC group require GROUP privilege. Modifications to any unrelated kernel thread require WORLD privilege. As with the other SET PROCESS qualifiers, the bit operations occur on the current process if no /IDENTIFICATION qualifier or explicit process name parameter is specified. Specifying a process name does not imply that all kernel threads associated with the process are affected; the SET PROCESS command affects only the initial kernel thread of a multithreaded process. /AUTO_UNSHELVE /AUTO_UNSHELVE /NOAUTO_UNSHELVE Controls whether the process automatically unshelves files. /CAPABILITY /CAPABILITY /NOCAPABILITY Allows bits in the process user capability mask to be set or cleared individually, in groups, or all at once. This qualifier is mutually exclusive with the /AFFINITY qualifier. NOTE The SET PROCESS/[NO]CAPABILITY command will fail if there is no CPU with the required set of capabilities. The /NOCAPABILITY qualifier clears all user capability bits currently set in the current or permanent capability masks, based on the setting of the /PERMANENT qualifier. Specifying the /CAPABILITY qualifier has no direct effect, but merely indicates the target of the operations specified by the following secondary qualifiers: Sets all user capabilities defined by the position /SET=(n[,..values n, where n has the range of 1 to 16. Clears all user capabilities defined by the position /CLEAR=(n[,values n, where n has the range of 1 to 16. Performs the operation on the permanent user capability /PERMANENT mask as well as the current user capability mask, making the changes valid for the life of the kernel thread. (The default behavior is to affect only the capabilities mask for the running image.) The secondary qualifiers can all be used at once as long as the user capability bits defined in the /SET and /CLEAR parameters do not overlap. The privileges required to execute the SET PROCESS/CAPABILITY command match those required by the $PROCESS_CAPABILITIES system service. ALTPRI is the base privilege required to make any modifications, and the only privilege required to modify the current owner's kernel thread. Modifications within the same UIC group require GROUP privilege. Modifications to any unrelated kernel thread require WORLD privilege. As with the other SET PROCESS qualifiers, the bit operations occur on the current process if no /IDENTIFICATION qualifier or explicit process name parameter is specified. Specifying a process name does not imply that all kernel threads associated with the process are affected; the SET PROCESS command affects only the initial kernel thread of a multithreaded process. /CLEAR /CLEAR=(n[,...]) Clears all user capabilities or CPU affinities defined by the position values n specified by the /CAPABILITY or the /AFFINITY qualifier. /DUMP /DUMP /NODUMP (default) Causes the contents of the address space to be written to the file named SYS$LOGIN:(image-name).DMP (where the image name is the same as the file name) when an image terminates due to an unhandled error. You can then analyze the dump with the ANALYZE/PROCESS_DUMP utility. /GLOBAL Modifies the global cell SCH$GL_DEFAULT_PROCESS_CAP. This global cell is used to initialize the user capability mask of processes when they are started. /IDENTIFICATION /IDENTIFICATION=pid Requires GROUP or WORLD privilege for processes other than your own. Specifies the process identification (PID) value of the kernel thread for which characteristics are to be changed. The /IDENTIFICATION qualifier overrides the process-name parameter. The PID is assigned by the system when the process is created. When you specify a PID, you can omit the leading zeros. If you use the /IDENTIFICATION qualifier, the process-name parameter is ignored. NOTE The /IDENTIFICATION qualifier allows the SET PROCESS command to affect individual kernel thread PIDs; since each thread is a separate runnable entity, this command treats them as discrete entities in terms of affinities and capabilities. /NAME /NAME=string Changes the name of the current process to a string of 1 to 15 characters. /PERMANENT Performs the operation on the permanent affinity or capability mask as well as the current mask, making the changes valid for the life of the kernel thread. (The default behavior is to affect the current mask only for the running image.) The /PERMANENT qualifier is only valid in conjunction with the /CAPABILITY or the /AFFINITY qualifier. /PRIORITY /PRIORITY=n Requires ALTPRI (alter priority) privilege to set the priority higher than the base priority of the specified process. Changes the priority for the specified kernel thread. If you do not have the ALTPRI privilege, the value you specify is compared to your current base priority, and the lower value is always used. /PRIVILEGES /PRIVILEGES=(privilege[,...]) Requires SETPRV (set privilege) privilege as an authorized privilege to enable any privilege you do not have in your authorized privilege mask. Enables the following process privileges: ACNT ALLSPOOL ALTPRI AUDIT BUGCHK BYPASS CMEXEC CMKRNL DETACH DIAGNOSE DOWNGRADE EXQUOTA GROUP GRPNAM GRPPRV IMPORT LOG_IO MOUNT NETMBX OPER PFNMAP PHY_IO PRMCEB PRMGBL PRMMBX PSWAPM READALL SECURITY SETPRV SHARE SHMEM SYSGBL SYSLCK SYSNAM SYSPRV TMPMBX UPGRADE VOLPRO WORLD Use the SHOW PROCESS/PRIVILEGES command to determine what authorized privileges are enabled currently. /RESOURCE_WAIT /RESOURCE_WAIT /NORESOURCE_WAIT Enables resource wait mode so that the process waits for resources to become available. If you specify the /NORESOURCE_ WAIT qualifier, the process receives an error status code when system dynamic memory is not available or when the process exceeds one of the following resource quotas: direct I/O limit, buffered I/O limit, or buffered I/O byte count (buffer space) quota. /RESUME Allows a process suspended by a previous SET PROCESS/SUSPEND command to resume operation. The /RESUME qualifier is equivalent to the /NOSUSPEND qualifier. /SET /SET=(n[,...]) Sets all user capabilities or CPU affinities defined by the position values n specified by the /CAPABILITY or the /AFFINITY qualifier. /SUSPEND /SUSPEND[=SUPERVISOR] /SUSPEND=KERNEL /NOSUSPEND Requires privileges as described in text. Temporarily stops the process's activities. The process remains suspended until another process resumes or deletes it. Use the qualifiers /NOSUSPEND and /RESUME to resume a suspended process. Specify either of the following keywords with the /SUSPEND qualifier to produce different results: Keyword Result SUPERVISOR Specifies that the named process is to be suspended (default) to allow the delivery of asynchronous system traps (ASTs) at EXEC or KERNEL mode. Specifying this keyword is optional. KERNEL Specifies that the named process is to be suspended such that no ASTs can be delivered. To specify the KERNEL keyword, you must be in either KERNEL mode or EXEC mode, or have CMKRNL (change mode to kernel) and CMEXEC (change mode to executive) privilege enabled. Note that this was the default behavior of the SET PROCESS/SUSPEND command for versions of OpenVMS prior to VMS Version 5.0. Depending on the operation, the process from which you specify the /SUSPEND qualifier requires privileges. You must have GROUP privilege to suspend another process in the same group, unless that process has the same user identification code (UIC). You must have WORLD privilege to suspend any other process in the system. When you issue the SET PROCESS/SUSPEND=KERNEL/ID= command in a cluster environment, the KERNEL keyword is ignored if the target process and the current process reside on different cluster nodes. As a result, process suspension is handled as if you had specified the SUPERVISOR keyword (the default). Note that you can specify SET PROCESS/SUSPEND=KERNEL to override a previous SET PROCESS/SUSPEND=SUPERVISOR. SET PROCESS/SUSPEND=SUPERVISOR does not, however, override SET PROCESS/SUSPEND=KERNEL. /SWAPPING /SWAPPING (default) /NOSWAPPING Requires the PSWAPM (process swap) privilege to disable swapping for your process. Permits the process to be swapped. By default, a process that is not currently executing can be removed from physical memory so that other processes can execute. If you specify the /NOSWAPPING qualifier, the process is not swapped out of the balance set when it is in a wait state. 3 Examples 1.$ SET PROCESS/PRIVILEGE=EXQUOTA The SET PROCESS command in this example assigns the current process the privilege of exceeding quotas. 2.$ SET PROCESS/NORESOURCE_WAIT The SET PROCESS command in this example disables resource wait mode for the current process. 3.$ RUN/PROCESS_NAME=TESTER CALC %RUN-S-PROC_ID, identification of created process is 0005002F $ SET PROCESS/PRIORITY=10 TESTER The RUN command in this example creates a subprocess and gives it the name TESTER. Subsequently, the SET PROCESS/PRIORITY command assigns the subprocess a priority of 10. 4.$ SHOW PROCESS/SUBPROCESS 19-APR-1994 15:17:28.41 User: DAVIS Process ID: 31900218 Node: OCALA Process name: "DAVIS" Processes in this tree: DAVIS * DAVIS_1 DAVIS_2 $ SET PROCESS/SUSPEND DAVIS_1 $ The SET PROCESS/SUSPEND command in this example suspends the process DAVIS_1 such that ASTs can be delivered to it. Because no keyword was specified, the /SUSPEND=SUPERVISOR version is assumed. 5.$ SHOW PROCESS/SUBPROCESS OCALA::CHEESE 19-APR-1994 12:17:24.45 User: CHEESE Process ID: 31400208 Node: OCALA Process name: "CHEESE" Processes in this tree: CHEESE * CHEESE_1 CHEESE_2 $ SET PROCESS OCALA::CHEESE_2 /SUSPEND=KERNEL $ The SET PROCESS/SUSPEND=KERNEL command in this example suspends the process CHEESE_2 on node OCALA such that no ASTs can be delivered to it. 6.$ SET PROCESS CPUSCHED/AFFINITY/SET=1/PERMANENT $ SET PROCESS CPUSCHED/CAPABILITY/SET=8/PERMANENT $ SHOW CPU/FULL COBRA7, a DEC 4000 Model 620 Multiprocessing is ENABLED. Streamlined synchronization image loaded. Minimum multiprocessing revision levels: CPU = 1 System Page Size = 8192 System Revision Code = System Serial Number = Default CPU Capabilities: System: QUORUM RUN Default Process Capabilities: System: QUORUM RUN PRIMARY CPU = 00 CPU 00 is in RUN state Current Process: *** None *** Serial Number: AY24870417 Revision: A200 VAX floating point operations supported. IEEE floating point operations and data types supported. Processor is Primary Eligible. PALCODE: Revision Code = 5.48 PALcode Compatibility = 0 Maximum Shared Processors = 2 Memory Space: Physical address = 00000000 00000000 Length = 0 Scratch Space: Physical address = 00000000 00000000 Length = 0 Capabilities of this CPU: System: PRIMARY QUORUM RUN User bitmask: 00000040 Processes which can only execute on this CPU: NETACP PID = 0000008E Reason: PRIMARY Capability CPU 01 is in RUN state Current Process: CPUSCHED PID = 00000095 Serial Number: AY24870406 Revision: A200 VAX floating point operations supported. IEEE floating point operations and data types supported. PALCODE: Revision Code = 5.48 PALcode Compatibility = 0 Maximum Shared Processors = 2 Memory Space: Physical address = 00000000 00000000 Length = 0 Scratch Space: Physical address = 00000000 00000000 Length = 0 Capabilities of this CPU: System: QUORUM RUN User bitmask: 00000080 Processes which can only execute on this CPU: CPUSCHED PID = 00000095 Reason: Affinitized to this CPU Reason: User capabilities - 00000080) $ SET PROCESS/NOAFFINITY/PERMANENT $ SET PROCESS/NOCAPABILITY/PERMANENT $ SHOW CPU/FULL COBRA7, a DEC 4000 Model 620 Multiprocessing is ENABLED. Streamlined synchronization image loaded. Minimum multiprocessing revision levels: CPU = 1 System Page Size = 8192 System Revision Code = System Serial Number = Default CPU Capabilities: System: QUORUM RUN Default Process Capabilities: System: QUORUM RUN CPU 00 is in RUN state Current Process: *** None *** Serial Number: AY24870417 Revision: A200 VAX floating point operations supported. IEEE floating point operations and data types supported. Processor is Primary Eligible. PALCODE: Revision Code = 5.48 PALcode Compatibility = 0 Maximum Shared Processors = 2 Memory Space: Physical address = 00000000 00000000 Length = 0 Scratch Space: Physical address = 00000000 00000000 Length = 0 Capabilities of this CPU: System: PRIMARY QUORUM RUN User bitmask: 00000040 Processes which can only execute on this CPU: NETACP PID = 0000008E Reason: PRIMARY Capability CPU 01 is in RUN state Current Process: CPUSCHED PID = 00000095 Serial Number: AY24870406 Revision: A200 VAX floating point operations supported. IEEE floating point operations and data types supported. PALCODE: Revision Code = 5.48 PALcode Compatibility = 0 Maximum Shared Processors = 2 Memory Space: Physical address = 00000000 00000000 Length = 0 Scratch Space: Physical address = 00000000 00000000 Length = 0 Capabilities of this CPU: System: QUORUM RUN User bitmask: 00000080 Processes which can only execute on this CPU: *** None *** In this example, CPU 1 has user capability 8 enabled (user mask = 80). User capability 8 is set for the initial kernel thread of process CPUSCHED, and CPU affinity is set to 1. Either of these settings forces the initial kernel thread to run only on CPU 1, as shown by the SHOW PROCESS command. Then, the SET PROCESS/NOAFFINITY/NOCAPABILITY command clears all CPU affinities and user capability requirements for the initial kernel thread of process (CPUSCHED), and the binding to CPU 1 disappears. 2 PROMPT Replaces the default DCL prompt ($ ) with the specified string. Format SET PROMPT[=string] 3 Parameter string Specifies the new prompt string. The following rules apply: o All valid ASCII characters can be used. o No more than 32 characters are allowed. o To include spaces or lowercase letters, enclose the string in quotation marks (" "). Otherwise, letters are converted automatically to uppercase; leading and trailing spaces are removed. If you do not specify the string parameter with the SET PROMPT command, the default DCL prompt ($ ) is restored. 3 Qualifier /CARRIAGE_CONTROL /CARRIAGE_CONTROL (default) /NOCARRIAGE_CONTROL Inserts carriage return and line feed characters before the prompt string. Type the qualifier after the string parameter. 3 Example $ SET PROMPT ="What's next?" What's next? SHOW TIME 19-APR-1994 14:08:58 The SET PROMPT command in this example replaces the DCL prompt ($ ) with the phrase "What's next?". When you see the prompt on your screen, you can enter any DCL command. This example uses the SHOW TIME command. 