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1 EXAMINE

Displays the contents of virtual memory. Requires user-mode read (R) access to the virtual memory location whose contents you want to examine. Format EXAMINE location[:location] 2 Parameter location[:location] Specifies a virtual address or a range of virtual addresses (where the second address is larger than the first) whose contents you want to examine. If you specify a range of addresses, separate the beginning and ending addresses with a colon (:). A location can be any valid arithmetic expression containing arithmetic or logical operators or previously assigned symbols. Radix qualifiers determine the radix in which the address is interpreted; hexadecimal is the initial default radix. Symbol names are always interpreted in the radix in which they were defined. The radix operators %X, %D, or %O can precede the location. A hexadecimal value must begin with a number (or be preceded by %X). The DEPOSIT and EXAMINE commands maintain a pointer to the current memory location. The EXAMINE command sets this pointer to the last location examined when you specify an EXAMINE command. You can refer to this location using the period (.) in a subsequent EXAMINE command or DEPOSIT command. 2 Qualifiers /ASCII Displays the data at the specified location in ASCII format. Binary values that do not have ASCII equivalents are displayed as periods (.). When you specify the /ASCII qualifier, or when ASCII mode is the default, hexadecimal is used as the default radix for numeric literals that are specified on the command line. /BYTE Displays data at the specified location 1 byte at a time. /DECIMAL Displays the contents of the specified location in decimal format. /HEXADECIMAL Displays the contents of the specified location in hexadecimal format. /LONGWORD Displays data at the specified location 1 longword at a time. /OCTAL Displays the contents of the specified location in octal format. /WORD Displays data at the specified location 1 word at a time. 2 Examples 1.$ RUN MYPROG <Ctrl/Y> $ EXAMINE 2678 0002678: 1F4C5026 $ CONTINUE In this example, the RUN command begins execution of the image MYPROG.EXE. While MYPROG is running, pressing Ctrl/Y interrupts its execution, and the EXAMINE command displays the contents of virtual memory location 2678 (hexadecimal). 2.$ BASE = %X1C00 $ READBUF = BASE + %X50 $ ENDBUF = BASE + %XA0 $ RUN TEST <Ctrl/Y> $ EXAMINE/ASCII READBUF:ENDBUF 00001C50: BEGINNING OF FILE MAPPED TO GLOBAL SECTION . . . In this example, before executing the program TEST.EXE, symbolic names are defined for the program's base address and for labels READBUF and ENDBUF; all are expressed in hexadecimal format using the radix operator %X. READBUF and ENDBUF define offsets from the program base. While the program is executing, pressing Ctrl/Y interrupts it, and the EXAMINE command displays in ASCII format all data between the specified memory locations.

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