2 PROTECTION Establishes the protection that limits other users' access to a file or a group of files. Requires control access to the file. You can only change the protection on a file on the node you are currently logged in to. NOTE This command has been superseded by the SET SECURITY command. Format SET PROTECTION[=(code)] filespec[,...] 3 Parameters code Defines the protection to be applied to the specified files. If you omit the code, the access is set to the current default protection. The code is made up of the following components: o Ownership category-System (S), owner (O), group (G), or world (W). Each category can be abbreviated to its first character. o Access category-Read (R), write (W), execute (E), or delete (D). The access category is assigned to each ownership category. A null access specification means no access. filespec[,...] Specifies one or more files for which the protection is to be changed. A file name and file type are required. If you omit a version number, the protection is changed only for the highest existing version of the file. The asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters are allowed. 3 Description All disk and tape volumes have protection codes that restrict access to the volume. The protection codes for disk and tape volumes are assigned with the INITIALIZE and MOUNT commands. They cannot be changed by the SET PROTECTION command. For disk volumes, each file on the volume, including a directory file, can have a different protection associated with it. The SET PROTECTION command and other file manipulating commands let you define the protection for individual files. Use the SET PROTECTION command to change or reset the access for one or more files. If you include a protection code, the file access is changed to that code. However, you cannot change the protection code for a file across a network. If you omit both the protection code and the /PROTECTION qualifier, the file access changes to the default established by the SET PROTECTION/DEFAULT command. See the SET PROTECTION /DEFAULT command for information on how to change the default file access. A file must have read protection to allow the SET VERIFY command to set verification. 3 Qualifiers /CONFIRM /CONFIRM /NOCONFIRM (default) Controls whether SET PROTECTION prompts for verification before performing the operation. Valid responses are YES, NO, TRUE, and FALSE. Answers are not case sensitive and can be abbreviated to one letter. To stop processing the command at any point, type QUIT or press Ctrl/Z. To cancel the verification procedure but to proceed with the command, type ALL. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Controls whether the system displays the file specification of each file for which the protection is changed as the command executes. /PROTECTION /PROTECTION=(code) Filespec qualifier. The /PROTECTION qualifier lets you assign different protection codes to several files with a single SET PROTECTION command. You do not need to provide a code with the command if you use this qualifier. If you follow a file specification with the /PROTECTION qualifier, the code specified with the /PROTECTION qualifier overrides the command's code parameter. 3 Examples 1.$ DELETE INCOME.DAT;3 %DELETE-W-FILNOTDEL, error deleting DISK1:[SMITH]INCOME.DAT;3 -RMS-E-PRV, insufficient privilege or file protection violation $ SET PROTECTION=OWNER:D INCOME.DAT;3 $ DELETE INCOME.DAT;3 In this example, the file INCOME.DAT;3 has been protected against deletion. The SET PROTECTION command gives the owner the ability to delete the file INCOME.DAT;3. 2.$ SET PROTECTION - _$PAYROLL.LIS/PROTECTION=(SYSTEM:R,OWNER:RWED,GROUP:RW),- _$PAYROLL.OUT/PROTECTION=(SYSTEM:RWED,GROUP:RWED,W) The SET PROTECTION command in this example changes the protection codes applied to two files. To the file PAYROLL.LIS, it gives the system read (R) access; the owner read (R), write (W), execute (E), and delete (D) access; and users in the owner's group read (R) and write (W) access. To the file PAYROLL.OUT, it gives the system and group all types of access; the current access for the owner does not change, but the world category is denied all types of access. 3.$ SET PROTECTION A.DAT, B.DAT/PROTECTION=OWNER:RWED, C.DAT The SET PROTECTION command in this example specifies that the file A.DAT receive the default protection established for your files. The existing protection for the file B.DAT is overridden, only for the owner category, to provide read (R), write (W), execute (E), and delete (D) access. Note that no protection is specified for the file C.DAT at either the command or file level. Like A.DAT, C.DAT receives the default protection. Since no version numbers are specified, the protection settings affect only the highest versions of the three files. 4.$ SET PROTECTION=OWNER:D - _$[MALCOLM.SUB1]SUB2.DIR/PROTECTION=GROUP:D The SET PROTECTION command in this example changes the protection for the owner and group categories of the subdirectory [MALCOLM.SUB1.SUB2] to permit deletion. However, the protection for the world and system categories is not changed. 5.$ DIR/PROTECTION INCOME.DAT Directory DBA0:[SMITH] INCOME.DAT;2 (RWED,RWED,RWED,RWED) INCOME.DAT;1 (RWED,RWED,RWED,RWED) Total of 2 files. $ SET PROTECTION=(OWNER:RWE) INCOME.DAT;1 $ PURGE In this example, the file INCOME.DAT;1 has been protected against deletion by the owner. However, because the owner is also a member of the group and world categories, the file is still vulnerable to deletion. The subsequent PURGE command deletes INCOME.DAT;1. To protect the file against deletion by you (the owner), you also need to protect the file against deletion by all outer access categories. The following command shows the proper way to do this: $ SET PROTECTION=(OWNER:RWE,GROUP:RWE,WORLD:RWE) INCOME.DAT;1 3 /DEFAULT Establishes the default protection for files created by the current process. Format SET PROTECTION[=(code)]/DEFAULT 4 Parameter code Specifies the SOGW protection to be assigned by default to all files subsequently created by the current process. To override this protection you must specify an explicit protection using either the SET PROTECTION command or the /PROTECTION qualifier on the CREATE command. If you do not specify a protection code, the current default remains unchanged. The code is made up of the following components: o Ownership category-system (S), owner (O), group (G), or world (W). Each category can be abbreviated to its first character. o Access category-Read (R), write (W), execute (E), or delete (D). The access category is assigned to each ownership category. A null access specification means no access. Use the SET SECURITY command to reset security characteristics of the directory or file. 4 Example $ SET PROTECTION=(GROUP:RWED,WORLD:R)/DEFAULT The SET PROTECTION/DEFAULT command in this example sets the default protection to grant unlimited access to other users in the same group and read (R) access to all users. The default protections for system and owner are not changed. 3 /DEVICE Establishes the protection to be applied to a specific non-file- structured device. The protection for a device limits the type of access available to users. The /DEVICE qualifier is required. This command is superseded by SET SECURITY/CLASS=DEVICE. In general, requires OPER (operator) privilege. If the device protection characteristics have already been set, they will be used to determine access to the device. If the device protection characteristics have not been set, SYSPRV (system privilege) privilege is also required. NOTE This command has been superseded by the SET SECURITY command. Format SET PROTECTION=(ownership[:access][,...])/DEVICE device-name[:] 4 Parameters ownership Specifies an ownership category-system (S), owner (O), group (G), or world (W). Each category can be abbreviated to its first character. Any protection code category that the operator does not specify remains unchanged. access Specifies an access category-read (R), write (W), logical I/O (L), and physical I/O (P)-to be assigned to a specified type of owner. A null access specification means no access. device-name[:] Specifies the name of the non-file-structured device whose protection is to be set or modified. 4 Description The following four user categories apply to files and to devices: o System-All users who have octal group numbers of 0 to 108 and users with physical or logical I/O privilege (generally, system managers, system programmers, and operators). The octal group numbers 0 to 10 for system users are the default group numbers. The group number parameter can be changed at system generation time to any octal value from 0 to 377. o Owner-The user identification code (UIC) of the user who "owns" the device and who is entering the SET PROTECTION command. o Group-All users who have the same group number in their UICs as the owner of the device. o World-All users who do not fall into the categories above. For shareable devices (such as the LPA11-K), each user category can be allowed or denied one of the following types of access: o Read-The right to issue read requests to the device. o Write-The right to issue write requests to the device. o Logical I/O-The right to issue logical I/O requests to the device. o Physical I/O-The right to issue physical I/O requests to the device. For nonshareable devices, such as terminals and card readers, each category of user can be either allowed or denied access to allocate and assign channels to the device. The read category controls whether a user can allocate and assign channels to the device. All other categories are not relevant for nonshareable devices. Any combination of access types can be specified for any category of user. When the operator specifies a user access code, the code must be abbreviated to 1 character. The abbreviations are as follows: Read R Write W Logical I/O L Physical I/O P The ownership and access categories can be specified in any order. If you specify an ownership category without including any access code, that category of user is denied all types of access. When you specify one or more access categories for a user category, that user category receives only those specified types of access. If you omit a user category, the access for that category is unchanged. To specify a protection code, separate the user category from the access type with a colon (:). If you specify only one ownership category, you can omit the parentheses. 4 Qualifier /OWNER_UIC /OWNER_UIC=uic Requests that the specified user identification code (UIC) be assigned ownership of the device for the purpose of access checks. The default owner is the UIC of the process entering the SET PROTECTION command. 4 Examples 1.$ SET PROTECTION=(S:RWLP,O:RWLP,G,W)/DEVICE LAA0: The command in this example requests that the protection for device LAA0 be set to allow all types of access to system processes and processes with the UIC of the current process. This command also denies access to anyone else. 2.$ SET PROTECTION=(S,O:RWLP,G,W)/DEVICE/OWNER_UIC=[103,4] LAB0: The command in this example requests that the protection for device LAB0 be set to allow all types of access to processes with a UIC of [103,4]. This command also denies access to anyone else. 3.$ SET PROTECTION=(S:R,O,G,W)/DEVICE/OWNER_UIC=[1,4] TTA1: The command in this example requests that the protection for the terminal TTA1 be set to allow only system processes to allocate the device. This command also denies access to anyone else. This type of protection is recommended for interactive terminals if system security is necessary. Note that the above protection code restricts which users can allocate the device, but the protection does not restrict users from logging in to the device. 2 QUEUE Changes the attributes of the specified queue. Requires manage (M) access to the queue. Format SET QUEUE queue-name[:] 3 Parameter queue-name[:] Specifies the name of an execution queue or a generic queue. 3 Qualifiers /BASE_PRIORITY /BASE_PRIORITY=n Specifies the base process priority at which jobs are initiated from a batch execution queue. The base priority specifier can be any decimal value from 0 to 15. You also can specify this qualifier for an output execution queue. In this context the /BASE_PRIORITY qualifier establishes the base priority of the symbiont process when the symbiont process is created. /BLOCK_LIMIT /BLOCK_LIMIT=([lowlim,]uplim) /NOBLOCK_LIMIT Limits the size of print jobs that can be processed on an output execution queue. This qualifier allows you to reserve certain printers for certain size jobs. You must specify at least one of the parameters. The lowlim parameter is a decimal number referring to the minimum number of blocks that are accepted by the queue for a print job. If a print job is submitted that contains fewer blocks than the lowlim value, the job remains pending until the block limit for the queue is changed. After the block limit for the queue is decreased sufficiently, the job is processed. The uplim parameter is a decimal number referring to the maximum number of blocks that are accepted by the queue for a print job. If a print job is submitted that exceeds this value, the job remains pending until the block limit for the queue is changed. After the block limit for the queue is increased sufficiently, the job is processed. If you specify only an upper limit for jobs, you can omit the parentheses. For example, /BLOCK_LIMIT=1000 means that only jobs with 1000 blocks or less are processed in the queue. To specify only a lower job limit, you must use a null string ("") to indicate the upper limit. For example, /BLOCK_LIMIT=(500,"") means any job with 500 or more blocks is processed in the queue. You can specify both a lower and upper limit. For example, /BLOCK_LIMIT=(200,2000) means that jobs with less than 200 blocks or more than 2000 blocks are not processed in the queue. The /NOBLOCK_LIMIT qualifier cancels the previous block limit setting for that queue. /CHARACTERISTICS /CHARACTERISTICS=(characteristic[,...]) /NOCHARACTERISTICS Specifies one or more characteristics for processing jobs on an execution queue. If a queue does not have all the characteristics that have been specified for a job, the job remains pending. If you specify only one characteristic, you can omit the parentheses. Each time you specify the /CHARACTERISTICS qualifier, all previously set characteristics are canceled. Only the characteristics specified with the qualifier are established for the queue. Queue characteristics are installation specific. The characteristic parameter can be either a value from 0 to 127 or a characteristic name that has been defined by the DEFINE /CHARACTERISTIC command. The /NOCHARACTERISTICS qualifier cancels any characteristics settings previously established for that queue. /CLOSE Prevents jobs from being entered in the queue through PRINT or SUBMIT commands or as a result of requeue operations. To allow jobs to be entered, use the /OPEN qualifier. Whether a queue accepts or rejects new job entries is independent of the queue's state (such as paused, stopped, or stalled). When a queue is marked closed, jobs executing continue to execute and jobs pending in the queue continue to be candidates for execution. /CPUDEFAULT /CPUDEFAULT=time Defines the default CPU time limit for jobs in a batch execution queue. You can specify time as delta time, 0, INFINITE, or NONE. You can specify up to 497 days of delta time. If the queue does not have a defined CPUMAXIMUM time limit and the value established in the user authorization file (UAF) has a specified CPU time limit of NONE, either the value 0 or the keyword INFINITE allows unlimited CPU time. If you specify NONE, the CPU time value defaults to the value specified either in the UAF or by the SUBMIT command (if included). CPU time values must be greater than or equal to the number specified by the system parameter PQL_MCPULM. The time cannot exceed the CPU time limit set by the /CPUMAXIMUM qualifier. For information on specifying delta time, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. /CPUMAXIMUM /CPUMAXIMUM=time Defines the maximum CPU time limit for all jobs in a batch execution queue. You can specify time as delta time, 0, INFINITE, or NONE. You can specify up to 497 days of delta time. The /CPUMAXIMUM qualifier overrides the time limit specified in the user authorization file (UAF) for any user submitting a job to the queue. Either the value 0 or the keyword INFINITE allows unlimited CPU time. If you specify NONE, the CPU time value defaults to the value specified either in the UAF or by the SUBMIT command (if included). CPU time values must be greater than or equal to the number specified by the system parameter PQL_MCPULM. For information on specifying delta time, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. /DEFAULT /DEFAULT=(option[,...]) /NODEFAULT Establishes defaults for certain options of the PRINT command. Defaults are specified by the list of options. If you specify only one option, you can omit the parentheses. After you set an option for the queue with the /DEFAULT qualifier, you do not have to specify that option in your PRINT commands. If you do specify these options in your PRINT command, the values specified with the PRINT command override the values established for the queue with the /DEFAULT qualifier. Possible options are as follows: [NO]BURST[=keyword] Controls whether two file flag pages with a burst bar between them are printed preceding output. If you specify the value ALL (default), these flag pages are printed before each file in the job. If you specify the value ONE, these flag pages are printed once before the first file in the job. [NO]FEED Specifies whether a form feed is inserted automatically at the end of a page. [NO]FLAG[=keyword] Controls whether a file flag page is printed preceding output. If you specify the value ALL (default), a file flag page is printed before each file in the job. If you specify the value ONE, a file flag page is printed once before the first file in the job. FORM=type Specifies the default form for an output execution queue. If a job is submitted without an explicit form definition, this form is used to process the job. If no form type is explicitly specified with the FORM keyword, the system assigns the form "DEFAULT" to the queue. See also the description of the /FORM_MOUNTED qualifier. [NO]TRAILER[=keyword] Controls whether a file trailer page is printed following output. If you specify the value ALL (default), a trailer page is printed with each file in the job. If you specify the value ONE, a trailer page is printed once with the last file in the job. When you specify the BURST option for a file, the [NO]FLAG option does not add or subtract a flag page from the two flag pages that are printed preceding the file. For information on establishing mandatory queue attributes, see the description of the /SEPARATE qualifier. For information on specifying default queue attributes, see the OpenVMS System Manager's Manual. /DESCRIPTION /DESCRIPTION=string /NODESCRIPTION Specifies a string of up to 255 characters used to provide operator-supplied information about the queue. Enclose strings containing lowercase letters, blanks, or other nonalphanumeric characters (including spaces) in quotation marks (" "). The /NODESCRIPTION qualifier removes any descriptive text that may have been associated with the queue. /DISABLE_SWAPPING /DISABLE_SWAPPING /NODISABLE_SWAPPING Controls whether batch jobs executed from a queue can be swapped in and out of memory. /ENABLE_GENERIC /ENABLE_GENERIC /NOENABLE_GENERIC Specifies whether files queued to a generic queue that does not specify explicit queue names can be placed in this execution queue for processing. /FORM_MOUNTED /FORM_MOUNTED=type Specifies the mounted form for an output execution queue. If no form type is explicitly specified, the system assigns the form "DEFAULT" to the queue. If the stock of the mounted form does not match the stock of the default form, as indicated by the /DEFAULT=FORM qualifier, all jobs submitted to this queue without an explicit form definition enter a pending state and remain pending until the stock of the queue's mounted form is identical to the stock of the form associated with the job. If a job is submitted with an explicit form and the stock of the explicit form is not identical to the stock of the mounted form, the job enters a pending state and remains pending until the stock of the mounted form of the queue is identical to the stock of the form associated with the job. To specify the form type, use either a numeric value or a form name that has been defined by the DEFINE/FORM command. Form types are installation-specific. You cannot use the /FORM_MOUNTED qualifier with the /GENERIC qualifier. /JOB_LIMIT /JOB_LIMIT=n Indicates the number of batch jobs that can be executed concurrently from the queue. Specify a number in the range 1 to 255. /NO_INITIAL_FF /NO_INITIAL_FF /NONO_INITIAL_FF (default) Allows user to set or modify whether a form feed should be sent to a printer device when a queue starts. To suppress the initial form feed, set the queue with /NO_INITIAL_FF qualifier. Setting the queue with /NONO_INITIAL_FF qualifier sends a form feed to the output device before printing begins when the queue restarts. /OPEN Allows jobs to be entered in the queue through PRINT or SUBMIT commands or as the result of requeue operations. To prevent jobs from being entered in the queue, use the /CLOSE qualifier. Whether a queue accepts or rejects new job entries is independent of the queue's state (such as paused, stopped, or stalled). /OWNER_UIC /OWNER_UIC=uic Requires OPER (operator) privilege or control (C) access to the queue. Enables you to change the user identification code (UIC) of the queue. Specify the UIC by using the standard format as described in the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. /PROTECTION /PROTECTION=(ownership[:access],...) Requires OPER (operator) privilege to control access to the queue. Specifies the protection of the queue. o Specify the ownership parameter as system (S), owner (O), group (G), or world (W). o Specify the access parameter as read (R), submit (S), manage (M), or delete (D). A null access specification means no access. If you include only one protection code, you can omit the parentheses. For more information on specifying protection codes, see the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. For more information on controlling queue operations through UIC-based protection, see the OpenVMS System Manager's Manual. /RECORD_BLOCKING /RECORD_BLOCKING /NORECORD_BLOCKING Determines whether the symbiont can concatenate (or block together) output records for transmission to the output device. If you specify the /NORECORD_BLOCKING qualifier, the symbiont sends each formatted record in a separate I/O request to the output device. For the standard OpenVMS system print symbiont, record blocking can have a significant performance advantage over single-record mode. /RETAIN /RETAIN[=option] /NORETAIN Holds jobs in the queue in a retained status after they have executed. The /NORETAIN qualifier enables you to reset the queue to the default. Possible options are as follows: ALL Holds all jobs in the queue after execution (default). ERROR Holds in the queue only jobs that complete unsuccessfully. /SCHEDULE /SCHEDULE=[NO]SIZE Specifies whether pending jobs in an output queue are scheduled for printing based on the size of the job. When the /SCHEDULE=SIZE qualifier is in effect, shorter jobs print before longer ones. When the /SCHEDULE=NOSIZE qualifier is in effect, jobs are printed in the order they were submitted, regardless of size. If you enter this command while there are pending jobs in any queue, its effect on future jobs is unpredictable. /SEPARATE /SEPARATE=(option[,...]) /NOSEPARATE Specifies the mandatory queue attributes or job separation options for an output execution queue. Job separation options cannot be overridden by the PRINT command. The job separation options are as follows: [NO]BURST Specifies whether two job flag pages with a burst bar between them are printed at the beginning of each job. [NO]FLAG Specifies whether a job flag page is printed at the beginning of each job. [NO]RESET=(module[,...]Specifies one or more device control library modules that contain the job reset sequence for the queue. The specified modules from the queue's device control library (by default SYS$LIBRARY:SYSDEVCTL) are used to reset the device each time a job reset occurs. The RESET sequence occurs after any file trailer and before any job trailer. Thus, all job separation pages are printed when the device is in its RESET state. [NO]TRAILER Specifies whether a job trailer page is printed at the end of each job. When you specify the /SEPARATE=BURST qualifier, the [NO]FLAG separation option does not add or subtract a flag page from the two flag pages that are printed preceding the job. For information on establishing queue attributes that can be overridden, see the description of the /DEFAULT qualifier. For more information on specifying mandatory queue attributes, see the OpenVMS System Manager's Manual. /WSDEFAULT /WSDEFAULT=n Defines for a batch job a working set default, the default number of physical pages that the job can use. The value set by this qualifier overrides the value defined in the user authorization file (UAF) of any user submitting a job to the queue. Specify the value of n as a number of 512-byte pagelets on Alpha or 512-byte pages on VAX. Note that the OpenVMS system rounds up this value to the nearest CPU-specific page so that actual amount of physical memory allowed may be larger than the specified amount on Alpha. If you specify the value 0 or NONE, the working set default value defaults to the value specified in the UAF or by the SUBMIT command (if included). /WSEXTENT /WSEXTENT=n Defines for the batch job a working set extent, the maximum amount of physical memory that the job can use. The job uses the maximum amount of physical memory only when the system has excess free pages. The value set by this qualifier overrides the value defined in the user authorization file (UAF) of any user submitting a job to the queue. Specify the value of n as a number of 512-byte pagelets on Alpha or 512-byte pages on VAX. Note that the OpenVMS system rounds up this value to the nearest CPU-specific page so that actual amount of physical memory allowed may be larger than the specified amount on Alpha. If you specify the value 0 or NONE, the working set extent value defaults to the value specified in the UAF or by the SUBMIT command (if included). /WSQUOTA /WSQUOTA=n Defines for a batch job the working set quota, the amount of physical memory that is available to the job. The value set by this qualifier overrides the value defined in the user authorization file (UAF) of any user submitting a job to the queue. Specify the value of n as a number of 512-byte pagelets on Alpha systems or 512-byte pages on VAX systems. Note that the OpenVMS system rounds up this value to the nearest CPU-specific page so that actual amount of physical memory allowed may be larger than the specified amount on Alpha. If you specify the value 0 or NONE, the working set quota value defaults to the value specified in the UAF or by the SUBMIT command (if included). A working set default size and a working set quota (maximum size) are included in each user record in the system user authorization file (UAF). You can specify a working set default and a working set quota for both individual jobs and for all jobs in a given queue. The following table shows the action taken for different combinations of specifications that involve working set size and working set quota values. Value Specified Value by Specified the SUBMIT for the Command? Queue? Action Taken No No Use the UAF value. No Yes Use the value for the queue. Yes Yes Use the smaller of the two values. Yes No Compare the specified value with the UAF value; use the smaller. 3 Examples 1.$ INITIALIZE/QUEUE/DEFAULT=BURST/FORM_MOUNTED=LETTER/START SYS$PRINT . . . $ STOP/QUEUE/NEXT SYS$PRINT $ SET QUEUE/DEFAULT=BURST/FORM_MOUNTED=MEMO SYS$PRINT In this example, the queue is initialized with the INITIALIZE /QUEUE command. The queue has the following attributes: two file flag pages preceding each file in the job and the mounted form LETTER. Later the queue is stopped with the STOP/QUEUE /NEXT command so that the current job finishes processing before the queue stops. The SET QUEUE command changes the mounted form to MEMO. 2.$ SET QUEUE/DEFAULT=FORM=LN01_PORTRAIT LN01_PRINT In this example, the SET QUEUE command changes the default form to LN01_PORTRAIT for the LN01_PRINT queue. 3.$ SET QUEUE/CLOSE SYS$BATCH In this example, the batch queue SYS$BATCH is modified to prevent jobs from being entered in this queue. 2 RESTART_VALUE Assigns a value to the global symbol BATCH$RESTART. This global symbol defines the location at which a batch job is restarted after its execution has been interrupted. The SET RESTART_VALUE command is meaningful only in command procedures. Format SET RESTART_VALUE=string 3 Parameter string Specifies a string of up to 255 characters, which specifies the label at which the batch job should begin executing when it is restarted. 3 Example $ IF $RESTART THEN GOTO 'BATCH$RESTART' . . . $ FIRSTPART: $ SET RESTART_VALUE = FIRSTPART $ RUN PART1 . . . $ SECONDPART: $ SET RESTART_VALUE = SECONDPART $ RUN PART2 . . . In this example, the first command states that, if $RESTART is true, the procedure is to jump to the value contained in BATCH$RESTART. ($RESTART is true only if the job has been executed before, that is, the job is being rerun after a crash or after having been requeued.) The first SET RESTART_VALUE command assigns the label FIRSTPART to be equal to the symbol BATCH$RESTART. The next line contains the command to run PART1.EXE. The second SET RESTART_VALUE command assigns the label SECONDPART to be equal to the symbol BATCH$RESTART. The last line shown contains the command to run PART2.EXE. When the job is first submitted using the SUBMIT/RESTART command, the value of $RESTART is FALSE, so the IF expression is ignored. If the job is stopped during the run of PART1.EXE, the value of BATCH$RESTART is FIRSTPART. When the job is restarted, the value of $RESTART is TRUE. Thus, the IF expression is processed and transfers control to the FIRSTPART label in the procedure. PART1.EXE is rerun. If the job is stopped during the run of PART2.EXE, the value of BATCH$RESTART is SECONDPART. When the job is restarted, the value of $RESTART is TRUE. In this instance, the IF-GOTO command transfers control to the SECONDPART label in the procedure so that PART2.EXE can be run. PART1.EXE is not rerun. 2 RIGHTS_LIST Allows users to modify the process or system rights list. You must specify either the /DISABLE or the /ENABLE qualifier with the SET RIGHTS_LIST command. Format SET RIGHTS_LIST id-name[,...] 3 Parameter id-name[,...] Specifies identifiers to be added to or removed from the process or system rights list. The id-name parameter is a string of 1 to 31 alphanumeric characters, underscores (_), and dollar signs ($); each name must contain at least one nonnumeric character. 3 Qualifiers /ATTRIBUTES /ATTRIBUTES=(keyword[,...]) Specifies attributes to be associated with the identifiers. Attributes may be added to new or existing identifiers. The following are valid keywords: DYNAMIC Allows unprivileged holders of the identifier to remove and to restore the identifier from the process rights list by using the DCL command SET RIGHTS_LIST. NOACCESS Makes any access rights of the identifier null and void. If a user is granted an identifier with the No Access attribute, that identifier has no effect on the user's access rights to objects. This attribute is a modifier for an identifier with the Resource or Subsystem attribute. RESOURCE Allows holders of an identifier to charge disk space to the identifier. Used only for file objects. SUBSYSTEM Allows holders of the identifier to create and maintain protected subsystems by assigning the Subsystem ACE to the application images in the subsystem. Used only for file objects. To remove an attribute from the identifier, add a NO prefix to the attribute keyword. For example, to remove the Resource attribute, specifiy /ATTRIBUTE=NORESOURCE. The default uses the current processes in the rights database. Use the command SHOW PROCESS/RIGHTS to see the attributes of the current process. /DISABLE Removes the identifiers from the process or system rights list. You cannot use the /DISABLE qualifier with the /ENABLE qualifier. /ENABLE Adds the identifiers to the process or system rights list. You cannot use the /ENABLE qualifier with the /DISABLE qualifier. /IDENTIFICATION /IDENTIFICATION=pid Specifies the process identification (PID) value of the process whose rights list is to be modified. The PID is assigned by the system when the process is created. When you specify a PID, you can omit the leading zeros. If you specify the /IDENTIFICATION qualifier, you cannot use the /PROCESS qualifier. By default, if neither the /IDENTIFICATION nor the /PROCESS qualifier is specified, the current process is assumed. You cannot use the /IDENTIFICATION qualifier with the /SYSTEM qualifier. /PROCESS /PROCESS[=process-name] Specifies the name of the process whose rights list is to be modified. The process name can contain from 1 to 15 alphanumeric characters. If you specify the /PROCESS qualifier, you cannot use the /IDENTIFICATION qualifier. By default, if neither the /PROCESS nor the /IDENTIFICATION qualifier is specified, the current process is assumed. You cannot use the /PROCESS qualifier with the /SYSTEM qualifier. /SYSTEM Specifies that the desired operation (addition or removal of an identifier) be performed on the system rights list. You cannot use the /SYSTEM qualifier with the /PROCESS or the /IDENTIFICATION qualifier. 3 Examples 1.$ SET RIGHTS_LIST/ENABLE/ATTRIBUTES=RESOURCE MARKETING The SET RIGHTS_LIST command in this example adds the MARKETING identifier to the process rights list of the current process. Specifying the RESOURCE attribute allows holders of the MARKETING identifier to charge resources to it. 2.$ SET RIGHTS_LIST/ENABLE/SYSTEM PHYSICS101 %SYSTEM-F-NOPRIV, insufficient privilege or object protection violation $ SET PROCESS/PRIVILEGES=(CMKRNL,SYSNAM) $ SET RIGHTS_LIST/ENABLE/SYSTEM PHYSICS101 The SET RIGHTS_LIST command in this example adds the PHYSICS101 identifier to the system rights list. You must have both the CMKRNL (change mode to kernel) and SYSNAM (system logical name) privileges to modify the system rights list. 2 RMS_DEFAULT Defines default values for multiblock and multibuffer counts, network transfer sizes, prolog level, and extend quantity used by OpenVMS Record Management Services (RMS) for file operations. If you set the default value for either the multiblock count or the multibuffer count at 0, RMS tries to use the process default value or the system default value, in that order. If these are set at 0, RMS uses a default value of 1. Defaults are set for sequential, relative, or indexed file organizations on a process- only basis, unless a systemwide basis is requested. Format SET RMS_DEFAULT 3 Qualifiers /BLOCK_COUNT /BLOCK_COUNT=count Specifies a default multiblock count (0 to 127) for record I/O operations only, where count is the number of blocks to be allocated for each I/O buffer. For more information on multiblock count, see the description of the RAB$B_MBC in the OpenVMS Record Management Services Reference Manual. /BUFFER_COUNT /BUFFER_COUNT=count Specifies a default multibuffer count (0 to 255) for local file operations, where count is the number of buffers to be allocated. If you use the /SYSTEM qualifier to extend the default value systemwide, the maximum default value is 127. When you use the /BUFFER_COUNT qualifier, you can use the /DISK, /INDEXED, /MAGTAPE, /RELATIVE, /SEQUENTIAL, and /UNIT_RECORD qualifiers to specify the types of file for which the default is to be applied. If the /BUFFER_COUNT qualifier is specified without any of these qualifiers, the /SEQUENTIAL qualifier is assumed. If file type is not specified, the default is applied to sequential files. For more information on multibuffer count, see the description of the RAB$B_MBF field in the OpenVMS Record Management Services Reference Manual. /DISK Applies the specified defaults to disk file operations. Values applied using the /SEQUENTIAL qualifier take precedence over values applied using the /DISK qualifier. /EXTEND_QUANTITY /EXTEND_QUANTITY=n Specifies the number of blocks n to extend a sequential file where n can range from 0 to 65535. If you do not specify the /EXTEND_QUANTITY qualifier, RMS calculates its own extend value. The /EXTEND_QUANTITY qualifier value is used when the program does not specify an extent quantity explicitly. /INDEXED Applies the multibuffer default to indexed file operations. /MAGTAPE Applies the multibuffer default to magnetic tape operations. Values applied using the /SEQUENTIAL qualifier take precedence over values applied using the /MAGTAPE qualifier. /NETWORK_BLOCK_COUNT /NETWORK_BLOCK_COUNT=count Specifies a default block count (0 to 127) for network access to remote files, where count is the number of blocks to be allocated for each I/O buffer. For remote file access, the buffer size is negotiated between RMS and the remote system's file access listener (FAL) with the smaller of the two sizes being selected. Thus, the /NETWORK_BLOCK_COUNT value places an upper limit on the network buffer size that is used. It also places an upper limit on the largest record that may be transferred to or from a remote file. The largest record must be less than or equal to 512*network_block_count. (The network_block_count is in block units and the record is in byte units.) If you omit the value or specify a value of 0, RMS uses the systemwide block count value. If this value is also 0, RMS uses a size of one block. /PROLOG /PROLOG=n Specifies a default prolog level for indexed files where acceptable values for n are 0, 2, or 3. If 0 (default) is specified, RMS sets an appropriate prolog level. /RELATIVE Applies the multibuffer default to relative file operations. /SEQUENTIAL /SEQUENTIAL (default) Applies the multibuffer default to sequential file operations. The /SEQUENTIAL qualifier overrides values applied using either the /DISK, the /MAGNETIC TAPE, or the /UNIT RECORD qualifier. The /SEQUENTIAL qualifier is the default if you do not specify either the /RELATIVE or the /INDEXED qualifier. /SYSTEM Requires CMKRNL (change mode to kernel) privilege. Applies specified defaults on a systemwide basis to all file operations. System-wide settings are implemented as system parameters. For a system-wide setting to survive a system reboot, it must be written to the system parameter file by using SYSGEN. /UNIT_RECORD Applies the multibuffer default to file operations on unit record devices. Values applied using the /SEQUENTIAL qualifier take precedence over values applied using the /UNIT_RECORD qualifier. 3 Examples 1.$ SET RMS_DEFAULT/BLOCK_COUNT=24 $ SHOW RMS_DEFAULT MULTI- | MULTIBUFFER COUNTS | NETWORK BLOCK | Indexed Relative Sequential | BLOCK COUNT | Disk Magtape Unit Record | COUNT Process 24 | 0 0 0 0 0 | 0 System 16 | 0 0 0 0 0 | 8 Prolog Extend Quantity Process 0 0 System 0 0 The SET RMS_DEFAULT command in this example sets the multiblock count for disk file I/O at 24 for user programs that do not set the multiblock count explicitly. The command applies only to the current process. 2.$ SET RMS_DEFAULT/BUFFER_COUNT=8/MAGTAPE $ SHOW RMS_DEFAULT MULTI- | MULTIBUFFER COUNTS | NETWORK BLOCK | Indexed Relative Sequential | BLOCK COUNT | Disk Magtape Unit Record | COUNT Process 24 | 0 0 0 8 0 | 0 System 16 | 0 0 0 0 0 | 8 Prolog Extend Quantity Process 0 0 System 0 0 The SET RMS_DEFAULT command in this example defines the default multibuffer count for I/O magnetic tape operations at 8. 3.$ SET RMS_DEFAULT/BUFFER_COUNT=7/NETWORK_BLOCK_COUNT=16/SYSTEM $ SHOW RMS_DEFAULT MULTI- | MULTIBUFFER COUNTS | NETWORK BLOCK | Indexed Relative Sequential | BLOCK COUNT | Disk Magtape Unit Record | COUNT Process 24 | 0 0 0 8 0 | 0 System 16 | 0 0 7 7 7 | 16 Prolog Extend Quantity Process 0 0 System 0 0 The SET RMS_DEFAULT command in this example defines the systemwide default multibuffer count at 7 for all sequential file operations on disk, magnetic tape, and unit record devices. The command also sets the network block count at 16. 4.$ SET RMS_DEFAULT/EXTEND=50/INDEXED/BUFFER_COUNT=5 $ SHOW RMS_DEFAULT MULTI- | MULTIBUFFER COUNTS | NETWORK BLOCK | Indexed Relative Sequential | BLOCK COUNT | Disk Magtape Unit Record | COUNT Process 24 | 5 0 0 8 0 | 0 System 16 | 0 0 7 7 7 | 16 Prolog Extend Quantity Process 0 50 System 0 0 The SET RMS_DEFAULT command in this example sets the default multibuffer count for I/O operations on indexed files at 5. It also defines the default extend quantity for sequential I/O operations at 50 blocks. These defaults apply only to disk operations for user programs that do not set the multiblock count explicitly. These defaults are limited to the current process. 5.$ SET RMS_DEFAULT/PROLOG=2 $ SHOW RMS_DEFAULT MULTI- | MULTIBUFFER COUNTS | NETWORK BLOCK | Indexed Relative Sequential | BLOCK COUNT | Disk Magtape Unit Record | COUNT Process 24 | 5 0 0 8 0 | 0 System 16 | 0 0 7 7 7 | 16 Prolog Extend Quantity Process 2 50 System 0 0 The SET RMS_DEFAULT command in this example specifies Prolog 2 as default for indexed files for the current process. 2 SECURITY Modifies the security profile of an object. Format SET SECURITY object-name 3 Parameter object-name Specifies the name of an object, such as a file or device, whose security profile is to be modified. An object is identified by an object name and a class name. The default class name is FILE. An object name of the FILE class (explicitly or implicitly specified) can include an asterisk (*) or a percent sign (%) wildcard character, but wildcard characters are not allowed in any class other than FILE. SET SECURITY does not operate on remote files and devices, alias directory entries, or directory names in UIC format (for example, [14,5]). The following table shows the qualifier categories for the SET SECURITY command. ACL- Security File- General Modifying Class Specific Transfer Qualifiers Qualifiers Qualifier Qualifiers Qualifiers /ACL /AFTER /PROFILE /BACKUP /COPY_ATTRIBUTE /CLASS /DELETE /BEFORE /LIKE /LOG /EDIT /BY_OWNER /OWNER /REPLACE /CONFIRM /PROTECTION /CREATED /DEFAULT /EXCLUDE /EXPIRED /MODIFIED /SINCE 3 Qualifiers /ACL /ACL[=(ace[,...])] Identifies one or more access control list entries (ACEs) to add, replace, or delete. Enclose each ACE in parentheses and separate multiple ACEs by commas (,). The most common type of entry, the Identifier ACE, has the format (IDENTIFIER=identifier, ACCESS=access-type(+...)). By default, SET SECURITY adds an ACE to the top of the ACL. This behavior changes when you include one of the positional qualifiers: /AFTER, /DELETE, or /REPLACE. See the discussion of ACL ordering in the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. /AFTER /AFTER=ace Positions all ACEs specified with the /ACL qualifier after the ACE named with the /AFTER qualifier. /BACKUP Modifies the time value provided with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /BACKUP qualifier selects files according to the date of their most recent backup (rather than by the creation, expiration, or modification date). By default, SET SECURITY selects files according to their creation date. /BEFORE /BEFORE[=time] Selects only those files dated prior to the specified time. You can specify time as absolute time, as a combination of absolute and delta times, or as one of the following keywords: BOOT, LOGIN, TODAY (default), TOMORROW, or YESTERDAY. Specify the /CREATED or the /MODIFIED qualifier to indicate the time attribute to be used as the basis for selection. The /CREATED qualifier is the default. For complete information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. /BY_OWNER /BY_OWNER[=uic] Selects files whose owner's UIC matches the UIC specified. The default UIC is that of the current process. /CLASS /CLASS=class-name Specifies the class of the object whose profile is to be modified. By default, the command assumes the object class is FILE. /CONFIRM Controls whether SET SECURITY prompts for verification before performing the operation. Valid responses are YES, NO, TRUE, and FALSE. Answers are not case sensitive and can be abbreviated to one letter. To stop processing the command at any point, type QUIT or press Ctrl/Z. To cancel the verification procedure but to proceed with the command, type ALL. /COPY_ATTRIBUTE /COPY_ATTRIBUTE=(keyword[,...]) Specifies a subset of security elements to transfer from a source object to a target object. Valid keywords include the following: Keyword Description ALL Copy all security elements (default) ACL Copy the access control list OWNER Copy the owner PROTECTION Copy the protection code Use the /COPY_ATTRIBUTE qualifier with the /LIKE qualifier. For example, you can create an ACL for an object and then copy its ACL to new objects. /CREATED Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /CREATED qualifier selects files according to the date they were created (rather than by the backup, expiration, or modification date). By default, SET SECURITY selects files according to their creation date. /DELETE /DELETE[=ALL] Deletes ACEs according to the following rules: o The expression /ACL=aces/DELETE deletes the named ACEs. o The expression /ACL/DELETE deletes all unprotected ACEs. o The expression /ACL/DELETE=ALL deletes all ACEs including protected ACEs. o The expression /ACL=aces/DELETE=ALL deletes the existing ACL (if any) and create a new ACL with the ACEs specifies on the /ACL qualifier. /DEFAULT Regenerates the security profile of a file. The default qualifier changes the protection code, the ACL, and the owner elements of a file to what it would be if the file had just been created. The profile is recreated according to the following rules: o The protection code is propagated from the default protection ACE on the directory (if one exists), or else it is propagated from the process default. o The ACL is propagated from the parent directory for those ACEs that have the default option. o The owner is set to the owner of the parent directory. With subdirectory files, SET SECURITY assigns the owner, protection, and ACL elements of the parent directory. SET SECURITY does not copy any ACE on the source object if the ACE holds the nopropagate attribute nor does it change any ACE on the target object if the ACE holds the protected attribute. To apply new elements to all versions of the file, specify ;* in the object name. Refer to the OpenVMS Guide to System Security for more information on propagation rules. /EDIT Invokes the access control list editor (ACL editor) and allows you to modify an ACL interactively. The ACL editor does not allow the asterisk (*) and the percent sign (%) wildcard characters in an object name. You must specify the object whose ACL you are editing. The /EDIT qualifier must be the first qualifier on the command line; other qualifiers can include /CLASS and, if the class is SECURITY_CLASS, you can include the /PROFILE qualifier. Whenever an object does not belong to the FILE class, you also need to specify /CLASS. See the ACL editor in the OpenVMS System Management Utilities Reference Manual for more information. /EXCLUDE /EXCLUDE=(filespec[,...]) Excludes the specified files from the SET SECURITY operation. You can include a directory, but not a device, in the file specification. You cannot use relative version numbers to exclude a specific version. /EXPIRED Modifies the time specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /EXPIRED qualifier selects files according to their expiration dates rather than by the backup, creation, or modification date. (The expiration date is set with the SET FILE/EXPIRATION_DATE command.) By default, files are selected according to their creation date. /LIKE /LIKE=(NAME=source-object-name [,CLASS=source-object-class] [,PROFILE=TEMPLATE=template-name]) Identifies the object from which SET SECURITY should copy security elements. The /LIKE qualifier replaces an object's existing elements with those of the source object. Nopropagate ACEs are not transferred and protected ACEs on the target object are not deleted. Use the /COPY_ATTRIBUTE qualifier with the /LIKE qualifier to copy an object's elements. Refer to the OpenVMS Guide to System Security for information about the special handling of protected and nopropagate ACEs. The object class of the source object defaults to the class of the target object. When the /CLASS qualifier is omitted, the CLASS keyword defaults to FILE. The PROFILE keyword applies to security class objects. It identifies which template of the security class you want to copy and modify. See /PROFILE for more information. /LOG Controls whether the SET SECURITY command displays the name of the object that has been modified by the command. The qualifier is invalid with the /EDIT qualifier. /MODIFIED Modifies the time value specified with the /BEFORE or the /SINCE qualifier. The /MODIFIED qualifier selects files according to the dates on which they were last modified, rather than by the backup, creation, or expiration date. By default, files are selected according to their creation date. /OWNER /OWNER=identifier Modifies the owner element of an object. Specify the user identification code (UIC) or general identifier in the standard format. Modifying the owner element of a file usually requires privileges. See the discussion in the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. /PROFILE /PROFILE=TEMPLATE[=template-name] Identifies which template profile of a security class object you want to modify. All object classes except FILE have at least one template profile. These template profiles define the basis of the profile of new objects. Use the DCL command SHOW SECURITY /CLASS=SECURITY_CLASS to display template names. When no value is given for template-name, SET SECURITY uses the template named DEFAULT. Include the /CLASS=SECURITY_CLASS qualifier to identify which profile you want to modify. /PROTECTION /PROTECTION=(ownership[:access][,...]) Modifies the protection code of an object. The protection code defines the type of access allowed to users, based on their relationship to the object's owner. Specify the ownership parameter as system (S), owner (O), group (G), or world (W). Access types are class specific and are shown in the following table. For access, use the first letter of the access name. Object Class Access Types CAPABILITY (VAX Use, Control only) COMMON_EVENT_FLAG_ Associate, Delete, Control CLUSTER DEVICE Read, Write, Physical, Logical, Control FILE (including Read, Write, Execute, Delete, Control directory file) GROUP_GLOBAL_ Read, Write, Execute, Control SECTION LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE Read, Write, Create, Delete, Control QUEUE Read, Submit, Manage, Delete, Control RESOURCE_DOMAIN Read, Write, Lock, Control SECURITY_CLASS Read, Write, Control, Logical I/O, Physical I/O SYSTEM_GLOBAL_ Read, Write, Execute, Control SECTION VOLUME Read, Write, Create, Delete, Control /REPLACE /REPLACE=(ace[,...]) Eliminates entries listed with the /ACL qualifier and adds entries listed with the /REPLACE qualifier. SET SECURITY inserts the entries listed with /REPLACE in the position of the last deleted ACE. /SINCE /SINCE[=time] Selects only those files dated after the specified time. You can specify time as absolute time, as a combination of absolute and delta times, or as one of the following keywords: BOOT, LOGIN, TODAY (default), TOMORROW, or YESTERDAY. Specify the /CREATED or the /MODIFIED qualifier to indicate the time attribute to be used as the basis for selection. The /CREATED qualifier is the default. For complete information on specifying time values, see the OpenVMS User's Manual or the topic SPECIFY Date_Time in online help. 3 Examples 1.$ SHOW SECURITY LNM$GROUP /CLASS=LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE LNM$GROUP object of class LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE Owner: [SYSTEM] Protection: (System: RWCD, Owner: R, Group: R, World: R) Access Control List: (IDENTIFIER=[USER,SMITH],ACCESS=CONTROL) $ SET SECURITY LNM$GROUP /CLASS=LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE - _$ /ACL=((IDENTIFIER=CHEKOV,ACCESS=CONTROL), - _$ (IDENTIFIER=WU,ACCESS=READ+WRITE)) - _$ /DELETE=ALL - _$ /PROTECTION=(S:RWCD, O:RWCD, G:R, W:R) $ SHOW SECURITY LNM$GROUP /CLASS=LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE LNM$GROUP object of class LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE Owner: [SYSTEM] Protection: (System: RWCD, Owner: RWCD, Group: R, World: R) Access Control List: (IDENTIFIER=[USER,CHEKOV],ACCESS=CONTROL) (IDENTIFIER=[USER,WU],ACCESS=READ+WRITE) This example shows how to make a straightforward change to the security elements of an object. The first SHOW SECURITY command displays the current settings of the LNM$GROUP logical name table. The SET SECURITY command resets the ACL to allow control access for user Chekov, and to allow read and write access for user Wu. Note that without the /DELETE=ALL qualifier, these ACEs would have been added to the existing ACL rather than superseding it. The protection is also changed to allow read, write, create, and delete access for the owner. The last command displays the results of the changes. 2.$ SHOW SECURITY LNM$GROUP /CLASS=LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE LNM$GROUP object of class LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE Owner: [SYSTEM] Protection: (System: RWCD, Owner: R, Group: R, World: R) Access Control List: (IDENTIFIER=[USER,FERNANDEZ],ACCESS=CONTROL) $ SHOW SECURITY LNM$JOB /CLASS=LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE LNM$JOB object of class LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE Owner: [USER,WEISS] Protection: (System: RWCD, Owner: RWCD, Group, World) Access Control List: <empty> $ SET SECURITY LNM$JOB /CLASS=LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE - _$ /LIKE=(NAME=LNM$GROUP, CLASS=LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE) - _$ /COPY_ATTRIBUTES=PROTECTION $ SET SECURITY LNM$JOB /CLASS=LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE - _$ /ACL=(IDENTIFIER=FERNANDEZ, ACCESS=READ) $ SHOW SECURITY LNM$JOB /CLASS=LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE LNM$JOB object of class LOGICAL_NAME_TABLE Owner: [USER,WEISS] Protection: (System: RWCD, Owner: R, Group: R, World: R) Access Control List: (IDENTIFIER=[USER,FERNANDEZ],ACCESS=READ) This example shows how to copy security access information from one object to another and, at the same time, set some elements explicitly. The first SHOW SECURITY commands display the current settings for the LNM$GROUP and LNM$JOB logical name tables. The SET SECURITY command copies the protection code from the LNM$GROUP logical name table to the LNM$JOB logical name table and adds an ACE to allow read access to another user. The final SHOW SECURITY command shows the effect of the changes. 3.$ SHOW SECURITY SECURITY_CLASS /CLASS=SECURITY_CLASS SECURITY_CLASS object of class SECURITY_CLASS Owner: [SYSTEM] Protection: (System: RWED, Owner: RWED, Group: R, World: R) Access Control List: <empty> Template: DEFAULT Owner: [SYSTEM] Protection: (System: RWED, Owner: RWED, Group, World: RE) Access Control List: <empty> $ SET SECURITY SECURITY_CLASS /CLASS=SECURITY_CLASS - _$ /PROFILE=TEMPLATE=DEFAULT - _$ /PROTECTION=(S:RWE, O:RWE, G:RE) $ SHOW SECURITY SECURITY_CLASS /CLASS=SECURITY_CLASS SECURITY_CLASS object of class SECURITY_CLASS Owner: [SYSTEM] Protection: (System: RWED, Owner: RWED, Group: R, World: R) Access Control List: <empty> Template: DEFAULT Owner: [SYSTEM] Protection: (System: RWE, Owner: RWE, Group: RE, World: RE) Access Control List: <empty> This example demonstrates how to change the security elements for the template of a security class object. The first command shows the current settings for the SECURITY_CLASS object. The second command changes the DEFAULT template of the SECURITY_ CLASS object such that the protection is (S:RWE, O:RWE, G:RE). The change is shown in the display of the last command. The world protection of RE remains unchanged. 2 SERVER Controls starting, stopping, and restarting of the security server. The security server maintains information stored in the system intrusion and proxy databases. Format SET SERVER server-name 3 Parameter server-name The server-name must be SECURITY_SERVER. 3 Qualifiers /EXIT Stop the detached security server process. /RESTART Restart the detached security server process. /START Start the detached security server process. 3 Examples 1.$ SET SERVER SECURITY_SERVER/START This command starts the detached security server process. 2.$ SET SERVER SECURITY_SERVER/EXIT This command stops the detached security server process. 3.$ SET SERVER SECURITY_SERVER/RESTART This command restarts the detached security server process. 2 SYMBOL Controls access to local and global symbols in command procedures. Format SET SYMBOL 3 Qualifiers /ALL /ALL (default) Specifies that the values of the /SCOPE qualifier pertain both to the translation of the first token on a command line and to general symbol substitution. The /ALL qualifier is incompatible with the /GENERAL or the /VERB qualifier. /GENERAL Specifies that the values of the /SCOPE qualifier pertain to the translation of all symbols except the first token on a command line. The /GENERAL qualifier is incompatible with the /ALL or the /VERB qualifier. /SCOPE /SCOPE=(keyword,...) Controls access to local and global symbols. Lets you treat symbols as being undefined. Possible keywords are as follows: NOLOCAL Causes all local symbols defined in outer procedure levels to be treated as being undefined by the current procedure and by all inner procedure levels. LOCAL Removes any symbol translation limit set by the current procedure level. NOGLOBAL Causes all global symbols to be inaccessible to the current procedure level and to all inner procedure levels unless otherwise changed. GLOBAL Restores access to all global symbols. /VERB Specifies that the values of the /SCOPE qualifier pertain to the translation of the first token on a command line as a symbol before processing only. It does not affect general symbol substitution. NOTE Caution must be used if the SET SYMBOL/VERB/SCOPE command is used more than once in a command procedure. Because DCL uses the translation behavior when looking for a label or subroutine, execution may be different running in one mode than in another. Digital recommends that the SET SYMBOL /VERB/SCOPE command be used once as part of the command procedure setup and left in that mode for the duration of the procedure. The /VERB qualifier is incompatible with the /ALL or the /GENERAL qualifier. 3 Examples 1.$ SET SYMBOL/SCOPE=NOLOCAL In this example, all local symbols defined in outer procedure levels are now undefined for the current procedure level and all inner procedure levels. 2.$ SET SYMBOL/SCOPE=NOGLOBAL In this example, all global symbols are now inaccessible to the current procedure level and all inner procedure levels unless otherwise changed. 3.$ NOW :== SHOW TIME $ ! $ NOW 7-APR-1994 11:48:58 $ ! $ SET SYMBOL /VERB /SCOPE=NOGLOBAL $ NOW %DCL-W-IVVERB, unrecognized command verb-check validity and spelling \NOW\ $ ! $ SHOW SYMBOL NOW NOW == "SHOW TIME" This example demonstrates the use of the /VERB qualifier. The symbol NOW is assigned to the SHOW TIME command. The next line shows the default behavior, where DCL attempts to translate the first string on the command line (NOW). Since NOW translates to the SHOW TIME command, this is used instead of NOW. The SET SYMBOL command on the next line changes the behavior so that DCL does not attempt a translation. When NOW is subsequently entered, DCL uses the string NOW as the command verb and cannot find it in the command table. This results in the error message. Notice that the scoping of the verb translation has no effect on general symbol translations, as demonstrated by the SHOW SYMBOL command in the example. 2 TERMINAL Sets the characteristics of a terminal. Entering a qualifier changes a characteristic; omitting a qualifier leaves the characteristic unchanged. Format SET TERMINAL [device-name[:]] 3 Parameter device-name[:] Specifies the device name of the terminal. The default is SYS$COMMAND if that device is a terminal. If the device is not a terminal, an error message is displayed. 3 Qualifiers /ADVANCED_VIDEO /ADVANCED_VIDEO /NOADVANCED_VIDEO Controls whether the terminal has advanced video attributes and is capable of 132-column video. If the terminal width is set to 132 columns and you specify the /ADVANCED_VIDEO qualifier, the terminal page limit is set to 24 lines. If you specify the /NOADVANCED_VIDEO qualifier, the terminal page limit is set to 14 lines. /ALTYPEAHD Causes the terminal driver to create a permanent, alternate type- ahead buffer. The system parameter TTY_ALTYPAHD determines the size of the type-ahead buffer. This specification is effective at your next login and stays in effect until you reboot your VAX computer. To enable /ALTYPEAHD, you must also set the qualifier /TYPE_ AHEAD. You should specify SETTERMINAL/PERMANENT/ALTYPEAHD in SYS$STARTUP:SYSTARTUP_VMS.COM for those communication lines that require this capability. To use this feature interactively, specify SET TERMINAL /PERMANENT/ALTYPEAHD. This specification is effective at your next login. /ANSI_CRT /ANSI_CRT (default) /NOANSI_CRT Controls whether the terminal conforms to ANSI CRT programming standards. Since ANSI standards are a proper subset of the DEC_ CRT characteristics, the default for all VT100 family terminals is /ANSI_CRT. /APPLICATION_KEYPAD Specifies that the keypad is to be set to application keypad mode, which allows you to enter DCL commands defined with the DEFINE/KEY command. By default, the terminal is set to numeric keypad mode. /AUTOBAUD /AUTOBAUD /NOAUTOBAUD Controls whether the terminal baud rate is set when you log in and sets the default terminal speed to 9600. You must press the Return key two or more times at intervals of at least 1 second for the baud rate to be determined correctly. If you press a key other than the Return key, the /AUTOBAUD qualifier may detect the wrong baud rate. If this happens, wait for the login procedure to time out before continuing. The /AUTOBAUD qualifier must be used with the /PERMANENT qualifier. The valid baud rates are as follows: 50 150 1800 4800 38400 75 300 2000 7200 57600 110 600 2400 9600 76800 134 1200 3600 19200 115200 /BLOCK_MODE /BLOCK_MODE /NOBLOCK_MODE Controls whether block mode transmission, local editing, and field protection are performed. /BRDCSTMBX /BRDCSTMBX /NOBRDCSTMBX Controls whether broadcast messages are sent to an associated mailbox if one exists. /BROADCAST /BROADCAST (default) /NOBROADCAST Controls whether reception of broadcast messages (such as those issued by MAIL and REPLY) is enabled. Specify the /NOBROADCAST qualifier when you are using a terminal as a noninteractive device or when you do not want special output to be interrupted by messages. Use the SET BROADCAST command to exclude certain types of messages from being broadcast, rather than eliminating all messages. /COLOR Sets the ANSI_COLOR terminal characteristic and identifies the terminal as capable of supporting the ANSI color escape sequences. /COMMSYNC /COMMSYNC /NOCOMMSYNC (default) Allows connection of asynchronous printers and other devices to terminal ports, using standard modem control signals as flow control. Transmission to the device stops if either data set ready (DSR) or clear to send (CTS) EIA modem control signals are dropped. Transmission resumes when both signals are present. The /COMMSYNC qualifier and the /MODEM qualifier are mutually exclusive. The COMMSYNC feature has the following limitations: o Cannot be used on LAT ports o Can only be used on ports with full modem control o Should not be used in conjunction with Xon/Xoff flow control (the port may hang) CAUTION The /COMMSYNC qualifier should never be set on a line with a modem that is intended for interactive use. The qualifier disables the modem terminal characteristic that disconnects a user process from the terminal line in case of a modem phone line failure. With the /COMMSYNC qualifier enabled, the next call on the terminal line could be attached to the previous user's process. Security administrators should be aware that the characteristic should not be used on interactive terminal ports. In addition, the /COMMSYNC qualifier is not supported on a port connected to a LAT line. /CRFILL /CRFILL[=fill-count] Generates the specified number of null characters after each carriage return before transmitting the next meaningful character (to ensure that the terminal is ready for reception). The value must be an integer in the range 0 to 9. The default is the /CRFILL=0 qualifier. /DEC_CRT /DEC_CRT[=(value1,value2,value3)] /NODEC_CRT[=(value1,value2,value3)] Controls whether the terminal conforms to Digital VT100-, VT200-, VT300-, VT400-, or VT500-family standards and supports the minimum standards, including the additional DIGITAL escape sequences. You can specify one of the following values: 1 Requests that the DEC_CRT terminal characteristic be (default) set. 2 Requests that the DEC_CRT2 terminal characteristic be set. 3 Requests that the DEC_CRT3 terminal characteristic be set. A level 3 terminal supports the following additional features: o A status line (line 25, at the bottom of the screen) o The ISO Latin1 character set o Terminal state interrogation (describes what state your terminal is in) 4 Requests that the DEC_CRT4 terminal characteristic be set. A level 4 terminal supports the following additional features: o Extended keyboard o Key position mode o Secure reset o Novice mode o Selective erase o On-line transaction processing (OLTP) features: - Page memory - Rectangular editing - Text macros - Data integrity reports Note that DEC_CRT2, DEC_CRT3, and DEC_CRT4 are supersets of DEC_ CRT. Clearing DEC_CRT causes DEC_CRT2, DEC_CRT3, and DEC_CRT4 to be cleared. Similarly, setting DEC_CRT4 causes all subsets of DEC_CRT4 (including ANSI_CRT) to be set. /DEVICE_TYPE /DEVICE_TYPE=terminal-type Informs the system of the terminal type and sets characteristics according to the device type specified. You can specify any of the following terminal types: UNKNOWN LA100 PRO_SERIES VT102 VT200 FT1-FT8 LA120 VT05 VT105 VT300 LA12 LA210 VT52 VT125 VT400 LA34 LN01K VT55 VT131 VT500 LA36 LN03 VT100 VT132 LA38 LQP02 VT101 VT173 The default characteristics for the VT100-, VT102-, and VT125- series terminals are as follows: /ADVANCEDVIDEO /NOALTYPEAHD /ANSI_CRT /NOAUTOBAUD /NOBLOCK_MODE /NOBRDCSTMBX /BROADCAST /CRFILL=0 /ECHO /NOEIGHT_BIT /NOESCAPE /NOFORM /FULLDUP /NOHOSTSYNC /LFFILL=0 /LOWERCASE /NODMA /PAGE=24 /NOPARITY /NOPASTHRU /NOREADSYN /SPEED=9600 /TAB /TTSYNC /TYPE_AHEAD /WIDTH=80 /WRAP /DIALUP /DIALUP /NODIALUP (default) Controls whether the terminal is a dialup terminal. /DISCONNECT /DISCONNECT /NODISCONNECT (default) Controls whether the process connected to this terminal is disconnected if the line detects a hangup. The /DISCONNECT qualifier is valid only when the /PERMANENT qualifier is specified. /DISMISS /DISMISS /NODISMISS (default) Controls whether the terminal driver ignores data that causes a parity error (instead of terminating the currently outstanding I/O with an error status). /DMA /DMA /NODMA Controls whether direct memory access (DMA) mode is used on a controller that supports this feature. /ECHO /ECHO (default) /NOECHO Controls whether the terminal displays the input it receives. With the /NOECHO qualifier, the terminal displays only system or user application output, or both. /EDIT_MODE /EDIT_MODE /NOEDIT_MODE Controls whether the terminal can perform ANSI-defined advanced editing functions. /EIGHT_BIT /EIGHT_BIT /NOEIGHT_BIT Controls whether the terminal uses the 8-bit ASCII protocol rather than the 7-bit ASCII protocol. You can use the Terminal Fallback Facility (TFF) to set the 8-bit characteristic on terminals. If the terminal you specify has the TFF enabled, the /EIGHT_BIT qualifier has no effect. For more information on terminal fallback, see the OpenVMS Terminal Fallback Utility Manual. /ESCAPE /ESCAPE /NOESCAPE (default) Controls whether escape sequences are validated. /FALLBACK /FALLBACK /NOFALLBACK Controls whether the 8-bit DEC Multinational character set characters are displayed on the terminal in their 7-bit representation. The default depends on the /EIGHTBIT setting of the terminal. If the OpenVMS Terminal Fallback Facility (TFF) is enabled, it activates the default character conversion tables for the named terminal. For more information, see the OpenVMS Terminal Fallback Utility Manual. If TFF is not enabled on your system, the /FALLBACK qualifier has no effect and no error message is displayed. /FORM /FORM /NOFORM Controls whether a form feed is transmitted rather than translated into multiple line feeds. /FRAME /FRAME=n Specifies the number of data bits that the terminal driver expects for every character that is input or output. The value of n can be from 5 to 8. The default value depends on the settings for the terminal established by the /PARITY and /EIGHTBIT qualifiers. /FULLDUP /FULLDUP (default) /NOFULLDUP Controls whether the terminal operates in full-duplex mode. The /FULLDUP qualifier is equivalent to the /NOHALFDUP qualifier. /HALFDUP /HALFDUP /NOHALFDUP (default) Controls whether the terminal operates in half-duplex mode. The /HALFDUP qualifier is equivalent to the /NOFULLDUP qualifier. /HANGUP /HANGUP /NOHANGUP (default) May require LOG_IO (logical I/O) or PHY_IO (physical I/O) privilege depending on system generation parameter settings. Controls whether the terminal modem is hung up when you log out. /HARDCOPY /HARDCOPY /NOHARDCOPY Controls whether the device is established as a hardcopy terminal and outputs a backslash (\) when the Delete key is pressed. The /HARDCOPY qualifier is equivalent to the /NOSCOPE qualifier. /HOSTSYNC /HOSTSYNC /NOHOSTSYNC (default) Controls whether system transmission from the terminal is stopped (by generating a Ctrl/S) when the input buffer is full and resumed (by generating a Ctrl/Q) when the input buffer is empty. /INQUIRE Sets the device type when the /INQUIRE qualifier is specified and the DEC_CRT characteristic is set. The SET TERMINAL command reads the current screen size from the terminal and sets the corresponding page length and page width values appropriately. The default device type is UNKNOWN. Works only on Digital terminals, and not on LA36 or VT05 terminals. Some VT100 family terminals, including the VT101 and VT105, return a VT100 type response. LA38 terminals respond as LA43 terminals. NOTE The SET TERMINAL/INQUIRE command works correctly on DIGITAL supplied VT100 and later terminals. Some personal computer terminal emulators may not work correctly, since they do not correctly emulate all VT100 escape sequences. DIGITAL recommends that users who experience problems with these terminal emulators contact the terminal emulator supplier. You can include the SET TERMINAL/INQUIRE command in your LOGIN.COM file to detect the terminal type automatically. If you specify /INQUIRE=OLD, OpenVMS sets the terminal window to 24 lines by 80 columns and ignores the real terminal size. (This is the behavior of the SET TERMINAL/INQUIRE command prior to OpenVMS Version 6.2.) CAUTION This qualifier clears the type-ahead buffer. If the response sequence is unrecognized, no action message or error message is displayed. The /INQUIRE qualifier should be used only on Digital terminals. However, the LA36 and VT05 terminals do not support this feature. /INSERT Sets the terminal to insert mode. This feature allows you to insert characters when editing command lines. The default mode is overstrike, which allows you to type over the current character when editing a command line. Press Ctrl/A to switch from one mode to the other. /LFFILL /LFFILL[=fill-count] Transmits to the terminal the specified number of null characters after each line feed before transmitting the next meaningful character (to ensure that the terminal is ready for reception). The value must be an integer in the range 0 to 9. The default is installation dependent. /LINE_EDITING /LINE_EDITING /NOLINE_EDITING Controls whether advanced line-editing features are enabled for editing command lines: pressing the Return key and pressing Ctrl/Z are recognized as line terminators, as are escape sequences. /LOCAL_ECHO /LOCAL_ECHO /NOLOCAL_ECHO (default) Controls whether the terminal echoes characters locally (rather than the host echoing them) for command level terminal functions. (Do not use the /LOCAL_ECHO qualifier with utilities that require control over echoing, such as line editing or EDT's screen mode.) CAUTION When logging in to terminals with the LOCAL_ECHO characteristic, the OpenVMS system has no control over the echoing of passwords. /LOWERCASE /LOWERCASE /NOLOWERCASE Controls whether lowercase characters are passed to the terminal. The /NOLOWERCASE qualifier translates all input to uppercase. The /LOWERCASE qualifier is equivalent to the /NOUPPERCASE qualifier. /MANUAL Indicates manual switching of terminal lines to dynamic asynchronous DDCMP lines when your local terminal emulator does not support automatic switching. The /MANUAL qualifier should be specified with the /PROTOCOL=DDCMP and /SWITCH=DECNET qualifiers. /MODEM /MODEM /NOMODEM Specifies whether the terminal is connected to a modem or a cable that supplies standard EIA modem control signals. If your terminal has the MODEM characteristic, entering SET TERMINAL /NOMODEM automatically logs you out. The /MODEM qualifier and the /COMMSYNC qualifier are mutually exclusive. /NUMERIC_KEYPAD /NUMERIC_KEYPAD (default) Specifies whether the keys of the numeric keypad are used to type numbers and punctuation marks (/NUMERIC_KEYPAD) or to enter DCL commands defined with the DEFINE/KEY command (/APPLICATION_KEYPAD). /OVERSTRIKE /OVERSTRIKE (default) Sets the terminal to overstrike mode. This feature allows you to type over the current character when you are editing a command line. Set your terminal to insert mode if you want to insert characters when editing command lines. Press Ctrl/A to switch from one mode to the other. /PAGE /PAGE[=lines-per-page] Specifies the number of print lines between perforations for hardcopy terminals. (When the terminal reads a form feed, it advances the paper to the next perforation.) The value of the lines-per-page parameter can be from 0 to 255 and defaults to 0 (which treats a form feed as a line feed). /PARITY /PARITY[=option] /NOPARITY (default) Controls whether the terminal passes data with only odd or even parity, where option equals ODD or EVEN. If you specify the /PARITY qualifier without an option, the value defaults to EVEN. /PASTHRU /PASTHRU /NOPASTHRU (default) Controls whether the terminal passes all data (including tabs, carriage returns, line feeds, and control characters) to an application program as binary data. The setting of /TTSYNC is allowed. Make sure that you spell both these qualifiers exactly as they appear in the text. /PERMANENT Requires LOG_IO (logical I/O) or PHY_IO (physical I/O) privilege. Sets characteristics on a permanent basis, that is, over terminal sessions. However, the characteristics revert to their initial values if the system is halted and restarted. Use in a system startup file to establish characteristics for all terminals on the system. /PRINTER_PORT /PRINTER_PORT /NOPRINTER_PORT Specifies whether the terminal has a printer port (an attribute not set by the SET TERMINAL/INQUIRE command). The default is installation dependent. /PROTOCOL /PROTOCOL=DDCMP /PROTOCOL=NONE (default) On VAX, controls whether the terminal port specified is changed into an asynchronous DDCMP line. The /PROTOCOL=NONE qualifier changes an asynchronous DDCMP line back into a terminal line. Note that /PROTOCOL=DDCMP is a permanent characteristic; therefore, the /PERMANENT qualifier is not required. /READSYNC /READSYNC /NOREADSYNC (default) Controls whether the terminal uses the Ctrl/S and Ctrl/Q functions to synchronize data transmitted from the terminal. CAUTION SET TERMINAL/READSYNC should not be used on LAT terminal lines. Setting this characteristic may cause unexpected results. The default is the /NOREADSYNC qualifier; the system does not use the Ctrl/S and Ctrl/Q functions to control reads to the terminal. The /READSYNC qualifier is useful for certain classes of terminals that demand synchronization or for special-purpose terminal lines where data synchronization is appropriate. /REGIS /REGIS /NOREGIS Specifies whether the terminal understands ReGIS graphic commands. /SCOPE /SCOPE /NOSCOPE Controls whether the device is established as a video terminal. The /SCOPE qualifier is equivalent to the /NOHARDCOPY qualifier. /SECURE_SERVER /SECURE_SERVER /NOSECURE_SERVER (default) Requires either LOG_IO (logical I/O) or PHY_IO (physical I/O) privilege. Controls whether the Break key on the terminal logs out the current process (except on a virtual terminal). With the /SECURE_ SERVER qualifier in effect, pressing the Break key when there is no current process initiates the login sequence. With the /NOSECURE_SERVER qualifier in effect, the break is ignored. On terminals with the AUTOBAUD and SECURE_SERVER characteristics, pressing the Break key disconnects the current process, but is not required to start a new login sequence. However, when the NOAUTOBAUD characteristic is set, the SECURE_SERVER characteristic requires a break to initiate a new login sequence. /SET_SPEED /SET_SPEED /NOSET_SPEED Requires either LOG_IO (logical I/O) or PHY_IO (physical I/O) privilege. Controls whether the /SPEED qualifier can be used to change the terminal speed. /SIXEL_GRAPHICS /SIXEL_GRAPHICS /NOSIXEL_GRAPHICS Specifies whether the terminal is capable of displaying graphics using the sixel graphics protocol. The default is device dependent. /SOFT_CHARACTERS /SOFT_CHARACTERS /NOSOFT_CHARACTERS Specifies twhether the terminal is capable of loading a user- defined character set. The default is device dependent. /SPEED /SPEED=(input-rate,output-rate) Sets the baud rate at which the terminal receives and transmits data. If the input and output rates are the same, specify /SPEED=rate. Not all terminals support different input and output baud rates. For specific information on baud rates for your terminal, consult the manual for that terminal. The default transmission rates are installation dependent. The valid values for input and output baud rates are as follows: 50 150 1800 4800 38400 75 300 2000 7200 57600 110 600 2400 9600 76800 134 1200 3600 19200 115200 /SWITCH /SWITCH=DECNET On VAX, causes the terminal lines at each node to be switched to dynamic asynchronous DDCMP lines, when specified with the /PROTOCOL=DDCMP qualifier. Note that /SWITCH=DECNET is a permanent characteristic; therefore, the /PERMANENT qualifier is not required. /SYSPASSWORD /SYSPASSWORD /NOSYSPASSWORD (default) Requires LOG_IO (logical I/O) privilege. Determines whether the terminal requires that a system password be entered before the Username: prompt. /TAB /TAB /NOTAB Controls whether tab characters are converted to multiple blanks. The /NOTAB qualifier expands all tab characters to blanks and assumes tab stops at 8-character intervals. The default is device dependent. /TTSYNC /TTSYNC (default) /NOTTSYNC Controls whether transmitting to the terminal is stopped when Ctrl/S is pressed and resumes transmission when Ctrl/Q is pressed. /TYPE_AHEAD /TYPE_AHEAD (default) /NOTYPE_AHEAD Controls whether the terminal accepts unsolicited input to the limit of the type-ahead buffer. When you specify the /NOTYPE_AHEAD qualifier, the terminal accepts input only when a program or the system issues a read to the terminal, such as for user input at the DCL prompt ($). When you specify the /TYPE_AHEAD qualifier, the amount of data that can be accepted is governed by the size of the type-ahead buffer. That size is determined by system generation parameters. /UNKNOWN Specifies a terminal type that is unknown to the system, which then uses the default terminal characteristics for unknown terminals. /UPPERCASE /UPPERCASE /NOUPPERCASE Controls whether lowercase characters are translated to uppercase. The /UPPERCASE qualifier is equivalent to the /NOLOWERCASE qualifier. /WIDTH /WIDTH=characters-per-line Specifies the maximum characters per line. This value must be an integer in the range 1 to 511. With the /WRAP qualifier, the terminal generates a carriage return and line feed when the width specification is reached. If the specified width on an ANSI terminal is 132, the screen is set to 132-character mode. If the terminal does not have advanced video option (AVO), the page length limit is set to 14 lines. /WRAP /WRAP (default) /NOWRAP Controls whether a carriage return and line feed are generated when the value of the /WIDTH qualifier is reached. 3 Examples 1.$ SET TERMINAL/DEVICE=VT102 In this example, the SET TERMINAL command establishes the current terminal as a VT102 terminal and sets the default characteristics for that terminal type. 2.$ SET TERMINAL/WIDTH=132/PAGE=60/NOBROADCAST $ TYPE MEMO.DOC . . . $ SET TERMINAL/DEVICE=LA36 In this example, the first SET TERMINAL command indicates that the width of terminal lines is 132 characters and that the size of each page is 60 lines. The /NOBROADCAST qualifier disables the reception of broadcast messages while the terminal is printing the file MEMO.DOC. The next SET TERMINAL command restores the terminal to its default state. 2 TIME Resets the system clock, which is used as a timer to record intervals between various internal events and as a source clock for displaying the time of day. Requires both OPER (operator) and LOG_IO (logical I/O) privileges. Format SET TIME[=time] 3 Parameter time Specifies a date in the format day-month-year, or a time in the format hour:minute:second.hundredth, or both. These fields accept the following values: Field Type Values Day Integer 1 to 31 Month String JAN, FEB, MAR, APR, MAY, JUN, JUL, AUG, SEP, OCT, NOV, or DEC Year Integer 1858 to 9999 - VAX only Year Integer 1957 to 2056 - Alpha only Hour Integer 0 to 23 Minute Integer 0 to 59 Second Integer 0 to 59 Hundredth Integer 0 to 99 The hyphens (-), colons (:), and period (.) are required delimiters. Separate the date and time, when both are specified, with a colon. The syntax is sometimes specified as follows: [dd-mmm-yyyy[:]] [hh:mm:ss.cc] Alpha systems also allow a 2-digit year format: [dd-mmm-yy[:]] [hh:mm:ss.cc] The century applied to the 2-digit year format is determined by the corresponding year in the supported Alpha date range (1957- 2056). If the explicit time value is not specified, the interval system clock is automatically reset according to the time-of-year clock. Note that the time-of-year clock is optional for some VAX processors. For further information about the time-of-year clock, see the hardware documentation for your Digital computer. NOTE Alpha systems maintain system time during power failures and system down time. When a system is booted, if the time is known to be earlier than the time value of the last time modification, or greater than five years in the future, you are prompted to enter the time at the console prompt. 3 Description Resets the system clock, which is used as a timer to record intervals between various internal events and as a source clock for displaying the time of day. NOTE The SET TIME command will not work if there is a time service available on your system or OpenVMS Cluster. 3 Qualifier /CLUSTER Requires OPER and LOG_IO privilege, and in an OpenVMS Cluster environment, SYSLCK privilege. Sets the time on all nodes in a cluster to the same system time. 3 Examples 1.$ SET TIME=14-DEC-1995:19:31:0.0 The SET TIME command in this example sets the date and time at December 14, 1995, 7:31 P.M. 2.$ SET TIME $ SHOW TIME 14-DEC-1995 03:21:27.53 The SET TIME command in this example sets the system time according to the time-of-year clock. The SHOW TIME command requests a display of the current time. 3.$ SET TIME=14-DEC-1995:15:31:0.0/CLUSTER This example sets the date and time to December 14, 1995, 3:31 P.M. on all nodes in the cluster where the command was issued. 2 UIC Changes the user identification code (UIC) of a process, which is one part of its security profile. Requires CMKRNL (change mode to kernel) privilege. NOTE This command is obsolete and no longer supported. Format SET UIC [uic] 3 Parameter uic Specifies a valid user identification code (UIC). Brackets ([]) are required around the UIC. The UIC specifies the group number and member number. Specify the UIC by using standard UIC format as described in the section on UIC protection in the Security Guide. 3 Examples 1.$ SET UIC [370,10] The SET UIC command in this example establishes your UIC as [370,10]. You can now read or modify any files whose access is restricted to this UIC. 2.$ SET UIC [214,4] $ SET DEFAULT [ANDERSON] The SET UIC command in this example sets your UIC to [214,4]; the SET DEFAULT command sets the default directory name to [ANDERSON]. 3.$ SET UIC [GEORGE] This example sets the UIC to be that of the user named GEORGE who is a member of the same group as the person entering the SET UIC command. Note the similarity of this UIC format to the directory name format. Be sure not to use a UIC where a directory specification is needed. 4.$ SET UIC [VMS,GEORGE] This example sets the UIC to be that of the user named GEORGE who is a member of the OpenVMS system group. The person entering the SET UIC command need not be a member of the OpenVMS system group. 2 VERIFY Controls whether command lines and data lines in command procedures are displayed at the terminal or are printed in a batch job log. The information displayed by the SET VERIFY command can help you in debugging command procedures. Format SET VERIFY [=([NO]PROCEDURE, [NO]IMAGE)] SET NOVERIFY 3 Parameter ([NO]PROCEDURE, [NO]IMAGE) Specifies one or both types of verification. Procedure verification causes each DCL command line in a command procedure to be written to the output device. Image verification causes data lines (input data that is included as part of the SYS$INPUT input stream) to be written to the output device. By default, both types of verification are set or cleared with SET VERIFY and SET NOVERIFY. If you specify only one keyword, the other is not affected. If you specify only one keyword, omit the parentheses. 3 Examples 1.$ SET VERIFY = PROCEDURE In this example, procedure verification is turned on. If image verification was on, it remains on; if image verification was off, it remains off. 2.$ SET VERIFY $ INDEX == "$INDEX.EXE $ CONTENTS == "$CONTENTS.EXE $ TABLE == "$TABLE.EXE $ SET NOVERIFY $ EXIT Procedure and image verification are turned on at the beginning of the command procedure so that the system displays all the command and data lines in the procedure as it reads them. At the end of the procedure, the SET NOVERIFY command restores the system default (no procedure or image verification). 3.$ PROC_VER = F$ENVIRONMENT("VERIFY_PROCEDURE") $ IMAGE_VER = F$ENVIRONMENT("VERIFY_IMAGE") $ HOLD_PREFIX = F$ENVIRONMENT("VERIFY_PREFIX") $ SET PREFIX "(!%T)" $ SET VERIFY . . . $ TEMP = F$VERIFY(PROC_VER, IMAGE_VER) $ SET PREFIX "''HOLD_PREFIX'" This command procedure uses the F$ENVIRONMENT lexical function to save the current procedure and image verification setting, as well as the current verification prefix string. The SET PREFIX command sets the verification prefix to be used in the current command procedure. It uses an FAO control string to produce the time each command is read by the command interpreter (DCL), surrounded by parentheses. Then the SET VERIFY command turns on both procedure and image verification. Subsequently, the F$VERIFY lexical function is used to restore the original verification settings. The SET PREFIX command returns the verification prefix to its previous setting. Note how the symbol HOLD_PREFIX is used in the SET PREFIX command. This preserves casing and special characters in the stored string. 4.$ SET VERIFY $ @TEST $ RUN AVERAGE 1 2 3 $ EXIT In this example, the SET VERIFY command turns procedure and image verification on. When the command procedure TEST.COM is executed interactively, the command lines and the data lines for the program AVERAGE are displayed on the terminal. The data lines were entered in the command procedure on lines that did not begin with the DCL prompt. 5.$ SET VERIFY $ COUNT = 1 $ IF P'COUNT' .NES. "" THEN GOTO &P'COUNT' . . . $ EXIT When this command procedure is executed interactively, the SET VERIFY command causes the command and data lines to be displayed. Symbols that are substituted during the first phase of symbol substitution (such as 'COUNT') are displayed by the SET VERIFY command, but other symbols are not. The following lines are displayed when this procedure is executed interactively: $ COUNT = 1 $ IF P1 .NES. "" THEN GOTO &P1 . . . Although these values are not displayed, the value for P1 is substituted during the third phase of symbol substitution, and the value for &P1 is substituted during the second phase. 2 VOLUME Changes the characteristics of one or more mounted Files-11 volumes. The SET VOLUME command affects only the node on which the command is issued, and will not affect any other nodes, even when a volume is mounted on multiple nodes in an OpenVMS Cluster configuration. If you are not the owner of the volume, requires control access to the volume. Format SET VOLUME device-name[:][,...] 3 Parameter device-name[:][,...] Specifies the name of one or more mounted Files-11 volumes. 3 Qualifiers /ACCESSED /ACCESSED[=n] Requires OPER (operator) privilege. Specifies the number of directories to be maintained in system space for ready access. You can specify a value n in the range of 0 to 255. If you specify the qualifier /ACCESSED and omit the number of directories, a default value of 3 is used. If you specify a value greater than the current value, the new value is effective immediately; otherwise, the new value is not effective until the next time the volume is mounted. /DATA_CHECK /DATA_CHECK[=(option[,...])] Defines a default for data check operations following all read and write operations to the specified volume. (If you do not specify the /DATA_CHECK qualifier, no checks are made.) Possible keywords are as follows: READ Performs checks following all read operations. WRITE Performs checks following all write operations (default). /ERASE_ON_DELETE /ERASE_ON_DELETE /NOERASE_ON_DELETE (default) Determines whether the space occupied by a file is overwritten with a system-specified pattern when a file on the volume is deleted. /EXTENSION /EXTENSION[=n] Specifies the number of blocks to be used as a default extension size for all files on the volume. You can specify a value n in the range of 0 to 65,535. If you specify the /EXTENSION qualifier without specifying a value, a default value of 0 (the OpenVMS RMS default) is used. For example, during an update operation, the extension default is used when a file increases to a size greater than its initial default allocation. /FILE_PROTECTION /FILE_PROTECTION=(ownership[:access][,...]) Sets the default protection to be applied to all files on the specified disk volume. Specify the ownership parameter as system (S), owner (O), group (G), or world (W) and the access parameter as read (R), write (W), execute (E), or delete (D). A null access specification means no access. NOTE This attribute is not used while the volume is in use on an OpenVMS system, but the attribute is provided to control the process use of the volume on RSX-11M systems. The OpenVMS system always uses the default file protection; the protection can be changed with the DCL command SET PROTECTION/DEFAULT. /HIGHWATER_MARKING /HIGHWATER_MARKING /NOHIGHWATER_MARKING Determines whether the file highwater mark (FHM) volume attribute is set. The FHM attribute guarantees that a user cannot read data that was not written by the user. Applies to Files-11 On-Disk Structure Level 2 volumes only. /LABEL /LABEL=volume-label Specifies a 1- to 12-character ANSI name to be encoded on the volume. The specified label remains in effect until it is changed explicitly; dismounting the volume does not affect the label. Digital strongly recommends that a volume label should consist only of alphanumeric characters, dollar signs ($), underscores (_), and hyphens (-). If you change the volume label on an OpenVMS system disk, you should also update the POLYCENTER Software Installation utility database. To accomplish this, use the PRODUCT REGISTER VOLUME command to replace the old volume label with the new volume label. NOTE Changing the volume label does not change other structures that used the original volume label. For example, the DISK$labelname logical is not changed nor is the device-lock name that is kept internally by OpenVMS. As a result, if you attempt to access another disk that has the same volume label as the original volume of this device, you may get error messages such as the following: "%MOUNT-F-VOLALRMNT, another volume of same label already mounted". Digital recommends that, if you change a disk volume label, you also dismount and remount the disk on all nodes in the cluster so that the names and locks are consistent. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Determines whether the volume specification of each volume is displayed after the modification. /MOUNT_VERIFICATION /MOUNT_VERIFICATION /NOMOUNT_VERIFICATION Determines whether mount verification is enabled. Mount verification prevents interruption to user input/output operations and notifies the operator of problems with the disk. /OWNER_UIC /OWNER_UIC[=uic] Sets the owner user identification code (UIC) of the volume to the specified UIC. The default UIC is that of the current process. Brackets ([]) are required around the UIC. Specify the UIC by using standard UIC format as described in the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. /PROTECTION /PROTECTION=(ownership[:access][,...]) Specifies the protection to be applied to the volume. o Specify the ownership parameter as system (S), owner (O), group (G), or world (W). o Specify the access parameter as read (R), write (W), create (C), or delete (D). The default protection is all types of access by all categories of user. /REBUILD /REBUILD[=FORCE] Recovers caching limits for a volume that was dismounted improperly. If a disk volume was dismounted improperly (such as during a system failure), and was then remounted with the MOUNT /NOREBUILD command, you can use SET VOLUME/REBUILD to recover the caching that was in effect at the time of the dismount. The FORCE option forces the disk to be rebuilt unconditionally, thus updating the free block count in the disk volume's lock value block. /RETENTION /RETENTION=(min[,max]) Specifies the minimum and maximum retention times to be used by the file system to determine the expiration date for files on the volume. When a file is created, its expiration date is set to the current time plus the maximum time. Each time the file is accessed, the current time is added to the minimum time. If the sum is greater than the expiration date, a new expiration date is computed. If you omit the maximum value, a default value that is the smaller of (2 x min) or (min + 7) days is used. For example, /RETENTION=3- is the same as /RETENTION=(3-,6-), while /RETENTION=10- is the same as /RETENTION=(10-,17-). The command SET VOLUME/RETENTION=0 disables retention times on the volume. /SUBSYSTEM /SUBSYSTEM /NOSUBSYSTEM Enables the processing of subsystem ACEs. Requires the SECURITY privilege. By default, the disk from which you boot has protected subsystems enabled but other disks do not. For further details on subsystems, see the OpenVMS Guide to System Security. /UNLOAD /UNLOAD (default) /NOUNLOAD Specifies whether the volume is unloaded (spun down) when the DCL command DISMOUNT is entered. /USER_NAME /USER_NAME[=user-name] Specifies a user name of up to 12 alphanumeric characters to be recorded on the volume. The default name is the current process user name. /WINDOWS /WINDOWS[=n] Specifies the number of mapping pointers to be allocated for file windows. The value of n can be from 7 to 80; the default value is 7. 3 Examples 1.$ SET VOLUME/DATA_CHECK=(READ,WRITE) DBC5 The SET VOLUME command in this example requests that data checks be performed following all read and write operations to DBC5. 2.$ SET VOLUME/FILE_PROTECTION=(S:RWED,O:RWED,G:RE,W:RE) DBC5 The SET VOLUME command in this example sets the default protection to be applied to all files created on volume DBC5. System (S) and owner (O) are granted all types of access; group (G) and world (W) are permitted only to read and execute files on DBC5. 3.$ SET VOLUME/LABEL=LICENSES DBC5 The SET VOLUME command in this example encodes the label LICENSES on the volume DBC5. Note that if characters in labels are entered in lowercase, they are changed to uppercase by the /LABEL qualifier. 4.$ SET VOLUME/ACCESSED=25/USER_NAME=MANAGER/LOG DBA0: The SET VOLUME command in this example specifies that 25 directories are to be maintained in system space for ready access for the volume DBA0. The command also assigns the user name MANAGER to the volume and displays the volume specification after the volume is modified. 5.$ SET VOLUME/REBUILD/LOG NODE$DBA2: %SET-I-MODIFIED, _NODE$DBA2: modified The SET VOLUME command in this example causes a rebuild operation to begin on the volume that is mounted on NODE$DBA2. The /LOG qualifier directs the SET VOLUME command to display a notification message. 2 WORKING_SET Redefines the default working set size for the process, or sets an upper limit to which the working set size can be changed by an image that the process executes. Working set limits cannot be set to exceed those defined in the user authorization file (UAF). Specify the value of n as a number of 512-byte pagelets on Alpha or 512-byte pages on VAX. Note that the OpenVMS system rounds up this value to the nearest CPU-specific page so that actual amount of physical memory allowed may be larger than the specified amount on Alpha. Format SET WORKING_SET 3 Qualifiers /ADJUST /ADJUST (default) /NOADJUST Controls whether the system can automatically adjust the size of the process working set. /EXTENT /EXTENT=n Specifies the maximum number of physical pages that can be resident in the working set during image execution. The extent value must be greater than the minimum working set defined at system generation, and it must be less than or equal to the authorized extent defined in the UAF. If you specify a value greater than the authorized extent, the command sets the working set limit at the maximum authorized value. /LIMIT /LIMIT=n Specifies the size to which the working set is to be reduced at image exit. If you specify a value greater than the current quota, the quota value is also increased. /LOG /LOG /NOLOG (default) Determines whether confirmation of the SET WORKING_SET command is displayed. /QUOTA /QUOTA=n Specifies the maximum number of physical pages that any image executing in the process context can request. An image can set the working set size for the process by calling the $ADJWSL (Adjust Working Set Limit) system service. If you specify a quota value that is greater than the authorized quota, the working set quota is set to the authorized quota value. 3 Examples 1.$ SHOW WORKING_SET Working Set /Limit= 150 /Quota= 700 /Extent= 700 Adjustment enabled Authorized Quota= 700 Authorized Extent= 700 $ SET WORKING_SET/QUOTA=1000 %SET-I-NEWLIMS, new working set: Limit = 150 Quota = 700 Extent = 700 The SHOW WORKING_SET command in this example displays the current limit, quota, and extent, as well as the authorized quota and authorized extent. The SET WORKING_SET command attempts to set a quota limiting the maximum number of pages any image can request that is greater than the authorized quota. Note from the response that the quota was not increased. 2.$ SHOW WORKING_SET Working Set /Limit= 150 /Quota= 350 /Extent= 350 Adjustment enabled Authorized Quota= 350 Authorized Extent= 350 $ SET WORKING_SET/LIMIT=100 %SET-I-NEWLIMS, new working set: Limit = 100 Quota = 350 Extent = 350 $ SHOW WORKING_SET Working Set /Limit= 100 /Quota= 350 /Extent= 350 Adjustment enabled Authorized Quota= 350 Authorized Extent= 350 The SET WORKING_SET command in this example sets the working set size for any image in the process to 100.

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